background image

background image

 

Sinister Forces

A Grimoire of American Political Witchcraft

Book One

:

The Nine

Peter Levenda

T

RINE

D

AY W

ALTERVILLE

, O

REGON


background image

SINISTER FORCES—A GRIMOIRE OF AMERICAN POLITICAL WITCHCRAFT: THE NINE
Copyright © 2005, 2011 Peter Levenda. All rights reserved.

TrineDay
PO Box 577
Walterville, OR 97489
www.TrineDay.com
support@TrineDay.com
 

Levenda, Peter

 

Sinister Forces—A Grimoire of American Political Witchcraft: The Nine / Peter Levenda ; with

forward by Jim Hougan — 1st ed.

p. cm.
(ISBN-13) 978-0-9841858-1-8 (ISBN-10) 0-9841858-1-X (acid-free paper)
(ISBN-13) 978-1-936296-75-0 (ISBN-10) 1-936296-75-6 EPUB
(ISBN-13) 978-1-936296-76-7 (ISBN-10) 1-936296-76-4 KINDLE

1. Political Corruption—United States. 2. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)—
MK-ULTRA—Operation BLUEBIRD. 3. Behavior Modicfication—United States.

4. Occultism—United States—History. 5. Crime—Serial Killers—Charles Manson—

Son of Sam. 6. Secret Societies—United States. 1. Title
364.1’3230973—

 
F

IRST

 

E

DITION

 

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Printed in the USA

Distribution to the Trade By:
Independent Publishers Group (IPG)
814 North Franklin Street
Chicago, Illinois 60610
312.337.0747
www.ipgbook.com
frontdesk@ipgbook.com


background image

 
 

For Rose


background image

Table of Contents

Title Page
Dedication

 

Foreword by Jim Hougan

 

Introduction: A Study in Scarlet

 

SECTION ONE: DEEP BACKGROUND

1. The Dunwich Horror: An Occult History of America

 

2. The Mountains of Madness: American Prehistory and the Occult

 

3. Red Dragon: The Ashland Tragedy

 

 

SECTION TWO: AGENTS OF THE DEVIL

4.  Unholy  Alliance:  Nazism,  Satanism  and  Psychological  Warfare  in
the USA

 

5. Bluebird

 

6. The Doors of Perception

 

 

SECTION THREE: CROSSFIRE

7. JFK

 

8. Rosemary's Baby

 

 

Appendix
Index
Chapter Headings for Sinister Forces Book Two and Three
Catalog


background image

 
One  cannot  coerce  the  Spiritual:  if  one  attempts  to  enter  into  the  Light  without  preparation,  one
always faces the trials and dangers of Darkness. At the very least, an enforced entry into initiation
will drive the illegal entrant insane.
— David Ovason,

 

The Zelator


background image

F

OREWORD

BY

 

J

IM

 

H

OUGAN

J

ust when the 20th Century went amok, and why, is difficult to say, but the

creation  of  the  CIA  would  seem  to  have  been,  at  the  very  least,  a
contributing factor.

Born in the septic afterglow of World War II, and in keen anticipation of

its  successor,  WW  III  (a/k/a  “the  Big  One”),  the  Agency  was  shaped,  in
part,  by  transformative  events  that  had  taken  place  earlier  in  the  century.
These  were  the  efflorescence  of  psychiatry  as  an  important  medical
practice, and a turn-of-the-century occult revival that reached a crescendo in
the 1920s.

Taken  together,  these  events  conspired  toward  unforeseen  ends,  not  the

least  of  which  was  the  conversion  of  the  American  heartland  into  a
laboratory experiment in “psychological warfare.”

As Peter Levenda, the author of this extraordinary and deeply scary book,

points  out,  the  term  is  a  translation  of  a  German  word,
Weltansschauungskrieg  (literally,  “world-view  warfare”).  By  way  of
example,  one  battle  in  this  war  got  under  way  in  1953,  when  the  Central
Intelligence  Agency  convened  “a  prestigious  group  of  scientists”  (watch
out, dear Reader, whenever you see that phrase) to discuss the problem of
UFOs. There were waves of sightings at the time, and people, in and out of
government,  were  getting  nervous  about  them.  Meeting  behind  closed
doors,  with  CIA  security  guards  at  the  ready,  the  so-called  “Robertson
Panel”  (named  for  Dr.  H.P.  Robertson,  a  physicist  and  weapons  expert  at
Caltech)  studied  the  Tremonton  sightings  and  other  films  of  lights  in  the
sky, and listened patiently to the reports of experts from the private sector,
the Air Force and Navy.

Soon,  it  became  apparent  that  the  experts  were  in  disagreement.  Some

claimed  that  the  lights  could  be  explained  in  terms  of  natural  phenomena
(e.g., sunlight on the wings of sea-gulls). Others, such as the Navy’s Photo-


background image

Interpretation  Laboratory,  insisted  that,  on  careful  study,  the  same  objects
appeared to be “self-luminous,” and therefore intelligently guided.

So it was a question of seagulls or rockets or spaceships. Or something.

No  matter.  Since  the  experts  could  not  agree  on  the  meaning  of  the

evidence in front of them, the scientific problem was redefined in political
terms.  Whatever  was  zipping  around  in  the  skies  over  America,  it  hadn’t
killed anyone (at least not yet, at least not directly). So there didn’t appear
to be a military threat.

Or was there?

The question arose as to what might happen if the Soviets tried to exploit

the phenomenon, preying on the superstitions and weaknesses of the man in
the street. A “War of the Worlds” panic might easily result. “Mass hysteria”
would set in, and emergency reporting channels would be overloaded. Air-
defense intelligence sources would be compromised.

The  Reds  could  walk  right  in!  If  not  to  Washington,  then  West  Berlin.

Something had to be done.

It was decided, therefore, that the subject had to be “debunked.” That is

to say, UFOs needed to be made intellectually disreputable in the hope that
they would eventually become unthinkable. In this way, the problem (if not
the lights themselves) would be made to disappear.

So it was that a covert operation was mounted, with the Ozzie & Harriet

world of Middle America as its target. Celebrities such as Arthur Godfrey
were  enlisted  to  make  fun  of  the  subject  and  ridicule  those  who  were
interested  in  it.  UFO  watchdog  groups,  such  as  Wisconsin’s  Aerial
Phenomena Research Organization (APRO), were placed under surveillance
and infiltrated. The Jam Handy Organization, which produced World War II
films  for  the  American  Army,  was  retained,  along  with  the  Walt  Disney
organization.  Journalists  working  for

 

Life

 

and  the

 

Saturday  Evening  Post

were  dragged  into  the  fray,  as  was  the  Navy’s  Special  Devices  Center  on
Long Island.


background image

It  took  a  while,  but  UFOs  eventually  became  a  kind  of  in-joke  among

those who hoped to be taken seriously. To raise the issue in public was to
invite  ridicule  and  trigger  snickers.  By  1960,  curiosity  about  mysterious
lights in the sky was regarded by many as evidence of mental “instability.”
While an expression of interest in the subject would not be enough to get
you committed, neither would it enhance your resume.

Other psy-ops followed, at home and abroad. Levenda discusses many of

them, including Gen. Edward Lansdale’s manipulation of the vampire myth
in  the  Philippines,  and  the  CIA’s  scheme  to  eliminate  Fidel  Castro  by
persuading his constituents that he was, in fact,

 

el Anticristo.

The  JFK  assassination  was,  of  course,  a  focal-point  in  the  world-view

war  waged  by  the  CIA.  Just  as  the  Agency  conspired  to  make  curiosity
about “flying saucers” a litmus test for an addled mind, excessive interest in
the  President’s  murder  was  made  to  seem  “ghoulish”  and  trivial.  For  a
journalist  or  historian  to  write  critically  about  either  subject  was
professional suicide.

Eventually,  psy-ops  like  these  combined  to  redefine  the  parameters  of

acceptable  discourse  in  America.  Principal  among  the  notions  placed
beyond  the  Pale  was  the  practice  and  theory  of  “conspiracism”—which
soon came to include criticism of mainstream reportage. More than a matter
of  seeing  cabals  behind  every  murder,  it  was  a  way  of  thinking,  a  stance
toward the networks, the press and the feds. Anyone who looked too deeply
into  events,  or  who  asked  too  many  questions,  was  dismissed  as  “a
conspiracy-theorist.”  (This,  after  MK-ULTRA,  Iran-Contra,  BCCI  and  the
destruction of the World Trade Centers.)

In some ways, it is as if the century itself has been encrypted, so that if an

historian  would  be  honest,  he  must  also  become  an  investigator  reporter.
Failing  that,  we  are  left  at  the  mercy  of  ambitious  academicians  and
journalists,  stenographers  to  power  who  are  themselves  complicit  in  an
astonishing string of cover-ups and atrocities that stretch from Dealey Plaza
to  Watergate,  Waco  to  9-11.

 

Pier  Paolo  Pasolini,  the  Italian  poet  and  film

director  who  was  stomped  to  death  by  a  street-hustler  in  1975  (unless,  as
some  insist,  he  was  beaten  to  death  by  a  gang  of  fascists)  understood.
Fascinated  by  the  20th  Century  vectors  of  politics  and  violence,  Pasolini


background image

despaired  of  the  way  in  which  the  age  has  been  encrypted.  Writing  in
Corriere della Sera,

 

a left-wing newspaper, he declared,

I know the names of those responsible for the slaughters...

I know the names of the powerful group...

I know the names of those who, between one mass and the next, made
provision and guaranteed political protection...

I know the names of the important and serious figures who are behind
the ridiculous figures...

I  know  the  names  of  the  important  and  serious  figures  behind  the
tragic kids...

I know all these names and all the acts (the slaughters, the attacks on
institutions) they have been guilty of...

I know. But I don’t have the proof. I don’t even have clues.

Well, here they are: the clues, seething in the evidentiary equivalent of
what the French call “a basket of crabs,” in the first volume of what
promises to be a virtual encyclopedia of clues. Levenda calls

 

Sinister

Forces

 

“a grimoire,” or manual for invoking demons.

Certainly,  there  are  demons  enough  in  its  pages:  Charles  Manson  and

Richard  Helms,  Aleister  Crowley  and  David  Ferrie,  Jack  Parsons  and  the
Son of Sam. The “usual suspects,” you say? Well, yes, of course. But the
suspects

  are  served  up  with  an  entourage  of  angels  and  demons  you  may

never have heard of: Arthur Young and C.D. Jackson, Andrija Puharich and
The  Nine,  not  to  mention  a  claque  of  “Wandering  Bishops”  and  the
proprietors of Music World in Wilder, Kentucky (surely the model for the
nightmare-cantina in Quentin Tarantino’s “From Dusk Til Dawn”).

But  that’s  just  for  openers.  Levenda’s  study  is  broad  and  deep,  a  life’s

work that runs to volumes. What distinguishes it from other efforts, such as
those  of  Pasolini,  is  not  merely  its  comprehensiveness.  Rather,  it  is
Levenda’s realization that a matrix of politics and violence is incapable of
explaining the demented century that shuddered to an end in Manhattan, not


background image

so  long  ago.  What’s  needed  is  a  third  dimension,  and  that  dimension,  he
tells us, is “the occult.”

By  this,  Levenda  means  something  broader  than  a  mix  of  magic  and

religion.  When  he  writes  of  the  occult,  he  means  to  include  whatever  is
secret,  hidden,  or  unknown.  Add  this  dimension  to  those  of  politics  and
violence, and the century shivers into focus.

 

Sinister Forces

 

is about evil in

what is now the digital age:

 

Evil 2.0.

Time

 

magazine  long  ago,  and  famously,  posed  the  question:  “Is  God

Dead?”  Implicit  in  Levenda’s  study  is  a  related  inquiry:  Did  the  Devil
survive  Him?  If  he  did  not,  then  how  are  we  to  explain  a  century  of
recreational homicide and political mayhem?

Perhaps with reference to what seems to be a Fortean element: the pattern

of  coincidence  that  enfolds  these  highly  strange  events,  adding  a  distinct
“woo-woo factor” to Levenda’s study. Whether it is Lee Harvey Oswald’s
habit of hanging out at the Bluebird Cafe in Atsugi, Japan (“Bluebird” was
the  code-name  of  a  CIA  mind  control  program  to  produce  “programmed
assassins”), or the famous chain of coincidences surrounding the Kennedy
and  Lincoln  assassinations,  (eg.,  Lincoln’s  secretary  named  Kennedy  and
Kennedy’s secretary named Lincoln each warned the President not to make
his  fatal  sojourn).  It  seems  almost  as  if  an  early  warning  system  is
embedded  in  the  passage  of  time  itself,  or  in  what  Carl  Jung  called  the
Collective  Unconscious.  And  that  system  would  seem  to  be  sending  a
stream of warning signals, enciphered as synchronicities.

Exploring topics like this is what makes

 

The Nine

 

one of the darkest and

most  provocative  books  that  you  are  ever  likely  to  read  (pending
publication of Book II). That said, it also one of the most enjoyable, easy to
pick  up  (start  reading  on  any  page),  and  hard  to  put  down.  Levenda’s
intuitions  are  a  delight,  and  his  choice  of  subject-matter  unerring.  Both  a
compendium  of  20th  century  evil  and  an  investigation  of  it,  Levenda’s
study is deep, intuitive (and, often, droll).

It is, in other words, parapolitics at their most bizarre and, I suspect, their

most illuminating. Like UFOs, conspiracies and assassination, serial killers,
mind control and the occult, “evil” isn’t something that serious people are


background image

supposed to think about. If they did, the emergency reporting system would
soon be overloaded. And you know what happens when that occurs.

All hell breaks loose.


background image

background image

INTRODUCTION:

A S

TUDY

 

I

N

 

S

CARLET

“There’s  the  scarlet  thread  of  murder  running  through  the  colourless
skein of life, and our duty is to unravel it, and isolate it, and expose
every inch of it.”

— Sherlock Holmes in

 

A Study in Scarlet, by Sir Arthur

Conan Doyle, 1887

August 25, 2000 Rome
 

I

t is the centenary of the death of Friedrich Nietzsche, but I am in Rome. A

week  ago,  I  was  in  Turin,  standing  in  the  plaza  where  Nietzsche  went
insane  in  January,  1889.  He  saw  a  horse  being  whipped  and—out  of  all
character—was so moved to compassion that he threw his arms around the
horse’s  neck  and  suffered  a  nervous  breakdown  on  the  spot.  Since  then,
psychiatrists  have  been  of  the  opinion  that  this  spontaneous  gesture  of
compassion was so alien to Nietzsche’s own writings that it precipitated the
breakdown.

1

  Compassion,  that  most  un-Darwinian  of  emotions,  went

against everything Nietzsche thought he stood for.

What blond beast, its hour come round at last…

I  am  thinking  of  Nietzsche  now,  in  the  intense,  unforgiving  sun  of  St.

Peter’s  Square  in  a  relentlessly  hot  August,  escorting  an  American
executive (my employer) and his fiancée on a tour of Rome. In a way I am
coming full circle to my childhood from this moment in time, nearly fifty
years after my birth and, like Nietzsche, I am confronted with my antithesis.
It is not a whipped horse I see before me, however, but as we descend into
the crypt below the high altar it is a small casket said to contain the bones


background image

of  St.  Peter  himself,  the  first  Pope  and  the  small  rock  on  which  Christ  is
said to have built his church.

Ecce Homo. Nietzsche’s last work, finished in the months before he went

mad,  titled  after  Pontius  Pilate’s  famous  words  to  the  crowd  as  he  asked
them  to  spare  the  accused  Jesus  Christ:  Behold  the  Man.

  St.  Peter  was

murdered, and died a martyr’s death. This pilgrimage to make contact with
his remains—remains over which the entire edifice of Roman Catholicism
has been built—is for me a confrontation with the Enemy. And, like all true
Enemies, in his face I see my own.

Christ  was  executed,  according  to  the  official  version  of  the  story

(although this has always been in doubt, both among historians and among
members of Western secret societies). His chosen successor, Simon Peter—
in  whose  Basilica  I  now  stand—was  also  executed,  and  in  fact  crucified
upside-down.  St.  Peter’s  Cross  is  a  reverse  crucifix,  such  as  those  the
Satanists wear, perhaps marking them as more Christian than they would be
comfortable  knowing.  St.  Andrew  was  also  crucified,  he  of  the  X-shaped
cross.  And  every  Catholic  church  must  have  the  mortal  remains  of  some
saint present in the altar stone. It is, with its gruesome crucified Jesus and
saints  missing  eyes  and  being  roasted  alive  or  torn  to  pieces,  a  bloody
religion: a faith built on aggression and murder, madness and sacrifice. The
Passion.  The  early  Christians  met  in  catacombs,  in  cemeteries  and  in
darkness.  And  now  I  pass  lines  of  sarcophagi  containing  the  remains  of
dead  Popes  buried  beneath  the  nave  of  St.  Peter’s  Basilica.  More  death:
death  in  everlasting  rows,  quiet  chapels  and  candles  burning  alone,  in
silence. And there is the sarcophagus of Pope John Paul I. He was Pope for
a  month,  and  then  he  died.  Mysteriously,  to  be  sure.  There  is  evidence  to
suggest  he  was  murdered.  Volumes  of  evidence  and,  as  in  the  Kennedy
assassinations, the spoor of conspiracy and hatred.

“A  first  class  relic  is  a  piece  of  the  saint’s  flesh  or  blood  or  bone.  A

second class relic is something the saint is known to have touched, such as
clothing worn. A third class relic is something touched to a first class relic.”
I am describing Catholic ritual and religion to my guests. They are Lutheran
and  Methodist,  respectively.  The  woman  has  wanted  to  visit  the  Sistine
Chapel since she was twelve. We have already done that, me standing aside
and  staring  up  at  the  Creation,  and  Adam  and  Eve  in  the  Garden,  not


background image

looking  too  closely  at  the  huge  Last  Judgment,  not  being  the  type  who
slows down on the highway to gaze at accident victims.

If the blood and bones of saints are relics, what are the blood and bones

of the common person: the murder victim? the suicide? the casualty of war?
What  secret  power  lies  forgotten  in  their  graves,  their  dump  sites,  their
formaldehyde jars on a serial killer’s shelf?

What Great Beast, its hour come round at last…

Everywhere  around  me  are  images  of  pissed-off  prophets:  Moses,  forever
the type-A executive, smashing and smoting and scolding everyone in sight,
taking on the Egyptians, a man who has the balls to ask God for a photostat
of the Ten Commandments after he, Moses, smashes the first set in anger at
his own people. You’ve got to be on pretty intimate terms with the Creator
to  go  up  the  mountain  a  second  time.  Moses,  on  some  statuary,  is  shown
with  horns  on  his  head.  And  then  there  are  Isaiah,  Jeremiah,  and  Ezekiel,
full of dire warnings and frightening predictions. John the Baptist, not the
sort you would want to invite to your GOP fundraiser. Danger is all around
us. Trust no one. The presence of Satan is everywhere implicit.

 

But who is

he?

Bogeyman. The word comes from the Russian,

 

bog, meaning “god.”

I stand a little apart as the executive and his fiancée approach the glass

window  that  opens  out  onto  St.  Peter’s  own  resting  place.  It  was  to  Peter
that Jesus said, “Get thee behind me, Satan!” I am nervous. The crowds are
too thick, this being a Jubilee Year and what the Italian papers are calling
La Woodstock del Pape. There is no possibility of silent contemplation of
St. Peter’s remains, no chance for a psychic connection with the founder of
the Christian organization. I glance to my right. There is a metal box there.
Peter’s Pence, it says. You’re supposed to make a donation.

Even  St.  Peter’s  Basilica  is  not  immune.  Not  even  the  bones  of  Peter

himself. There is no way to avoid the collection plate, the thick envelope,
the  outstretched,  manicured  hand.  A  few  feet  away,  John  Paul  I  lies  in  a


background image

plain, unassuming box, while all around him the bodies of Popes who went
along to get along are buried in carved marble splendor.

Get thee behind me, Satan.

I  am  thinking  of  Nietzsche  again  as  we  make  our  way  over  to  the  gift

shop to organize the purchase of a poster of the Sistine ceiling, or

 

il volto

 

as

they say in Italian. The vault. A souvenir of the journey for the fiancée, who
believes in vampires and crystals and the Knights Templar and Rosslyn. She
already has a poster of that famous scene from the Chapel, the one where
God leans over and almost—but not quite—touches the languid fingertip of
Adam. I sometimes wonder if Adam and God are actually pointing at each
other, challenging the other to take the blame for what can only be a pretty
messed  up  Creation.  There  is  supposed  to  be  tension  in  that  painting,  the
tension of a gun about to go off. As I once wrote, long ago,

I have respect for God, the same respect I have for a loaded gun, or the

hand that holds it.

2

 

and

 

God is the only safe thing to be.

3

And Nietzsche wrote,

We should reconsider cruelty and open our eyes… Almost everything
we call “higher culture” is based on the spiritualization of cruelty, on
its  becoming  more  profound:  this  is  my  proposition.  That  “savage
animal” has not really been “mortified”; it lives and flourishes, it has
merely become—divine.

4

 and The great epochs of our life come when

we gain the courage to rechristen our evil as what is best in us. 

5

“Rechristen our evil” …an unintended irony?

We find a taxi to take us back to the Hotel Hassler, that ornate pile atop

the  Spanish  Steps.  We  are  lucky;  the  day  is  hot  and  the  pilgrims  many.
Getting a taxi at St. Peter’s Square is no mean feat; I know, I have struggled
many  times  in  the  past  in  all  kinds  of  weather.  The  visit  has  been
overwhelming: too many statues, too many paintings, too many rooms. But
the effect has been to bring me back to my childhood, to the smell of stale


background image

incense and dusty cassocks, to Latin conjurations and exorcisms, to the roll
call  of  the  dead—the  murdered  and  the  suicides—that  I  have  known  and
survived.  To  the  plots  and  counterplots  and  subplots  that  I  have  been
assiduously  recording  for  the  past  thirty  years.  And  to  that  Catholic
specialty, guilt.

As I bid the other Americans good evening and take the elevator to my

room, I wonder if I can start writing the book I have put off for years, as I
did one more bit of research, sought out one more lead, read one more dry
volume  on  psychology,  or  criminology,  or  assassination.  I  feel  stronger,
more capable, articulate in a way writers have to be.

But in the back of my mind glows the small casket of St. Peter’s remains,

a  silvered  shadow  of  Satan,  and  that  last  crazed  moment  of  Nietzsche  in
Turin, embracing a startled horse and asking for forgiveness. And love. And
going insane.

Like all journeys of a thousand miles, this one began with a single step. It
was  an  article  in  the

 

Village  Voice

 

by  Craig  Karpel,  entitled  “Patriotic

Witchcraft,” and it was in two parts. The

 

Voice

 

is a weekly newspaper, and I

waited  eagerly  for  the  following  week’s  conclusion.  It  was  the  time  of
Watergate, and I was wallowing.

I worked during the day for the Bendix Corporation, at their International

Marketing Operation on Broadway in midtown Manhattan. At night, I was a
struggling  writer.  I  wrote  short  stories,  poems,  and  novellas,  working  my
way up to the novel. I had no illusions, though; I knew that getting paid for
writing is virtually impossible, so I was relatively content to write “for the
drawer.”  I  had  no  social  obligations,  I  was  single,  answerable  only  to
myself. I spent more money on books than on any other item in my modest
studio apartment in Brooklyn Heights. I treated friends to meals and long,
stately coffee sessions on Montague Street, when I had the money, and we
would talk about Vietnam, and the Kennedy assassinations, and Watergate,
and the Middle East, and World War II and its aftermath. Across the East
River from the Brooklyn Heights Promenade, we could watch the doomed
World Trade Center towers going up. A few blocks from Montague Street is
Atlantic Avenue and the Arab Quarter, and we spent at least one day a week


background image

eating  at  the  Lebanese  or  Syrian  or  Moroccan  restaurants  there,  and
attending  parties—replete  with  belly  dancers  and  bromides—that  raised
money and consciousness for Palestinian charities. It was a time of paranoia
and innocence, a kind of national adolescence.

The  Watergate  revelations  were  coming  fast  and  furious,  and  I  was

amused by the startled and shocked expressions of my friends as each new
character took the stand with his or her briefcase full of scandals. None of it
surprised  me.  I  read  three  newspapers  every  day,  and  did  not  own  a
television set, so I considered myself better informed.

And then the

 

Voice

 

articles, and something ignited inside me.

Karpel was writing about some of the odd dimensions to Watergate that

had so far escaped the notice (or fell beneath the contempt) of mainstream
journalists.  The  fact  that  convicted  Watergate  “plumber,”  and  former  CIA
agent and Bay of Pigs officer, E. Howard Hunt was a part-time novelist who
had three occult novels to his credit (á la the Cigarette Smoking Man in the
X-Files2

 

television  series).  Or  the  fact  that  Richard  Nixon  had  “rushed  to

judgment” in the case of Charles Manson, declaring him “guilty” while the
trial  was  still  under  way  (a  fact  that  should  have  caused  a  mistrial,  but
didn’t). And the odd set of coincidences that linked Nixon’s resignation date
with the death of Marilyn Monroe, and the opening of the Haunted House at
Disneyland.

Indeed,  it  was  the  very  juxtaposition  of  those  words  “patriotic”  and

“witchcraft”  that  caused  some  kind  of  subconscious  chain  reaction,
resulting in the cortical fission that became the idea for this book. Manson,
Nixon,  Hunt,  occultism,  Monroe,  politics…  witchcraft.  It  was  delicious,  a
kind of Robert Ludlum on LSD experience. Throw in the Church of Satan,
Rosemary’s  Baby,

 

The  Manchurian  Candidate

 

and  the  Kennedy

assassinations, and the allure is irresistible.

To  what  degree  does  mysticism  (including  occultism,  religious

organizations,  and  secret  societies)  influence  politics?  Can  it  be
demonstrated  that  there  is  no  real  separation  of  church  and  state,  despite
most Americans’ belief? Can we show that the world’s political leaders are
motivated  by  (at  times  bizarre  and  outrageous)  religious  or  spiritual


background image

convictions,  thus  threatening  at  the  least  the  very  nature  of  the  American
way of life… and at the most American lives in general?

Is politics a science? Is it an art?

Or is it religion?

Armed with these uneasy questions, I set out to investigate as much human
history  as  possible  to  see  to  what  extent—if  any—religious  or  spiritual
ideas, convictions, or even regulations have influenced the political lives of
nations and contributed to happiness or suffering, peace or war, under the
control  of  visionary  leadership.  I  began  with  the  study  of  Nazi  occultism,
since  rumors  of  that  were  very  much  in  the  air  at  the  time.  I  visited  the
National Archives in Washington, D.C. and the Library of Congress and fell
upon  a  treasure  trove  of  documentation  showing  Nazi  fascination  with
occult  themes…  to  the  extent  of  financing  research  in  Tibet  and  hunting
down  the  Grail.  This  became  the  central  subject  matter  of  my  last  book,
Unholy  Alliance.  Here  was  a  perfect  example  of  a  nation  being  ruled  by
what  were  called—in  any  other

  age—occult  leaders  and  “spiritual”

visionaries. From the swastika to the SS, the Nazis were little more than the
20th  century’s  best  organized  (and  best  dressed)  cult.  A  political  party?
Please.

Simultaneously,  I  set  out  to  “deconstruct”  the  Manson  phenomenon.  I

read  everything  available  on  the  Tate/LaBianca  killings,  on  Manson’s
childhood  and  upbringing,  and  the  backgrounds  and  relationships  of  his
followers. I reviewed Manson’s history in California with the Beach Boys,
and with Angela Lansbury’s daughter and other minor celebrities. Manson’s
connection to the Church of Satan and to The Process was also important to
my research. And then, a strange thing happened (one of many that will be
mentioned during the course of this book): I realized that my first real job in
New  York  was  with  a  company  whose  owner,  Willy  Brandt,  had  a  son
(gossip  columnist  Steven  Brandt)  who  was  questioned  by  the  police  in
connection  with  the  Manson  killings  and  who  subsequently  committed
suicide—some  say  in  abject  fear  that  he  would  be  the  next  victim  of  the
“Family.”  In  other  words,  I  was  only  two  handshakes  away  from  the
Tate/LaBianca  killings  myself.  (It  was  at  this  same  company  that  I  later


background image

discovered  I  was  only  two  handshakes  away  from  the  Howard  Hughes
disappearance  and  the  Clifford  Irving  affair.  Coincidence  piled  on
coincidence, until I finally realized that coincidence itself is an important,
although neglected, factor in history, as we shall see.)

I  thought  I  had  all  this  pretty  much  nailed,  until  I  decided  one  day  to

drive  to  the  town  where  Manson  grew  up.  I  found  that  a  relative  of
Manson’s  had  been  murdered  in  Ashland  a  few  months  before  the
Tate/LaBianca  killings  took  place.  A  kitchen  knife  had  been  the  weapon
used,  stabbing  Darwin  Scott  nineteen  times  and  pinning  him  to  the
floorboards of his apartment. Clearly there was more to be discovered, and
a trip to Manson’s “home town” was in order.

Ashland, Kentucky is not a place where nice New York City boys like me

hang  out.  Although  it  is  well-known  as  the  birthplace  of  Naomi  and
Wynonna Judd, and Chuck Wollery of

 

The Love Connection,  it  is  a  small

town  dominated  by  the  petroleum  and  chemical  refineries  that  bear
Ashland’s  name.  I  noticed  that  serial  killer  Bobby  Joe  Long  came  from
Kenova,  West  Virginia,  which  is  a  smaller  town  only  a  few  miles  from
Ashland, and that serial killer Henry Lee Lucas was born in a Virginia town
on  the  West  Virginia  border.  I  wondered  what  it  was  about  this  particular
location—this Bermuda Triangle of depravity—that seemed to breed serial
killers and mass murderers. Was it the water?

So  I  rented  a  cool,  cherry-red  Ford  Mustang  convertible  and  made  the

drive  from  New  England  to  Ashland,  Kentucky,  stopping  off  first  in
Washington,

D.C. and then in the hollers of rural West Virginia during a thunderstorm.

The tale of that trip comes later in this book. Suffice it to say that I found
more than I bargained for in Ashland:

 

 

Ancient “Indian” burial mounds in the center of town;

A large house that was moved entire from its original site to one a
few  streets  over,  directly  on  a  line  with  burial  mounds  and
sporting  a  pair  of  griffins  on  its  roof,  mythical  creatures—


background image

according to the town’s own brochure—designed to ward off evil
spirits;

The  Ashland  Tragedy  and  Massacre:  a  savage  killing  of  three
children  on  a  Christmas  Eve  in  the  late  nineteenth  century,  the
subsequent  arrest  of  three  suspects,  and  a  massacre  of
townspeople  by  militia  detailed  to  protect  the  suspects  from  a
lynching; and

Oddest of all, the fact that a Manson relative and sometime petty
crook—Darwin  Scott—was  brutally  murdered  with  a  kitchen
knife  in  Ashland  a  few  months  before  the  celebrated
Tate/LaBianca  killings…  a  murder  case  that  has  never  been
solved.

It is said that “Kentucky” is an Indian word that means “dark and bloody

ground.” I wondered if it was true, if a physical place could be evil, could
hold  a  curse  that  would  affect  generations  of  residents  to  come.  Did  the
Indians know something we didn’t? Or did we unconsciously suspect that
the earth held some sinister secret? Indeed, the name first proposed for the
Commonwealth of Kentucky was… Transylvania.

And then I remembered the words of Cotton Mather, he of the Salem witch
trials  in  seventeenth  century  Massachusetts,  who  said  that  America  had
been the Devil’s land before the Europeans came, and wondered if he meant
more than simply that the Native Americans were not Christians.

And  then  there  were  the  stories  of  H.P.  Lovecraft,  the  father  of  Gothic

horror,  who  felt  that  there  was  something  ancient  and  evil  beneath  the
hardscrabble New England soil, a concept amplified by Shirley Jackson in
her stories of New England haunted houses and depraved villages.

After all, America has had its share of misery and tragedy, regardless of

the beautiful words and even more beautiful intentions of the Declaration of
Independence  and  Constitution.  Why  would  a  fertile  and  bountiful  land,
colonized  by  pious  and  fervent  European  Christians  of  every  variety,
descend  into  that  maelstrom  of  civil  war,  slavery,  mass  murder,


background image

assassinations,  and  day-to-day  violence  that  shocks  the  rest  of  the  world,
even as the rest of the world has had to deal with its Kaisers and Hitlers and
Mussolinis and Stalins and Maos and Hirohitos? Do we have more than our
share of violence, or is it simply that we get more PR?

Was the answer to be found in unraveling the skein of violence itself, like

the scarlet thread of murder in the very first Sherlock Holmes story, running

through the fabric of our history like a timeline? …Was I wrong to look at
religious  history?  Occult  history?  It  bore  such  interesting  and  convincing
fruit  in  my  Nazi  study.  Yet  surely  the  roots  of  American  violence  and
American evil could not grow from the same metaphysical soil?

And  as  I  poked  through  the  debris  of  American  history—the  autopsy

photos  and  the  police  reports  and  the  political  manifestos  and  the  trial
transcripts and the confessions and the lies and the declassified documents
and the bureaucratic memoranda—I saw that American history could not be
separated from my own history or from world history, that, as Americans,
we can’t look objectively at our own story. Like that famous conundrum in
quantum physics, the observer changes the event observed. Is the Kennedy
assassination a particle, or a wave?

During  the  Watergate  era  a  somewhat  unsettling  revelation  was  made:

that for twenty-five years (or more) the CIA had conducted psychological
experimentation  upon  both  volunteers  and  unwitting  subjects—both  at
home and abroad—to find the key to the unconscious mind, to memory, and
to  volition.  Their  goal  was  to  create  the  perfect  assassin  and  to  protect
America  from  the  programmed  assassins  of  other  countries.  This  project
was known by the name MK-ULTRA, but it had its origins in earlier forms
of  the  same  “brainwashing”  agenda:  Operations  BLUEBIRD  and
ARTICHOKE. To me, this was astounding. A US government agency was
conducting  what—to  a  medievalist—could  only  be  characterized  as  a
search for the Philosopher’s Stone, for occult power, for magical spells and
talismans. Indeed, some of the CIA’s subprojects included research among
the psychics, the mediums, the magicians and the witches of America and
beyond. And the Army was not far behind in its mind control testing, as we
shall see.


background image

What was even more disturbing was the revelation that nearly all records

of  this  incredible  and  superhumanly  ambitious  project  were  destroyed  in
1973 on orders of CIA director Richard Helms himself. In his testimony, he
claimed that MK-ULTRA did not come up with anything worthwhile, and
that  the  project  had  been  terminated.  Then  why  were  the  documents
shredded?

We  do  not  know  who  the  test  subjects  were.  We  don’t  know  what  was

done  to  them.  We  don’t  know  how  they  have  been  programmed,  if  at  all.
We don’t know what they might do.

Or what they have already done.

We do know, however, that some of our more colorful criminals have spent
time  at  the  same  institutions  receiving  CIA  MK-ULTRA  funding  for  this
“special  testing.”  People  like  Charles  Manson  and  Henry  Lee  Lucas,  for
instance,  as  well  as  “Cinque,”  the  leader  of  the  Symbionese  Liberation
Army that kidnapped heiress Patty Hearst. It is entirely possible, given the
evidence  at  our  disposal,  that  convicted  serial  killer  Arthur  Shawcross  is
also such an example.

As  I  stood  in  the  park  at  Ashland,  staring  at  the  ancient  burial  mounds

and looking up at the house with the griffins, I realized that I was standing
at  a  nexus  of  American  history  and  culture:  Charles  Manson,  unsolved
homicides, mind control experiments, mass murder and massacres… and I
wondered  what  Indian  burial  mounds  and  griffins,  movie  stars  and  spies,
witches and Washington, even UFOs and occultists, had to do with any of
it.

Our culture in the West—formed as it is by a faith in science, a reliance

on  the  technological—has  convinced  us  to  ignore  the  unseen.  There  is  a
web  of  connections  between  visible  events  and  visible,  measurable
phenomena that we cannot see, cannot measure—so our response has been
to  ignore  this  web  in  favor  of  what  we

 

can

 

see  and  measure.  The  blind

leading the blind. The drunk looking for his keys under a lamp post because
the light is better there. We know—can describe—the stages of growth of
flowers,  animals,  people…  but  not  the  life  force  itself,  the  drive:  what


background image

engineer, inventor and mystic Arthur Young called “the quantum of action.”
Of  this  we  know  nothing,  and  are  happy  to  know  nothing.  And  thus  we
become victims.

University of Chicago Professor Ioan Culianu was able to show that the

technique  of  secret  links  and  correspondences  between  objects  and  events
discovered by a Renaissance magician—Giordano Bruno—are applicable to
mind  control  and  psychological  warfare  today.  Charles  Manson  declared
himself  to  be  a  reincarnation  of  Bruno, 

6

an  oddly  sophisticated  choice  for

the  nearly-illiterate  convicted  murderer.  Professor  Culianu  himself  was
murdered in 1991, another crime that has never been solved.

The  people  we  trust  are  those  who  can  measure  the  measurable.  The

people we distrust are those who point to the invisible and shout to get our
attention. Our world is marching calmly to an obscure and unknowable end
because we, the people, hear the drum, feel the beat, know our place in line.
That’s better, somehow, than jumping off the path into the dark forest where
God dwells like a hungry tiger. There is too much personal responsibility in
jumping out of line, and if you then try to jump back in, you will find you
have lost your place and your fellow marchers no longer want you to join
them. You are dirty; you are crazed; you have seen what they are afraid to
see.

In  order  to  conduct  this  investigation  I  would  have  to  dig  very  deep,

below  the  surface  of  official  reports,  trial  transcripts  and  conspiracy
theories.  I  would  have  to  dig  deep  below  the  surface  of  the  American
psyche, and trace pieces of evidence back down through several layers of
meaning and relevance to find the connective tissue that would make sense
of our history, our politics, our collective weirdness. This would have to be
nothing less than a deconstruction of our most cherished beliefs and ideals.

Academia frowns upon historians who get “involved” with their subject

personally.  It  is  believed  such  activity  ruins  objectivity,  makes  the
historian’s findings suspect. The “New Journalism” changed that somewhat
for journalists, but not for historians. Yet, it is virtually impossible for any
American my age—born in 1950—to approach such subject matter as the
Kennedy  assassinations  or  the  Manson  killings  with  pure,  detached
objectivity.  We  lived  through  it  all.  We  either  marched  on  Washington  or


background image

marched in the jungles of Southeast Asia. We know where we were when
Kennedy was killed—and when the World Trade Center went down. We are
connected  to  these  events  and  cannot  extricate  ourselves  from  them,  even
when we let the documents and the primary sources speak for themselves.
For there are documents, and there is blood. Politics and religion both are
born of documents and of blood. And both documents and blood form the
primary sources of the following investigation.

This is a book about evil. Evil ordinary and extraordinary. Evil vigilant.

Evil  militant.  Evil  triumphant.  Evil  ancient  and  modern,  violent  and
discrete, beautiful and obscene. Evil in the face of God, of man and woman,
of  children.  The  evil  of  vainglorious  men  and  their  hollow  minions.  Evil
unseen  and  fierce.  The  evil  of  bodybags  and  spent  cartridges.  Of  mass
graves and crematoria. Of crimes against nature and against heaven. The
evil  of  death  and  derangement,  of  murder  and  madness,  of  suicide  and
satanism.  This  is  the  evil  that  is  older  than  humanity,  but  reflected  in  our
children’s eyes. The evil we can’t grasp, cannot punish, cannot destroy. The
evil  that  contaminates  souls  as  well  as  bodies,  nations  as  well  as  people.
This is a book about the evil spirits that haunt America. About the sinister
forces  that  rule  the  world  of  our  dreams,  our  nightmares,  and  our  sober,
trembling, waking reality.

If it is true that the gods of one religion become the demons of the one

that replaces it, then we in America must deal with generations of demons
once worshipped here who now wander the countryside, the city streets, the
interstate  highways  and  dead  end  roads,  the  theme  parks  and  fast  food
restaurants, the shopping malls and parking lots, the peepshow parlors and
cathedral aisles, like hungry ghosts on a mission from Hell. We gaze with
horror on their crimes, and don’t understand. We stare into the eyes of their
hideous creatures, and don’t understand. We clean up the crime scenes and
mop  up  the  blood,  and  don’t  understand.  We  imprison,  institutionalize,
execute to make it all go away… and don’t understand.

This  book  is  an  attempt  at  understanding.  The  premise  is  one  that  has

been  embraced  by  psychoanalysts  like  Jung  and  physicists  like  Pauli:  the
existence of another mechanism in the universe that binds together events
seemingly  unrelated.  The  perspective  offered  is  unique,  dangerous,
incredible,  possibly  offensive.  The  subject  matter—serial  homicide,


background image

genocide,  assassination,  terrorism,  multiple  personalities,  satanism,  sexual
savagery, demonic possession, depravity, insanity—makes it impossible to
be  anything  else.  We  cannot  begin  to  heal  until  we  have  identified  the
disease; we cannot identify the disease until we have studied the anatomy of
the body politic. Freud, in order to understand the workings of the human
mind, focused on its pathology. We, in order to understand America—and
America’s  place  in  the  world—must  do  the  same.  We  must  plumb  the
depths of the American psyche, the American unconscious, and dredge up
whatever we find before it’s too late.

How late is it? Listen in the middle of the night. Turn off the television,

the radio, the CD player, the computer. Unplug the telephone. Turn off the
lights. What do you hear? Beneath the silence and the stoic beating of your
humble heart, what do you hear? Can you hear your soul singing?

Or is it Satan laughing?

 

_________________________________________________________________________________
______________________

1

 

See,  for  instance,  Anacleto  Verrechia,  “Nietzsche’s  Breakdown  in  Turin,”  in

 

Nietzsche  in  Italy,

edited by Thomas Harrison, Anma Libri, Stanford University, 1988

2

 

Levenda,

 

Citadel, unpublished novel

3

 

Ibid.

4

 

Nietzsche,

 

Beyond Good and Evil, 1966, Vintage Press, NY p. 158

 

5

 

Ibid., p. 86

6

 

Charles Manson, “The Black/White Bus,” in

 

The Manson File,  edited  by  Nikolas  Shreck,  Amok

Press, NY, 1988, ISBN 0-941693-04-X

 


background image

background image

S

ECTION

 

O

NE

:

D

EEP

 

B

ACKGROUND

In the colonial period, when religious creeds, institutions, and communities exerted a major impact
on  life  and  work,  there  was  bound  to  be  some  spillover  into  politics.  Because  the  contribution  of
religion  to  American  political  culture  covers  such  important  beliefs  as  obedience,  the  design  of
government,  and  the  national  mission,  the  religious  roots  of  American  political  culture  merit  close
investigation.

 

— Kenneth D. Wald

1

Beware when the righteous prepare for the practice of evil.

 

— Kenneth Patchen

 

2

In absurd terms, as we have seen, revolt against men is also directed against God: great revolutions
are always metaphysical.

 

 

Albert Camus

 

3

Possession  and  exorcism  had  always  symbolized  the  rhythms  of  the  historical  process.

 

 

Stuart

Clark

4

 

1

 

Kenneth  D.  Wald,

 

Religion  and  Politics  in  the  United  States,  Washington,  DC,  1992,  ISBN  0-

87187-604-3, p. 42

2

 

Kenneth  Patchen,

 

The  Journal  of  Albion  Moonlight,  New  Directions,  NY,  1941,  ISBN  0-8112-

0144-9, p 106

 

3

 

Albert  Camus,

 

The  Myth  of  Sisyphus,  Vintage  International,  NY,  1991,  ISBN  0-67973373-6,  p.

127n

 

4

 

Stuart  Clark,

 

Thinking  With  Demons:  The  Idea  of  Witchcraft  in  Early  Modern  Europe,  Oxford

University Press, NY, 1999, ISBN 0-19-820808-1, p. 434

 

 


background image

background image

C

HAPTER

 

O

NE

THE DUNWICH HORROR:

 

AN OCCULT HISTORY OF

AMERICA

When a rise in the road brings the mountains in view above the deep woods, the feeling of strange
uneasiness is increased. The summits are too rounded and symmetrical to give a sense of comfort and
naturalness, and sometimes the sky silhouettes with especial clearness the queer circles of tall stone
pillars with which most of them are crowned.

 

— “The Dunwich Horror,” H.P. Lovecraft

 

1

L

ovecraft was writing in the 1920s, when most of his more famous stories

were published. He was writing of a New England that, in his imagination,
had  ancient  roots  in  unknown  cultures;  where  Druidic  circles  and  pagan
chants  would  infest  the  countryside;  where  a  kind  of  subterranean  culture
existed,  parallel  to  the  world  of  our  own  reality.  He  peppered  his  stories
with  references  to  the  works  of  archaeologists  and  anthropologists  (some
real,  some  fictitious),  and  connected  the  American  Indian  culture  to  the
worship of strange, perhaps extraplanetary or extradimensional beings who
viewed humans as little more than undercooked hors d’ouevres. His work
has  attracted  a  great  deal  of  attention  in  the  past  30  years  or  so,  oddly
enough in France where—like the films of Jerry Lewis—he is an adopted
obsession,  but  also  certainly  in  America  where  he  maintains  a  cult  status
even  now,  more  than  sixty  years  after  his  death.  He  has  attracted  serious,
albeit fringe, attention from academics and historians of both literature and
mysticism,  and  has  even  been  graced  with  an  anthology  of  his  work
prefaced  by  no  less  a  literary  light  than  Joyce 

Carol  Oates.

2

  The  blind

Argentine  author  of  many  essays  and  stories  on  the  macabre—Jorge  Luis
Borges—has  written  in  the  Lovecraftian  mode  in  homage  to  the  cranky
Yankee master.

3

 In addition, there are several hard-core occult organizations

in Europe and America that owe allegiance to the bizarre principles outlined
in his works. They have taken their names and identities straight from his
published work, with cults like

 

Dagon

 

and

 

Cthulhu, and occultist emeritus

Kenneth Grant has written extensively on the relation between the works of


background image

Lovecraft—an  author  of  gothic  horror  fiction—and  the  rituals  of  modern
ceremonial magic and communication with extraterrestrial intelligences. 

4

Part of the reason for Lovecraft’s popularity among serious occultists is

due  to  the  fact  that  many  of  the  ideas  he  put  forward  in  his  stories  have
found  some  basis  in  reality:  in  historical,  archaeological,  anthropological
reality.  While  there  is  no  evidence  at  this  time  for  the  existence  of  the
beings of which he wrote—Cthulhu chief among them, but let’s not forget
Yog Sothot or Shub Niggurath—there is evidence that America was visited,
and possibly inhabited for some time, by peoples who are not racially (or, at
least, culturally) identical to the Native American “Indian” tribes that exist
today.  The  schools  of  thought  over  this  are  contentious  and  emotional  in
defending  their  respective  positions.  The  group  most  consistently  under
attack  are  the  Diffusionists  (whose  most  famous  proponent  was  the  late
Harvard Professor Barry Fell), who adhere to the idea that America was not
settled by a single group of wanderers from Asia across the Bering Straits,
but by different groups of people from different parts of the globe. There is
growing archaeological evidence that people from Europe and North Africa
settled in North and South America thousands of years ago, bringing with
them their languages, their culture, and their religious and mystical beliefs.
And therein lies a tale. We will examine all of this in detail in Chapter Two.
For  now,  though,  let  us  look  at  some  well-known  stories,  but  from  a
different  perspective  and  with  additional  data  that  bear  directly  on  the
theme of this work. Seen in this sometimes unsettling light, they provide a
basis  for  the  revelations  that  will  come.  But  before  we  examine  the
archaeological  evidence,  let  us  look  at  the  purely  historical,  the  evidence
that can be supported by unimpeachable, primary sources.

 
1492

Lost  Americans  learn  very  early  in  their  primary  school  education  that
America was “discovered” by Christopher Columbus on October 12, 1492.
Some of them remember that he was supposed to be finding a more direct
route  to  India—by  going  west  instead  of  east—and  that  is  why  we  call
Native Americans “Indians” to this day: the result of Columbus’s blunder in
believing  that  the  small  Bahamian  island  he  discovered  was  part  of  the
Indian subcontinent. In the following weeks he would similarly “discover”


background image

Cuba  and  Hispaniola,  the  island  now  comprising  the  Dominican  Republic

and Haiti.

What is not well-known is the real reason for his expedition.

Yes, he wanted to find a fast route to India and China. At that time, the

great seafaring nations of Europe—in particular Portugal, but also Holland
and other maritime powers—were going south along the African coastline,
rounding South Africa at the Cape and going north and east to reach India.
Columbus—based  on  what  are  believed  to  be  faulty  geographic
measurements and a faith in some of the apocryphal books of the Bible—
thought  he  could  make  it  to  India  much  more  quickly  by  going  due  west
from  the  European  coast.  The  Portuguese  had  turned  this  idea  down,
realizing that his math was faulty, and the Spanish at first rejected him as
well,  but  he  later  had  an  audience  with  King  Ferdinand  of  Spain,  who
agreed  to  fund  his  expedition  and  to  grant  him  titles,  land  and  a  tenth  of
whatever precious metals he found: an agent’s commission.

This much is consistent with what our schoolchildren know.

However,  Spain  in  1492  was  in  the  middle  of  one  of  the  greatest

upheavals in its history. To understand what Columbus was doing, and the
hidden agenda of his voyage—and thereby to begin to understand American
history  from  a  European  perspective  (most  Americans  being,  after  all,
descendants of European ancestors)—we need to understand a little of what
was happening in Spain.

And  to  understand  Spain,  we  have  to  understand  the  history  of  Islamic

“imperialism”  and  its  stormy  relationship  to  Europe  in  general  and
Christianity in particular.

While such a topic deserves much more space and much more attention

to its detail than the author can ever hope to provide in these pages, we can
summarize  the  situation  as  follows.  Interested  readers  are  urged  to  follow
up with their own research, and several very good texts are recommended in
the  bibliography.  Essentially,  we  must  address  the  birth  and  expansion  of
Islam.


background image

Muhammad,  the  prophet  who  created  the  religion  known  as  Islam,  had  a
vision of the Angel Gabriel while meditating in a cave in what is now Saudi
Arabia.  He  was  forty  years  old,  a  tradesman,  a  pagan,  and  troubled  by
hearing Jewish and Christian tradesmen and others around them discussing
their respective religions. Monotheism was a new concept, and the year was
610 A.D.

The vision of Gabriel ignited something in Muhammad’s heart and soul.

He  began  preaching  a  personal  and  unique  amalgam  of  Jewish,  Christian
and  native  Arab  mythology  and  religious  and  moral  principles  to  anyone
who would listen. These principles included better treatment of slaves and
women, a life of moderation, a “surrender” to the one true God (the word

“Islam” means “surrender”), and other spiritual doctrines. Abstinence from
alcohol  and  the  eating  of  pork  were  also  included,  the  latter  a  probable
borrowing from Jewish law.

The people in his native Mecca found Muhammad to be something of a

problem, because his doctrines interfered with trade and with the status of
the social elite. Much as Christianity had evolved from a Messianic Jewish
cult  to  a  world  religion  and  was  about  to  conquer  much  of  Europe  as  a
political  power,  so  too  Muhammad  and  his  followers  were  seen  as  a
political and economic threat to the status quo.

Muhammad  escaped  a  murder  plot  in  Mecca  and,  with  some  of  his

followers,  fled  to  Medina.  This  was  in  the  year  622  A.D.,  the  year  of  the
“flight,” the

 

Hegira

 

from which year Islam now counts its calendar.

Muhammad  found  a  slightly  better  reception  in  Medina,  settled  several

tribal  disputes,  and  gradually  converted  many  of  these  tribes  to  his  new
religion.  He  tried  to  win  the  allegiance  of  the  Jews  in  Medina,  but  the
Prophet was an illiterate Arab tradesman, and the Jewish elite scorned him
and  his  new  religion  which  they  found  at  odds  with  the  Torah.  Although
Muhammad  initially  had  his  followers  face  Jerusalem  when  they  prayed,
and made them adopt the practice of the Yom Kippur fast, his experience
with  the  Jews  in  Medina  led  him  to  change  these  practices.  The  Muslims
now face Mecca, which is the site of an ancient Arab relic, the Qa’aba (at
the time of Muhammad a pagan shrine containing 360 idols and a piece of
black,  probably  meteoric,  rock),  and  they  fast  for  the  entire  month  of


background image

Ramadan.  Thus,  Islam  became  gradually  more  “Arab,”  as  Muhammad’s
initial  desire  to  wed  Judaism,  Christianity  and  indigenous  Arab  religious
ideas and forms met opposition on all sides. Due to this very early contact
with Jewish religious and economic leaders, the Koran has many citations
specifically  targeted  against  the  Jews.

5 

Thus,  some  modern-day  Muslims

feel they have religious approval—if not an out and out license—for their
antagonism against Israel.

As  his  religion  grew  in  numbers,  so  did  Muhammad  grow  in  political

power.  At  the  time  of  his  death,  Islam  was  virtually  the  state  religion  in
Saudi  Arabia.  During  the  next  hundred  years  after  his  death,  Arab  armies
would give the idea of missionary work a new meaning as they conquered
—with  fire  and  sword—nation  after  nation,  extending  their  faith  and  the
Arab  culture  as  far  afield  as  France,  where  they  were  finally  defeated  by
Charles Martel at the Battle of Tours in the year 800 A.D. They had to fall
back to Spain and Portugal in the west, and in the east as far as Samarkand,
Tashkent  and  Turkey.  Europe  would  hear  again  of  the  Arab  legions  when
the Ottoman Empire reached its height in the sixteenth century A.D., going
as  far  inland  as  the  outskirts  of  Vienna  and  running  over  the  Balkans,
Romania and everything in between.

It would be nearly another three hundred years after the Battle of Tours

before  the  first  Crusades  were  mounted  by  the  Catholic  Church  to  “take
back” the holy city of Jerusalem. Jerusalem was also sacred to the Muslims,
due  to  a  tradition  that  Muhammad  had  ascended  to  heaven  from  a  site  in
Jerusalem  that  was  also  sacred  to  Jews  and  Christians:  the  site  of  King
Solomon’s Temple. This scenario may be a borrowing from the legend of
Jesus and some stories of the Virgin Mother and of the prophet Elijah, who
were all bodily carried into heaven.

Muhammad’s  descendants—both  familial  and  spiritual—then  fought

over  the  growing  Islamic  empire.  Europe  saw  Islamic  forces  on  their  soil
within a century after the death of Islam’s founder. And, in Spain, it would
be another

 

eight hundred years

 

before the last Islamic rulers would finally

leave their country.

Specifically, in the year 1492.

 


background image

TALES OF THE ALHAMBRA

In the spring of 1829, the author of this work, whom curiosity had brought to Spain, made a
rambling  expedition  from  Seville  to  Granada  in  company  with  a  friend,  a  member  of  the
Russian Embassy at Madrid. Accident had thrown us together from distant regions of the globe
and  a  similarity  of  taste  led  us  to  wander  together  among  the  romantic  mountains  of
Andalusia.

— Washington Irving,

 

Tales of the Alhambra

6

In the spring of 2001, the author of this work, whom business had brought
to Spain, made a fast expedition from Seville to Granada in company with a
colleague,  an  executive  of  an  American  corporation  that  has  a  factory  in
Seville. Accident had thrown us together from distant regions of the globe
(he from North Carolina, me from my temporary base in Malaysia), and a
similarity of taste and a tightness of schedule led us to hire a car and drive
across Spain in search of Granada and the fabled palace of the Alhambra.

M

y Spanish is okay, my driving ability perhaps less so, yet I found myself

doing all the driving that day, getting us out of Seville at an early hour and
making  good  time  to  Granada.  As  was  the  case  with  that  earlier  tour  to
Rome  in  company  with  another  such  executive,  I  found  myself  less  of  a
chauffeur and more of a tour guide and ad hoc historian as we wandered the
fabulously  decorated  halls  and  courtyards  of  one  of  the  most  striking
examples of Arab architecture anywhere. It is always interesting for me to
watch American executives abroad, and to marvel at how little they really
know of the world outside their borders. This case was no exception.

The  executive  in  question  has  a  mother  who  is  fascinated  by  church

history,  and  who  has  a  passionate  attachment  to  the  Holy  Land  and
especially to Jerusalem and to the Holy Sepulcher, the site where Christ is
supposed to have been laid to rest after the Crucifixion. Yet, her son—a tall,
self-important  man  of  heroic  proportions,  with  paranoid  demeanor  and
somewhat  lacking  in  social  skills—seemed  relatively  unaware  of  Arab
conquests  in  Europe,  even  though  he  had  accompanied  his  mother  on  a
pilgrimage  to  Jerusalem  and  is  the  beneficiary  of  her  knowledge  of  the
subject.  I  found  myself  filling  in  odd  gaps  in  his  understanding  of  the
stormy  relationship  that  has  existed  between  Muslims  and  Christians


background image

virtually  since  the  death  of  Muhammad,  and  particularly  since  the
“Moorish” invasion of Europe in the eighth century A.D.

It  was  a  revelation  to  stand  in  the  Alhambra,  in  Spain,  and  realize  that

there had been an Islamic government in charge of large parts of the country
for eight hundred years. That is nearly as long as the time since the Norman
conquest  of  England  in  1066,  and  is  certainly  much  longer  than  the  time
elapsed  since  Columbus’  landing  on  San  Salvador  in  1492  and…  the
present.  The  cities  of  Seville,  Cordoba,  and  Granada  are  testimony  to  the
once-strong but now fading legacy of the Caliphs of the Alhambra.

Washington  Irving—the  American  author  perhaps  better  known  for  his

frightening

 

Legend  of  Sleepy  Hollow

 

and  the  somewhat  comical  and

perceptive story of

 

Rip Van Winkle—in his celebrated combination of short

stories and travelogue

 

Tales of the Alhambra

 

makes justified recognition of

the generally benign rule of the Moors in Spain, a reign that was famous for
learning, science and the arts, and which attracted scholars and artists from
all over Europe in its time. Nonetheless, it was an alien transplant in Europe
and—surrounded as it was by hostile Christians on every side and separated
by  sea  and  land  from  its  spiritual  home  in  the  Middle  East—it  eventually
succumbed to pressure from without and within.

The Moors were vanquished, finally, in January of 1492, the same year

that Columbus set sail on his first voyage to the New World, and that was
not  a  mere  coincidence.  King  Ferdinand  was  triumphant  in  removing  the
last vestige of Muslim political influence from western Europe… and began
to dream of another conquest.

This  is  what  American  schoolchildren  never  learn,  and  what  scholars

have been slow to report. From the

 

Diario

 

of Christopher Columbus, then:

And [Columbus] says that he hopes in God that on the return that he
would undertake from Castile he would find a barrel of gold that those
who were left would have acquired by exchange; and that they would
have  found  the  gold  mine  and  the  spicery,  and  those  things  in  such
quantity  that  the  sovereigns,  before  three  years,  will  undertake  and
prepare  to  go  conquer  the  Holy  Sepulcher;  for  thus  I  urged  Your
Highnesses  to  spend  all  the  profits  of  this  my  enterprise  on  the


background image

conquest  of  Jerusalem,  and  Your  Highnesses  laughed  and  said  that  it
would  please  them  and  that  even  without  this  profit  they  had  that
desire. 

7

The  conquest  of  Jerusalem  and  the  Holy  Sepulcher.  In  other  words,

another Crusade.

The discovery of America and the subsequent voyages of Columbus had as
their  goal

 

the  recapture  of  Jerusalem.

 

Indeed,  one  of  the  most  important

reasons  for  finding  the  “fast”  route  to  the  East  was  to  provide  Ferdinand
with a different strategy for retaking Jerusalem, for if Columbus was right
and  if  India  and  China  could  be  reached  by  traveling  due  west,  then  so
could  Jerusalem.  Rather  than  send  an  army  of  Crusaders  across  the
Mediterranean  or  via  land  through  hostile  Muslim  territory,  Ferdinand
believed  he  could  instead  attack  Jerusalem  from  the  eastern  side.  No  one
would  expect  a  Crusader  force  coming  from  the  land  east  of  Jerusalem,
when all previous attacks had come from the western approach.

Ironically, then, American history begins in the sands of Palestine, in the

solemn  stones  of  Jerusalem  and  King  Solomon’s  Temple,  the  Holy
Sepulcher  and  the  Dome  of  the  Rock,  where  so  many  have  fought  and
suffered and died for religion, and still do.

Much has been made in conspiracy literature of the possible connections

Columbus had with the outlawed Knights Templar. It is said that his fleet—
the famous

 

Nina,

 

Pinta

 

and

 

Santa Maria—bore  the  red  Templar  cross  on

their sails as a sign of the real mission of the Genoese-born Columbus and
his  Spanish  patrons.  Although  the  Templars  had  been  suppressed  two
hundred years previously, there is evidence to show that some members of
the  Order  had  escaped  to  Portugal  and  Scotland,  among  other  places.  We
can easily see how their descendants would have privately rejoiced in such
a Grail-like quest.

 

“Jacques de Molay, thou art avenged.”

 

We should also

remember it was Columbus’ patrons—King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella
—who created the Spanish Inquisition in 1478. At first, it was designed to
root  out  heresy  among  the  Marranos,  the  Jews  who  had  converted  to
Christianity, usually through social or other pressure. It was then extended


background image

to those who had converted from Islam. At its height, the Grand Inquisitor
was  also  responsible  for  the  American  territories  conquered  by  Spain:
Mexico and Peru, the lands of the Aztecs and the Incas respectively. In the
case of America, however, the Inquisition was concerned less with heresy,
and more with witchcraft and sorcery.

In  addition,  and  most  importantly,  we  should  realize  that  the  Spanish

Inquisition was not run by the Church. Authority was given by the Pope to
the  King  to  run  the  Inquisition,  thereby  making  it  a  governmental
organization, even though the Inquisitors themselves were usually Catholic
churchmen,  predominately  Dominican  monks.  This  mechanism  would  be
followed two hundred years later in Salem, Massachusetts during America’s
own witch trials, when religious authority gave way to secular, and witches
—practitioners  of  spell-casting,  Satan  worshipping,  and  other  such  acts
considered  anti-Christian—were  arrested,  indicted,  tried  and  executed  by
the secular courts. Heresy is tantamount to rebellion where there is a State
Church, and therefore it became the State’s business to discover and punish
—and torture and execute—heretics. They were, after all,

 

de facto

 

traitors.

Private beliefs became matters for public prosecutions.

And finally we should not forget that the Pilgrims, the Puritans and the

Huguenots—some  of  the  first  settlers  in  North  America—were  religious
refugees,  fleeing  oppression  in  their  native  lands,  to  practice  their  faiths
freely in the New World. It is no indulgence in hyperbole to suggest that the
modern  origins  of  America  are  spiritual  (or,  at  least,  religious)  in  nature,
and  that  America  has  spent  the  last  five  hundred  years  trying—usually
unsuccessfully—to ignore that fact.

In  light  of  the  events  of  September  11,  2001  in  the  United  States,  many
Americans have a dim view of Islam, and suspect all Muslims of harboring
ill intentions towards their country. In spite of all the rhetoric denying this,
there is some truth to the suspicion that devout Muslims are hostile to the
West. Islamic rulers have had a long and well-documented history of anti-
European  aggression,  beginning  with  the  invasions  in  the  eighth  century
A.D., long before the first Crusade against Jerusalem. Particularly since the
end of World War I, when the five hundred-year-old Ottoman Empire was
finally  destroyed  by  Western  forces,  and  when  the  betrayal  of  the  Arab


background image

revolt was etched in stone at the peace talks in Versailles—thus paving the
way  for  the  creation  of  a  Jewish  state  in  the  midst  of  Arab  Palestine—
Muslims  have  been  angry  at  the  West  and  at  what  they  perceive  to  be
Western decadence and immorality (an attempt, perhaps, to raise a visceral
sense of humiliation at the hands of the technologically-advanced nations to
a  higher  spiritual  plane).  Although  in  the  past  Christians  and  Jews  fared
better, oddly, under Muslim leaders than under Christian administrations, it
would  be  naïve  to  believe  that  most  Muslims  are  friendly  to  the  West  in
general  and  to  the  United  States  in  particular,  especially  in  light  of
America’s role in support of Israel. Islamic fundamentalism has been on the
rise worldwide, and the only thing stopping the creation of a new Ottoman
Empire is chronic disunity among Muslim nations.

But it was not always thus.

As I stood in the Court of the Lions at the Alhambra, while my colleague

wandered  back  and  forth  snapping  photographs  and  asking  endless
questions  for  which  he  rarely  stood  still  for  an  answer,  I  was  reminded—
with  a  kind  of  nostalgic  sigh—of  the  words  of  Washington  Irving,
describing the fall of the Caliphate:

Never was the annihilation of a people more complete than that of the
Morisco-Spaniards. Where are they? Ask the shores of Barbary and its
desert  places.  The  exiled  remnant  of  their  once  powerful  empire
disappeared among the barbarians of Africa, and ceased to be a nation.
They have not even left a distinct name behind them, though for nearly
eight centuries they were a distinct people. The home of their adoption,
and of their occupation for ages, refuses to acknowledge them, except
as invaders and usurpers. A few broken monuments are all that remain
to bear witness to their power and dominion, as solitary rocks, left far
in  the  interior,  bear  testimony  to  the  extent  of  some  vast  inundation.
Such  is  the  Alhambra;—a  Moslem  pile  in  the  midst  of  a  Christian
land;  an  Oriental  palace  amidst  the  Gothic  edifices  of  the  West;  an
elegant  memento  of  a  brave,  intelligent,  and  graceful  people,  who
conquered, ruled, flourished, and passed away.

8


background image

King  Ferdinand  raised  his  army  of  Crusaders,  but  never  managed  to

reach Jerusalem. The Crusaders found themselves in the midst of a military
adventure in Italy, and the dream of retaking Jerusalem in the wake of the
ouster of the Islamic government in Granada never materialized. But in the
same  year,  1492,  he  managed  to  forcibly  expel  from  Spain  all  Jews  who
would  not  convert  to  Christianity.  In  a  reign  worthy  of  admiration  by
Christian  fundamentalists  everywhere,  Ferdinand  had  managed  to  defeat
Islam,  expel  the  Jews,  and  mount  a  Crusade  against  the  Muslims  in  the
Holy  Land...  all  in  one  year.  He  was  also  responsible  for  the  infamous
Spanish  Inquisition  (immortalized  in  Edgar  Allen  Poe’s  “The  Pit  and  the
Pendulum”).  However,  to  American  schoolchildren,  King  Ferdinand  is
pictured  as  a  relatively  anonymous  or  even  benign  influence,  a  man  who
helped Columbus in his quest for a western passage to India, a hero of the
“round Earth” theory.

The  year  1492  for  some  scholars—including  the  brilliant  historian  Dame
Frances Yates in her

 

The Occult Philosophy In The Elizabethan Age—also

marked the beginning of the Renaissance, as Spanish Jews fled to Italy with
their  science,  art,  and  mystical  writings,  even  as  others  mark  the
Renaissance  as  beginning  with  the  fall  of  Constantinople  to  the  Turkish
Empire in 1453.

As for Columbus himself, alas, his succeeding three voyages were cursed

with  bad  luck,  violence,  and  death.  He  managed  to  visit  what  is  now
Trinidad  and  a  little  farther  on,  Venezuela  and  the  mouth  of  the  Orinoco
River, finally realizing that he had discovered a new land that was not on
the maps. But in the meantime his attempts to convert the Native Americans
to Catholicism—warlike Caribs and peaceful Arawaks, for the most part—
had failed miserably, and in some cases the Native Americans rose in revolt
and slaughtered their European visitors, only to be slaughtered themselves
in  return,  thus  instituting  a  pattern  of  attack  and  counterattack  that  would
plague  European/Native  American  relations  for  centuries.  Indeed,  it  was
Columbus who brought the first Native American slaves to Europe, about
two hundred of them, many of whom died of disease on the voyage. This
was a pattern that was to be followed by the Spanish who followed him to
the New World, as they captured native peoples and enslaved them to work


background image

on  their  plantations  in  the  American  Southwest,  the  Caribbean,  and  Latin
America.

Finally,  Columbus  was  put  in  irons  and  sent  back  to  Spain  in  disgrace.

What  he  had  accomplished,  however,  would  long  outlive  him  and  far
exceed

  his  wildest  expectations.  Spanish,  Portuguese,  Dutch,  English  and

French expeditions would be mounted over the course of the next hundred
years  to  take  as  much  of  the  “New  World”  as  possible,  regardless  of  the
opinions of the Arawaks or any of the other Native American peoples. And,
even as America was discovered by accident while a Spanish King and an
Italian  navigator  plotted  a  new  Crusade  to  take  back  the  Holy  Land,  they
and  their  descendants  committed  atrocity  after  atrocity  upon  the  pagan
peoples they found there.

But the Arawaks would have the last laugh. It would take them exactly

two hundred years—almost to the day—but they would have the last laugh.
 
THE CRUCIBLE

…the rumours of devil-worship were partly justified by a peculiar secret cult which had gained force
there and engulfed all the orthodox churches. It was called… “The Esoteric Order of Dagon,” and
was undoubtedly a debased, quasi-pagan thing imported from the East a century before…

 

— “The

Shadow Over Innsmouth,” H.P. Lovecraft

9

Eventually, Spanish explorers did find gold and all manner of treasure in the
New World. The names of Pizzaro, Cortez and Ponce de Leon are familiar
to  American  schoolchildren  as  the  illustrious  Spanish  conquistadores  and
explorers  who  spread  out  from  Florida  and  Cuba  to  Mexico  and  Peru,
Colombia and Venezuela and up to California and the American Southwest.
Their  legacy  lives  on  in  the  architecture,  the  culture,  the  language  and
especially  the  predominantly  Catholic  religion  of  Latin  America.  By  the
mid-sixteenth  century,  the  great  Aztec  empire  that  was  headquartered  in
what is now Mexico City had been subjugated to the Spanish crown with
fire and sword… and missionaries.

The  “Journey  to  the  West”  begun  by  Ferdinand  and  Columbus  in  1492

would  culminate  four  hundred  years  later,  after  the  conquest  of  not  only
much  of  Latin  America  but  also  the  Philippine  Islands.  Revolutions


background image

instigated  by  Simon  Bolivar  and  Bernardo  O’Higgins  in  South  America
would  eventually  free  the  continent  from  direct  control  by  Spain,  but  the
Crown  would  hold  on  to  Cuba,  Puerto  Rico,  the  Philippines  and  other
territories until the Span-ish-American War and Teddy Roosevelt’s famous
charge up San Juan Hill.

In  the  meantime,  however,  strange  things  were  taking  place  in  North

America,  a  short  ride  from  H.  P.  Lovecraft’s  home  town  in  Providence,
Rhode Island.

When they hear the word “Salem,” many Americans automatically think of
either  the  cigarette  or  witchcraft,  both  potentially  lethal  phenomena  to  be
sure.  Ironically,  they  do  share  a  common  origin,  at  least  in  popular
American history, and we will come to that in a moment. Disregarding King
Tobacco  for  now,  let’s  focus  on  what  we  know  about  Salem  witchcraft,
because its popularity has not diminished with time, and the town of Salem,
Massachusetts boasts an official Witch as well as a Witchcraft Museum, a
witchcraft shop, and a lot of rather silly bumper-stickers.

Essentially, the story is that a few young girls in Salem were being told

ghost stories by a Black slave, Tituba, who had been brought to Salem from
her  native  Barbados.  These  stories,  full  of  sorcery  and  spells,  enticed  the
girls and they began either to practice these forms of folk magic or to focus
on  them  so  intensively  that  they  started  to  exhibit  drastic  personality
changes.  This,  in  turn,  both  terrified  the  villagers  and  instigated  similar
behavior in other girls to the point that witchcraft was suspected. The girls,
brought to trial, started naming names as those responsible for “bewitching”
them,  and  eventually  dozens  of  people  were  accused  of  witchcraft  and
many were executed.

The year was 1692.

Recent scholarship, however, has shown that Tituba was not an African

slave,  but  a  Native  American,  a  member  of  the  Arawak  people  who  had
been  brought  out  of  Venezuela  to  Barbados,  where  she  was  bought  by
Samuel  Parris,  the  tradesman  and  future  minister  who  figures  so
prominently  in  Salem  history.  And  a  close  reading  of  the  trial  transcripts


background image

and  of  the  records  made  by  observers  at  the  scene  reveals  that  what  was
taking  place  in  Salem  in  1692  was  not  purely  the  result  of  overactive
imaginations and what psychiatry used to like to call “hysteria” (a term with
rather offensive origins in that it implies that the womb—hyster

 

is Latin for

“womb”—is  the  source  of  emotional  instability  in  women,  with  a
corresponding implication that men are incapable of such a state). Instead,
some  of  the  accounts  of  demonic  possession  ring  strangely  true,
accompanied  as  they  are  with  reports  of  paranormal  phenomena,  intense
rage and blasphemy, etc. When I say “strangely true,” I hasten to clarify that
these  states  are  virtually  identical  in  every  respect  to  those  accounts  of
modern day possession, as reported by Catholic and Protestant clergymen in
Europe  and  the  United  States.  Many  have  insisted  that  there  was  no
witchcraft at Salem, but the evidence readily available proves otherwise.

The  other  assumption  that  is  often  made  is  that  the  Salem  witch  trials

were the first and last in the United States. Nothing could be more wrong.
America  has  been  home  to  accusations  of  witchcraft  since  the  earliest
Colonial  days,  as  well  as  to  alchemists,  astrologers  and  occultists  of  all
types.  In  fact,  the  situation  was  becoming  so  serious  that  in  the  late
seventeenth century the clergymen of Massachusetts were issuing warnings
to their flocks about the dangerous attractions of occultism in the Colony.

Yet,  the  history  of  European-style  occult  practices  in  the  American

colonies begins earlier than that. There are records of witchcraft accusations
and trials all over the East Coast and particularly in New England from the
mid-seventeenth century on. In a book published by Scribner’s in 1914—
Narratives of the Witchcraft Cases 1648-1706

 

by George Lincoln Burr, ed.

—we read of Elizabeth Garlick of Easthampton, Long Island (then a Dutch
colony, although settled by English) who was “indicted for witchcraft and
sent to Connecticut for trial” in the year 1658. 

10

Another two cases—those

of Ralph Hall and his wife and of Katherine Harrison—cropped up in 1665.
The accused were acquitted of the charges, except that in the case of Ralph
Hall’s wife, Mary, the court did find “some suspitions [sic] by the Evidence,
of  what  the  woman  is  Charged  with,  but  nothing  considerable  of  value  to
take away her life.”

11

 The couple were accused of having used witchcraft to

cause the deaths of a George Wood and the infant child of one Ann Rogers.


background image

This  occurred  at  what  is  now  City  Island,  in  the  borough  of  the  Bronx  in
New York City.

Indeed, a look at the record for witchcraft cases in New England in the

seventeenth  century  (which  is  the  earliest  for  which  we  have
documentation) shows that accusations, indictments, prosecutions and even
executions  were  taking  place  since  1638  and  extended  through  1697.  The
earliest  execution  for  which  records  can  be  found  is  of  Alice  Young,
executed in Windsor, Connecticut in 1647, followed by those of Elizabeth
Kendall of Cambridge, Massachusetts and Margaret Jones of Charlestown,
Massachusetts (the latter person executed in 1648). All in all, we can find a
total  of  132  persons  accused  of  witchcraft  in  New  England  alone  in  the
seventeenth  century,  not  counting  those  at  Salem.  Of  these  132  persons,
four  actually  confessed,  twenty  were  convicted,  and  fourteen  were
executed.  Again,  this  is  in  addition  to  the  nineteen  who  were  executed  at
Salem.  The  accused  were  overwhelmingly  female,  more  than  100  of  the
132. 

12

In  all  fairness,  though,  Salem  was  a  special  case:  156  accused,  30

convicted, 44 confessed, and 19 executed. Another prisoner was pressed to
death  during  torture  and  interrogation,  bringing  the  Salem  death  count  to
twenty, and several more died in jail.

Witches in the classical sense were not the only “alternative religionists”

in  the  Colonies.  A  strange  case  that  has  rarely  made  it  to  the  general
histories of America is that of Thomas Morton, and his infamous Maypole
at  what  is  now  Quincy,  Massachusetts  (not  far  from  Salem).  It  was  May
Day,  1637  (and  a  year  before  the  first  recorded  witchcraft  case  in  New
England). Thomas Morton decided that they should celebrate the day after
“old English custome: prepared to set up a Maypole upon the festivall day
of  Philip  and  Jacob;  &  therefore  brewed  a  barrell  of  excellent  beer,  &
provided a case of bottles to be spent, with other good cheer, for all comers
of that day…. A goodly pine tree of 80 foot long, was reared up, with a pair
of buckshorns nailed on, somewhat neare unto the top of it…” 

13

Morton also had the assistance of the Native Americans of the vicinity,

who  were  more  than  happy  to  join  in  the  celebration,  even  though  it  was


background image

intended  to  commemorate  the  renaming  of  the  area  from  Pasonagessit  to
Merry Mount. But, as Morton continues:

The  setting  up  of  this  Maypole  was  a  lamentable  spectacle  to  the
precise  separatists:  that  lived  at  New  Plymouth.  They  termed  it  an
Idoll; yea they called it the Calf of Horeb: and stood at defiance with
the place, naming it Mount Dagon… 

14

(Shades of H. P. Lovecraft!) But that wasn’t the end of the story.

Apparently, the English were taking slaves and indentured servants from

Massachusetts  to  Virginia  and  selling  or  renting  them  off.  Morton,  in  the
absence  of  the  traders,  then  appealed  to  the  remaining  Native  Americans,
slaves and servants that they should band together and resist the efforts to
expatriate  them,  as  it  were.  The  Maypole  was  the  first  official  attempt  at
organizing not only a pagan festival but an armed resistance to the English
officials  in  charge  of  the  slave  trade.  In  addition  to  welcoming  Native
Americans—and  especially  those  of  the  female  persuasion—to  the  feast,
and “consorting” with them and having all sorts of drunken revels, Morton
trained them in the use of firearms. When an English lieutenant arrived to
take charge of the rapidly deteriorating situation, he was thrown out of the
settlement and evidently had to beat a retreat for England.

Morton’s experiment began to attract a lot of attention from the English

authorities,  as  could  be  imagined.  No  less  a  figure  than  Captain  Miles
Standish himself—and a force comprised of eight men from “Pascataway,
Namkeake,  Winismett,  Weesagascusett,  Natasco,  and  other  places  where
any English were seated”—was sent on orders of the Governor to put down
the uprising, but Standish’s army was met with a force of arms by Morton’s
merry men.

The  resistance  did  not  last  long,  however  (William  Bradford  says  that

they  were  too  drunk  to  effectively  resist)  and  eventually  Morton  was
captured  and  put  in  irons  and  sent  to  England…  but  he  avoided  any
prosecution by the Crown and instead took the time off to compose a New
English  Dictionary.  (He  was,  after  all,  a  friend  of  dramatist  Ben  Jonson.)


background image

Another worthy, one John Endecott, was installed in Quincy in his place, a
no-nonsense sort who had the Maypole struck and the locals chastised.

By  that  time,  however,  the  damage  had  been  done.  The  “Indians”  now

had  modern  weapons,  and  instruction  in  their  use.  As  William  Bradford,
one of the early chroniclers of the period, despairs:

O the horribleness of this villainy! How many both Dutch and English
have been lately slain by those Indians, thus furnished; and no remedy
provided, nay, the evill more increased, and the blood of their brethren
sold for gaine, as is to be feared; and in what danger all these colonies
are in is too well known. Oh! That princes and parliaments would take
some timely order to prevent this mischief, and at length to suppress it,
by  some  exemplary  punishment  upon  some  of  these  gain  thirsty
murderers,  (for  they  deserve  no  better  title,)  before  their  collonies  in
these  parts  be  over  thrown  by  these  barbarous  savages,  thus  armed
with  their  owne  weapons,  by  these 

evill  instruments,  and  traitors  to

their neighbors and country. 

15

Scholarship suggests that the reasons the Puritans reacted so strongly to

Morton’s cult was twofold: In the first case, it was obvious that Morton and
his  men  were  sexually  involved  with  Native  American  women  (a  charge
that  would  be  made  against  one  of  the  accused  at  Salem  fifty-five  years
later). This in itself was bad enough; but giving their men firearms was the
last straw. This meant that they were now on a roughly equal footing with
the  Puritans,  could  hunt  as  well  or  better,  and  could  control  the  trade  in
beaver skins and other exportable items. Morton was open about both these
practices. He had written poems encouraging dalliances with Indian lasses,
and conducted firearm instruction and trading with Indian men. Of course,
the repercussions from Morton’s trade and instruction in firearms were to be
long-lasting.  The  “Indians”  now  had  weapons  and  could  more  effectively
resist the white settlers. The New England Indian wars began:

The Pequot War, 1637.

 

The Narragansett War, 1643-45.

 

King Philip’s War, 1675-1676.


background image

By  the  time  of  the  Salem  Witch  Trials  in  1692,  the  white  settlers  had

come to see themselves as surrounded by hostile forces, and to characterize
these forces as “savages” at best, and as demonic beings at worst. It was a
crucible, indeed.
 
WONDERS OF THE INVISIBLE WORLD

The New Englanders are a people of God settled in those, which were once the Devil’s territories;
and it may easily be supposed that the Devil was exceedingly disturbed, when he perceived such a
people here accomplishing the promise of old made unto our Blessed Jesus, That He should have the
utmost parts of the earth for his possession.

 

— Cotton Mather

 

16

Dame  Frances  Yates—the  aforementioned  historian,  of  the  University  of
London, the British Academy, the Warburg Institute, and the Royal Society
of  Literature—has  written  extensively  on  the  Elizabethan  period  and  the
Renaissance, with a particular focus on occult literature, thus elevating the
study  somewhat  above  its  usual  relegation  to  the  attention  of  cranks  and
publicity seekers. In her

 

The Occult Philosophy In The Elizabethan Age

 

she

makes  an  interesting,  if  daring,  claim  that  the  Puritan  movement  owed
much to occult ideology current in England at the time, with connections to
Pico  della  Mirandola,  Cornelius  Agrippa,  and  other  saints  of  the  occultist
canon. This form of occultism—known as Christian Cabala to historians—
was  an  amalgamation  of  the  Jewish  Cabala  with  Muslim  and  Christian
elements;  in  other  words,  an  attempt  to  integrate  the  three  religions  by
focusing  on  some  basic,  mystical  elements  that  they  had  in  common.
Among these was the belief in a sophisticated form of numerology where
letters  have  numeric  equivalents,  and  in  the  rituals  of  invoking  angelic
forces.  Eventually,  this  intellectual  and  spiritual  movement  came  to  be
represented  in  such  organizations  as  the  Rosicrucians  and  the  Masonic
societies, and to embrace various other occult disciplines such as alchemy
and ceremonial magic.

What may cause some New Englanders no small degree of astonishment

—if not, in some cases, amusement or even alarm—is the fact that no less a
personage  than  Governor  John  Winthrop,  Jr.  was  a  practicing  alchemist
during his administration (1659-1676). It is noted that his library contained
some “275 books on alchemy and the occult.” 

17

He was well-versed not only

in  these  arcane  matters,  but  also  on  the  subject  of  the  Rosicrucians,  a


background image

putative  secret  society  (like  the  Freemasons  and  the  Templars)  whose
existence was proclaimed at the very beginning of the seventeenth century,
probably by occult scholar Robert Fludd. During Winthrop’s tenure, in fact,
many people were accused of witchcraft, and three were executed: Rebecca
and Nathaniel Greensmith of Hartford and Mary Barnes of Farmington.

Alchemy  and  the  study  of  ceremonial  magic  as  well  as  the  medical

theories  of  Paracelsus  were  considered  gentlemanly  pursuits  in  the
seventeenth century, and indeed we know that many esteemed scientists of
the day were also practicing occultists of some type. As D. Michael Quinn
notes  in  his  excellent  and  exhaustive

 

Early  Mormonism  and  the  Magic

World View,

Many of New England’s practicing alchemists were Yale and Harvard
graduates  who  continued  their  experiments  into  the  1820s.  These
alchemists  served  as  chief  justice  of  Massachusetts,  president  of  the
Massachusetts  Medical  Society,  president  of  Yale  College,  and
president of the Connecticut Medical Society

18

Such  historically  important  scientists  as  Isaac  Newton,  Roger  Bacon,

Liebniz  and  many  others  were  enthusiastic  practicing  occultists  and
members  of  occult  secret  societies.  Newton’s  interests  have  been
thoroughly outlined in Michael White’s

 

Isaac Newton, the Last Sorcerer, a

book  which  caused  no  little  controversy  upon  publication,  since  modern
science  has  been  at  pains  to  disparage  the  paranormal  in  general  and
organized occult activity and beliefs in particular. To demonstrate that the
“father  of  modern  physics”  had  deeply  held  mystical  beliefs—which  may
have  influenced  his  thinking  in  science—was  simply  too  much  for  some
members  of  the  scientific  establishment  to  bear.  At  the  time  of  the  Salem
trials,  Newton  was  in  the  throes  of  a  kind  of  nervous  breakdown,  hard  at
work  at  trying  to  decipher  the  Bible  on  the  one  hand,  and  involved  with
alchemical experiments on the other. (As we shall show in a later chapter,
Newton  had  a  twentieth  century  counterpart  in  Nobel  Prize-winning
physicist Wolfang Pauli.) Yale University Professor Jon Butler, in

 

Awash in

a  Sea  of  Faith:  Christianizing  the  American  People,  gives  a  valuable
synopsis of the religious, mystical and occult milieu in seventeenth century
America,  including  the  scientists,  lawmakers,  ministers  and  other


background image

community leaders who were themselves involved in alchemy, ceremonial
magic,  Rosicrucianism  and  other  occult  practices  and  movements.  Large
libraries of occult books, secret correspondence with like-minded occultists
or  members  of  secret  societies,  and  avant-garde  religious  sentiments—
particularly  in  a  political  context,  and  including  such  American  Founding
Fathers  as  Washington,  Franklin  and  Jefferson—defined  the  spiritual
atmosphere  of  the  intellectual  class  of  the  colonies;  divining  rods,  shew
stones,  and  magic  charms  and  talismans  as  well  as  basic  astrological  lore
defined  the  approach  of  the  lower  and  middle  classes.  Yet  both  groups
shared  a  common  belief  in  the  actions  of  invisible  forces  in  the  world,
forces which could be manipulated or cajoled into cooperation for mundane
goals.  Forces  which  could  be  summoned  by  magic  white  and  black,  by
priestly  magicians  in  the  shadow  of  the  Church  or  by  evil  witches  in  the
farms, villages and back alley lanes of the common people.

This, then, was the environment in which the good villagers of Salem found
themselves in 1692. Two hundred years after the discovery of America by
would-be  Crusader  Christopher  Columbus  and  his  crew—many  of  whom
had fought the Muslims in Spain—the English colonists found themselves
facing  a  pagan  enemy  in  their  midst...  and  alchemists,  astrologers  and
magicians hidden among their churchmen, their governors, their doctors. In
fact,  the  Indians  themselves  might  very  well  be  demonic  beings  and  not
humans at all; at the very least, they were believed to be Satan worshippers.
Cotton  Mather  insisted  that  the  Devil  himself  had  brought  the  Indians  to
America, since there was no mention of their race in the Bible. Thus, when
Lovecraft wrote his fanciful stories of pagan cults in New England he was
touching  a  deeply  buried  memory  of  the  very  land  in  which  he  lived.
Columbus—and his Dutch, French and English followers in North America
—brought the Cross and the Sword, in a blaze of neo-Templar fury, to bear
down upon the Red Man, to convert him or to kill him. The hatred of the
Puritans for deviation of any kind would inevitably turn inward and begin
killing  them  off  from  within.  And  the  instrument  of  that  social  suicide
would  be  none  other  than  another  Red  Man  or,  in  this  case,  Red  Woman.
Her  name  was  Tituba,  and  she  was  an  Arawak  whose  ancestors  lived  in
Guyana,  Venezuela  and  elsewhere  in  the  Caribbean;  whose  ancestors  had


background image

welcomed and trusted Columbus; and who had paid the price of that trust
with their lives.

The Arawak are famous for two exports. Tituba—and the ensuing Salem

witchcraft  case—is  one;  tobacco  is  another.  It  was  once  again  brother
Columbus  who,  in  1492,  saw  the  Arawaks  smoking  tobacco  in  a  kind  of
tube  they  called

 

tobago,

 

and  hence  smoking—and  the  word  “tobacco”—

came to the white man from the Arawak. In fact, even the word “cannibal”
comes from the Arawak language.

Tituba’s ancestors came from what is now Guyana, the South American

country  that  would  later  become  famous  as  the  site  of  the  Jonestown
massacre. She herself was purchased as a slave from Barbados, by Samuel
Parris: a minister and central figure in the Salem witch trials. Her story is
covered  in  Elaine  Breslaw’s

 

Tituba,  Reluctant  Witch  of  Salem,

 

and  her

testimony  is  analyzed  and  “deconstructed”  with  a  view  to  sorting  the
Arawak and Amerindian mythology and magic from the Puritan version.

Professor  Breslaw  mentions  a  native  Guyanese  belief  in  the  “evil

stranger,” the

 

kenaima,  who  causes  evil  things  to  happen  in  a  village  and

who can take various forms (such as other humans, animals, etc.). This is
always  a  stranger,  someone  from  outside  the  village,  and  Tituba  in  her
testimony  before  the  magistrates  began  to  point  a  finger  at  evil  outside
influences  behind  the  witchcraft  covens  in  Salem.  She  claimed  that  the
ringleader  of  the  witches  was  a  “man  in  black”  who  lived  in  Boston,  that
she and the other Salem witches attended meetings in Boston in spirit form,
and  that  they  received  their  instructions  to  return  to  Salem  and  hurt  the
children living there.

In  addition,  perhaps  the  greatest  controversy  over  how  the  trials  were

conducted was the issue of “spectral evidence.” It was this type of evidence
against  which  Cotton  Mather  warned  time  and  again,  but  usually  in  vain.
Although  Reverend  Mather  believed  in  the  existence  of  witches  and  in
paranormal phenomena generally, he doubted the admissibility of testimony
based  on  people’s  visions  of  demons,  evil  spirits,  and  other  phenomena
which could not be witnessed by the judges in a courtroom. In other words,
it was enough for someone to say that “so and so bewitched me” in spirit
form.  If  the  accused  was  sitting  in  the  dock,  peacefully  at  rest,  but  the


background image

“victims” cried out that he or she was tormenting them by occult means and
then fell over in fits to demonstrate the fact, many judges tended to credit
that  as  evidence.  In  this  case,  the  spectre  or  spiritual  form  of  the  accused
was doing the tormenting, even though no one other than the victim would
see it. The Guyanese

 

kenaima

 

could, of course according to legend, assume

any  form,  animate  or  inanimate.  So  in  the  context  of  Arawak  magic  and
witchcraft, the stories about shape-shifting witches and ghostly appearances
of one’s neighbors in the middle of the night or in a dream were perfectly
acceptable.  What  is  remarkable—as  has  been  noted  by  Professor  Breslaw
and others—is that the Salem Puritans would adopt much of this tradition as
their own, with suitable changes and amendments as they integrated these
beliefs into their Christian system.

In  the  final  analysis,  what  we  have  here  is  probably  the  first  recorded

instance of what would become the satanic survivor craze of America in the
1980s.  In  fact,  many  of  Tituba’s  “memories”—as  well  as  those  of  her
“coconspirators”—were  slow  in  coming,  and  memory  disorders,  real  or
imagined  or  feigned,  were  part  of  the  Salem  experience.  Recovered
memories, tortured children, witch covens, a satanic network spanning the
Northeast… welcome to Geraldo Nation. Add to this mixture the figure of
the  “man  in  black,”  and  we  can  tie  all  of  this  in  nicely  with  the  UFO
phenomenon.  Indeed,  Tituba’s  account  of  leaving  her  body  at  night  and
traveling  to  the  meetings,  and  then  returning  again  before  dawn,  sounds
eerily similar to some accounts of alien abductions. The existence of witch
marks—odd bruises on one’s body suggestive of pacts with the Devil, etc.
—have their correlates with the stories of alien surgery and alien implants.
In fact, Tituba first claimed that she flew to Boston through the air in both
body and soul, but amended this fact later to state that she only appeared in
Boston in the spirit.

(Compare this historical event with satanic cult survivor syndrome, and

wonder  if  the  stories  of  a  network  of  satanic  cults  breeding  children  for
human  sacrifice—along  with  the  confessions  of  persons  who  claim  they
were breeders, or had been pressed into cult service while children—are in
any  way  different  from  those  of  the  Salem  case.  Then  wonder  a  little
further, and ask: if there was smoke in the Salem case—and evidence of at
least a small fire—and if some clergymen, politicians, and scientists in New


background image

England in 1692 were involved in serious occult studies and research, then
perhaps there was a fire beneath all the smoke of the satanic cult hysteria of
three  hundred  years  later,  and  perhaps  some  of  our  own  clergymen,
politicians and scientists in America of 1992 were also involved in serious
occult  research.  Is  it  simply  a  recurring  phenomenon,  or  is  there  a  link
between the events of 1692 and those of present-day America?)

Washington  Irving—mentioned  above  as  the  author  of  a  series  of  tales

about the Muslim palace, the Alhambra, in Spain (in which palace, in fact,
he lived for a while)—is also the author of

 

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. In

this  Halloween  tale  of  headless  horsemen  and  unrequited  love,  we  have
Ichabod Crane: a schoolteacher. One of Ichabod’s claims to fame is that he
“had read several books quite through, and was a perfect master of Cotton
Mather’s history of New-England Witchcraft, in which, by the way, he most
firmly  and  potently  believed.”

19

  It  would  be  hard  to  overestimate  the

importance of Mather’s work among the population of the Northeast in the
late  seventeenth  and  early  eighteenth  centuries.  Cotton  Mather  had  been
present  at  the  Salem  witch  trials—and  at  the  trials  and  investigations  of
numerous  other  witches  and  purported  cases  of  witchcraft—and  is  a
somewhat trustworthy observer of what transpired. It was he who gave us
the  wonderful  concept  of  the  Invisible  World  as  the  domain  of  the  evil
spirits, and it is to this domain that we will return again and again in one
form… or another.

We  have  been  advised  by  some  credible  Christians  yet  alive,  that  a
malefactor,  accused  of  witchcraft  as  well  as  murder,  and  executed  in
this place more than forty years ago, did then give notice of an horrible
plot against the country by witchcraft, and a foundation of witchcraft
then laid, which if it

 were not seasonably discovered, would probably

blow up, and pull down all the churches in the country. And we have
now with horror seen the discovery of such a witchcraft! An army of
devils is horribly broke in upon the place which is the center, and after
a sort, the firstborn of our English settlements: and the houses of the
good people there are filled with doleful shrieks of their children and
servants,  tormented  by  invisible  hands,  with 

tortures  altogether

preternatural.


background image

—Cotton Mather,

 

Wonders of the Invisible

World 

20

Here,  then,  in  a  nutshell  is  the  gist  of  the  entire  Salem  witchcraft

phenomenon. There is a plot of witches against the churches of the country,
an attempt to pull down Christianity and replace it by devil worship; and the
brunt of the attack is taken upon the “firstborn of our English settlements,”
i.e., Salem, Massachusetts. The witches have decided to attack Christianity
at  a  place  named  after  Jerusalem,  the  City  of  Peace,  in  a  land  which  the
Puritans had hoped would become the New Jerusalem after the irretrievable
loss  of  the  Old.  (America,  after  all,  was  discovered  during  an  attempt  to
finance a new Crusade to take back the original Jerusalem. Failing that, a
town  in  America  was  named  after  it  which  has  now,  ironically,  become
synonymous  with  witchcraft!)  The  site  of  the  attack  therefore  has  deep
symbolic  and  spiritual  ramifications.  It  is  both  the  “firstborn”  of  the
settlements, and a place named after the sacred city of Jews, Christians and
Muslims. The attack is being waged by “invisible hands,” the first wave of
a  plot  that  was  in  existence  forty  years  before  the  Salem  trials,  that  is,
sometime  in  the  1650s.  The  allusion  by  Mather  to  a  person  convicted  of
witchcraft  and  murder  in  Salem  and  executed  at  about  that  time  is
mysterious, as it does not come up in any of the documents I have been able
to locate. Yet, the insistence by Mather that the occurrence of witchcraft in
Salem is the result of a plot by devil worshippers to take over the country is
worth considering for several reasons.

In  the  first  place,  such  an  accusation  would  serve  to  rally  the  people

together  by  making  witchcraft  a  threat  to  everyone  and  not  only  to  those
afflicted  by  torments  and  curses.  It  is  a  master  stroke,  and  reminiscent  of
Hitler’s castigation of a Jewish plot against Germany.

In  the  second  place,  it  implies  that  the  witches  are  well-organized  and

have  been  setting  this  up  for  over  forty  years.  In  other  words,  it  is
impossible to know who your friends are. People you have known all your
life may, indeed, be part of this ongoing plot to destroy Christianity in the
New  World.  If  they  are  truly  operating  by  invisible  means,  then  normal
systems of defense are hopeless.


background image

In  the  third  place—and  perhaps  most  importantly  of  all—the

“malefactor” of forty years ago was also a murderer as well as a witch. This
linking of supernatural powers and religious rebellion with actual murder is
very important. As in the case of the satanic cult survivor syndrome of the
1980s, satanic cults are not deemed threatening or even newsworthy unless
they  have  been  killing  people.  This  may  be  an  early  result  of  the  Church
coming  to  terms  with  science.  When  the  threat  of  diabolic  powers  and
unholy  worship  is  no  longer  enough  to  frighten—being  deemed  more  the
domain  of  fairy  tales  and  legends  than  the  real  world  of  physics  and
chemistry—then  murder  is  enough  to  bring  the  subject  of  satanists  and
witches back to the front burner. Remember, also, that these murders were
the result of black magic and not .44 calibre bullets. A poppet studded with
pins, hidden in a wall or buried in the garden, coupled with a corpse, was
enough  for  a  conviction.  It  satisfied  means  and  opportunity,  if  not  always
motive;  but  if  the  motive  is  the  plot  to  overthrow  Christianity,  then  no
further evidence is needed. The dead child or adult was simply a target of
opportunity in an all-out war against the forces of Light.

In  fact,  when  it  comes  to  the  case  of  “spectral  evidence”  in  which  the

sufferer perceives the shape or image of a certain person to be causing the
mischief, when the actual person can be shown to be elsewhere at the time
and “alibied-up” (as we say in the Bronx), Mather understands that to be a
wile of the Devil, rendering at times the person innocent even though that
person’s  “shape”  or  “spectre”  may  have  been  seen  by  the  bewitched.
Mather  goes  even  further,  to  say  that  though  the  person  himself  may  be
innocent  it  is  still  evidence  of  the  extent  of  the  diabolical  plot  against  the
land  that  the  Devil  is  capable  of  using  this  type  of  illusion  to  cause
dissension among the Christians and so to demoralize them.

These our poor afflicted neighbors, quickly after they become infected
and  infested  with  these  demons,  arrive  to  a  capacity  of  discerning
those  which  they  conceive  the  shapes  of  their  troublers;  and
notwithstanding  the  great  and  just  suspicion  that  the  demons  might
impose  the  shapes  of  innocent  persons  in  their  spectral  exhibitions
upon  the  sufferers  (which  may  perhaps  prove  no  small  part  of  the
witch-plot  in  the  issue),

 

yet  many  of  the  persons  thus  represented,

being  examined,  several  of  them  have  been  convicted  of  a  very


background image

damnable witchcraft: yea, more than one twenty have confessed, that
they  have  signed  unto  a  book,  which  the  devil  showed  them,  and
engaged in his hellish design of bewitching and ruining our land.

—Cotton Mather,

 

Wonders of the Invisible

World

 

(emphasis added )

21

Mather then, in prose fraught with presentiment of what would happen to
America in the 1980s, states,

We know not, at least I know not, how far the delusions of Satan may
be  interwoven  into  some  circumstances  of  the  confessions;  but  one
would think all the rules of understanding human nature are at an end,
if  after  so  many  most  voluntary  harmonious  confessions,  made  by
intelligent  persons  of  all  ages,  in  sundry  towns,  at  several  times,  we
must not believe the main strokes wherein those confessions all agree:
especially  when  we  have  a  thousand  preternatural  things  every  day
before  our  eyes,  wherein  the  confessors  do  acknowledge  their
concernment,  and  give  demonstration  of  their  being  so  concerned.

 

If

the devils now can strike the minds of men with any poisons of so fine
a composition and operation, that scores of innocent people shall unite,
in  confessions  of  a  crime,  which  we  see  actually  committed,  it  is  a
thing  prodigious,  beyond  the  wonders  of  the  former  ages,  and  it
threatens no less than a sort of a dissolution upon the world.

—Cotton Mather,

 

Wonders of the Invisible

World

 

(emphasis added)

22

In  other  words,  if  everyone  is  confessing  to  things  which  they  did  not

actually do, then it is still the action of the Devil, and the world is in even
more  danger.  Heads  I  win.  Tails  you  lose.  Either  the  confessions  are
genuine, and the witches guilty; or the confessions are false and have been
concocted by the Devil, in which case the accused may be innocent, but the
Devil is a lot stronger than we thought and the country is in jeopardy. Either
way, the Devil is abroad in the land.


background image

Or, at least, in Massachusetts.

One  of  the  most  revealing  views  of  Cotton  Mather  on  the  subject  of
witchcraft  appears  in  his  letters,  in  which  he  states  that  witchcraft  works
“upon the stage of imagination.” He never doubted the fact of witches and
witchcraft, but instead—after witnessing the events not only in Salem but in
other  cities  in  New  England  and  in  other  cases  of  witchcraft—understood
that  the  efficacy  of  witchcraft  resided  in  the  powers  of  the  mind.  We  say
that  “the  mind  plays  tricks”  or  “the  imagination  plays  tricks”  and  thereby
remove any personal responsibility from the event. But in Mather’s day, one
was  responsible  for  the  state  of  one’s  soul  and  could  not  shrug  off
culpability  by  blaming  one’s  parents  or  one’s  environment.  If  the
“imagination”  was  playing  tricks,  then  someone  was  playing  the
imagination.  Either  the  victim,  or  a  witch.  The  witch  as  manipulator  of
perception,  as  manipulator  of  the  imagination,  is  a  powerful  symbol  and
comes very close as a model for what actually transpires, as we shall see in
later chapters.

And  these  individuals  who  understand  the  workings  of  the  imagination

pose a great threat to society, in Mather’s eyes:

…at prodigious witch-meetings, the wretches have proceeded so far as
to concert and consult the methods of rooting out the Christian religion
from  this  country,  and  setting  up  instead  of  it  perhaps  a  more  gross
diabolism than ever the world saw before.

—Cotton Mather,

 

Wonders of the Invisible

World

 

23

These are very strong words. For Cotton Mather, the Invisible World is

indeed wondrous, and very, very dangerous.

Among  the  most  respected  historians  of  the  Salem  Witchcraft  trials  is

Chad-wick Hansen, who based his novel thesis on the close reading of the
actual  trial  transcripts  themselves  and  came  to  the  conclusion  that  there
was,  indeed,  witchcraft  being  practiced  in  Salem  and  that  some  of  the


background image

accused were actually guilty. In addition to this startling assertion, his study
Witchcraft at Salem,

 

originally published in 1969, goes on to conclude that

many of the girls were actually suffering from a clinical mental disorder.

Hansen states that the problem afflicting the Salem girls was hysteria, but

he  qualifies  this  by  saying  that  it  was  the  medical  condition  known  as
hysteria and not the popular concept of hysteria; in other words, he claims
that  the  girls  suffered  from  a  pathological  condition.  He  refers  to  Freud,
Janet  and  others  as  his  source  for  information  on  hysteria,  its  symptoms,
manifestations and presumed causes.

24

 It may be salutary to compare those

early definitions of hysteria with the

 

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of

Mental Disorders-III

 

(DSM-III) to see if there is still general agreement on

both symptomatology and causes.

What  is  more  interesting,  perhaps,  is  his  agreement  that  there  was,

indeed, witchcraft—specifically “image magic”—being practiced at Salem.
He goes further to provide some evidence of one murder being carried out
by an act of witchcraft. Of course, he puts this down to the general effect of
cursing  someone  in  a  superstitious  society:  if  you  believe  in  curses  and
witchcraft and you know you have been cursed, you give up hope and die.

This does not exonerate those who practiced such spells, however. If they

desired  to  cause  the  death  of  another  and  used  “superstitious”  means  to
effect that end, are they any less guilty because we—as moderns—profess
not to believe in witchcraft? On the contrary, the spell-casters seem just as
culpable to me as those who murder with knife, gun or poison. Especially in
the  context  of  1692,  it  would  seem  that  some  of  those  convicted  of
witchcraft may very well have been guilty.

As Hansen writes,

While  it  is  clearly  true  that  the  majority  of  persons  executed  for
witchcraft  were  innocent,  it  is  equally  true  that  some  of  them,  in
Massachusetts and 

elsewhere, were guilty.

25

And,


background image

It  should  be  clear  by  now  that  our  historians  have  erred  in  their
assumption that there was no witchcraft practiced at Salem, or that if
there  was  it  was  of  little  consequence.  The  documents,  rightly  read,
present  us  a  far  different  picture.  In  Bridget  Bishop,  Candy,  and
Mammy Redd we have three people who practiced black magic, and
with demonstrable success. In the Hoar family and George Burroughs
we have people who established a reputation for black magic and then
traded  on  it,  although  whether  they  were  actually  witches  remains
uncertain. …And if the testimony concerning Roger Toothaker and his
daughter may be taken at face value—and there is reason to believe it
may—we have one case of murder by witchcraft—one case in which
occult means were used to take a human life away. 

26

While Hansen admits that witchcraft and black magic were used by some

of  the  accused  Salem  witches,  he  still  tends  (as  would  most  sober  and
serious  historians)  to  associate  their  effects  with  the  clinical  definition  of
hysteria.

There  is,  however,  something  vaguely  unsatisfying  about  this  charge  of

hysteria. As Hansen himself relates,

27

 hysterical fits seem to be disappearing

as a rule, and he lays this to the fact that we—as moderns—don’t give the
hysterical fit as much attention or awe as before, so that as a mechanism it
has lost its usefulness. This seems to argue against hysteria being a genuine
pathology and the fit something over which a person has no control. One of
the essential elements of Hansen’s thesis seems to be that the bewitched of
Salem  were  not  frauds,  but  victims  of  a  pathological  condition.  Yet,  he
seems  to  believe  that  hysterical  fits  are  disappearing  in  the  modern  world
because there is no support in the environment or society for their religious
or  mystical  interpretations.  Perhaps  I  am  dull,  but  I  don’t  see  the  logic  of
this argument.

The type of hysteria Hansen is describing—and the symptoms to which

the transcripts of the Salem trials may refer—are covered in DSM-III (the
edition current with Hansen’s work) under “300.11 Conversion Disorder (or
Hysterical Neurosis, Conversion Type).” Under the heading “Predisposing
Factors,” we read,


background image

Antecedent physical disorder (which may provide a prototype for the
symptoms, e.g., pseudoseizures in individuals with epilepsy), exposure
to  other  individuals  with  real  physical  symptoms  or  conversion
symptoms, and extreme psychosocial stress (e.g., warfare or the recent
death of a significant figure) are predisposing factors.

28

We know from the transcripts that there was no evidence of “antecedent

physical  disorders”  and  “exposure  to  other  individuals  with  real  physical
symptoms or conversion symptoms” seems to be a way of alluding to the
popular  concept  of  “mass  hysteria,”  i.e.,  if  a  person  sees  one  hysteric
“acting out” then somehow this fit is contagious, like yawning or laughing,
and  you  have  a  chain  reaction  of  hysterics.  The  last  mentioned  factor  is
“extreme psychosocial stress,” and there

 

was

 

a degree of tension in Salem

Village in those days, but nowhere near enough to account for the outbreak
of  hysteria,  if  hysteria  it  was.  One  setting  that  contributes  to  hysteria—
according  to  DSM-III—is  warfare.  That’s  the  degree  of  extreme
psychosocial stress the authors of the DSM-III had in mind. So, we are left
with a question: What social factors contributed to the outbreak of hysteria
in Salem Village in 1692, of a nature equal to warfare?

Also, can hysteria be consciously controlled? The psychiatrists of today

would  tell  us  no,  that  it  is  a  pathological  condition  beyond  the  conscious
control  of  an  individual.  That  would  rule  out  fraud  in  the  case  of  Salem,
since the symptoms were so severe and so representative of the cases found
in Janet, Charcot, Freud, et. al. that there is no way to disregard them as a
kind of adolescent prank.

Many  of  the  symptoms  of  conversion  disorder  seem  equivalent  to  the

type of phenomena witnessed in cases of demonic possession, and certainly
many such cases were thus identified in the past. Hysterics in New England
in the seventeenth century were often “cured” by prayer, which would seem
to indicate a close relation to cases of demonic possession. It is possible that
“conversion  disorder”  and  “demonic  possession”  are  simply  two  ways  of
saying  the  same  thing…  but  that  should  not  lull  us  into  a  false  sense  of
security.


background image

Hansen  refers  to  parallel  cases  of  hysterical  fits  in  instances  of  New

England  “witchcraft”  and  in  European  medicine,  in

29

 

which  the  hysterical

victim claims to see beings tormenting her. Invective—including the use of
foul  expletives—is  common  in  both  types  of  cases.  No  less  an  authority
than  J.M.  Charcot  believed  that  the  hallucination  of  beings  attacking  his
patient were “reminiscences, doubtless, of the emotions experienced in her
youth.” 

30

What  does  that  mean?  That  these  emotions—buried  for  decades,

perhaps—come to the fore during an hysterical fit? Or are these emotions
perhaps  the  cause  of  the  fit?  How,  then,  to  describe  the  same  thing
happening to young girls, people still in their youth?

While  the  emotions  may  represent  buried  memories,  may  they  be  of  a

more atavistic nature? In the way of the collective unconscious of Jung, for
instance? Or perhaps they are what they seem to be to a select few Catholic
exorcists: evidence of the possession of the victim by some outside force?

It  is  common  to  say  that  a  belief  in  possession  carries  with  it  a

concomitant  belief  in  exorcism,  and  that  is  why  exorcism  works  and  not
because  there  is  a  real  demon  possessing  a  human  being.  But  that  is
somewhat tautological. Cancer patients undergoing radiation treatments and
chemotherapy  are  told  to  think  positive,  to  visualize  their  cancer  cells
dying, to develop a “will to live,” etc., leading us to wonder how much of
modern cancer therapy is analogous to witchcraft. If the mind-body system
is so interdependent as to support a whole host of radical therapies aimed at
treating  much  illness  as  psychosomatic—if  not  in  origin,  then  at  least  in
cure—then  perhaps  we  are  missing  the  boat  on  hysteria,  possession,  and
witchcraft. And if some of the current theories of quantum physics hold any
deeper meaning for us, then perhaps the notion of an “outside force” is not
too far-fetched.

Further, one could as easily suggest that because exorcism works, there

are real demons. Science says that there is no evidence that demons exist,
and that the symptoms of possession are actually those of other pathological
states  which  can  be  treated  with  scientific  procedures.  In  the  cases  where
science—i.e.,  medicine—fails  and  magic  works  (such  as  in  spontaneous
cancer remission, for instance, or in cases of exorcism), it is claimed to be


background image

only due to an imperfect understanding of the scientific mechanisms of the
specific malady, and not due to supernatural events.

What is not entertained—because it would cause a bit of social upheaval

and  a  great  deal  of  misunderstanding—is  the  possibility  that  these  two
claims  are  not  mutually  exclusive:  that  scientific  and  medical  procedures
contain within them an element of the supernatural or at least paranormal,
and  that  the  best  doctors  and  the  best  physicists  are  those  who  recognize
this and utilize it to the best of their ability.

Yet, Hansen goes on to insist,

The  direct  cause  of  these  fits,  in  the  courtroom  or  out  of  it,  was,  of
course, 

not  witchcraft  itself,  but  the  afflicted  person’s  fear  of

witchcraft.

31

This is all well and good, for it supports the party line that occult powers

per  se

 

either  do  not  exist,  or  exist  only  in  the  fevered  imaginations  of

occultists  and  fellow  travelers.  But  numerous  persons  at  the  Salem  trial
confessed  to  witchcraft,  and  in  specifics  and  in  detail.  Some  of  these
persons  were  known  occultists,  such  as  George  Burroughs  and  Samuel
Wardwell. William Barker’s confession in which he claimed there were 307
witches abroad in the land, and that they were part of a plot to replace the
practice of Christianity with that of Devil worship—hence the fact that the
Salem  panic  began  at  the  home  of  its  minister,  Samuel  Parris—is
discounted as patently false by Hansen and, of course, by everyone else. We
have variations today in the United States and elsewhere of “satanic panic”
and  charges  of  a  conspiracy  of  witches  or  occultists  in  the  land  who  are
working  towards  the  overthrow  of  Christianity,  etc.  Some  of  these
confessions,  however,  are  deliberate,  detailed,  expanded  upon,  citing
specific  events…  and  they  are  dismissed  because,  of  course,  there  are  no
such things as occult powers or the Devil making pacts with humans… or
even, dare we say, the Devil itself.

While it is not my intention to say that the confessions are literally true,

and that Barker, Wardwell and others were transported to witches’ sabbats
on  broomsticks  and  made  pacts  with  a  literal  Devil  and  signed  a  physical


background image

book and worked for the overthrow of Christianity, what I am suggesting is
that  there  is  a  dimension  to  these  confessions  that  is  beyond  fraud,  or
overactive  imaginations,  or  hysteria.  What  I  am  suggesting,  and  hope  to
demonstrate in the pages that follow, is that there exists a medium in which
occult “powers” do exist and do have an effect on the world as experienced
by  non-occultists,  and  that  the  evidence  that  is  available  to  support  this
thesis is convincing, and scientific.

As Cotton Mather states,

Our  dear  neighbors  are  most  really  tormented,  really  murdered,  and
really  acquainted  with  hidden  things  which  are  afterwards  proved
plainly to have 

been realities. 

3233

 
A STUDY IN SCARLET

…The  details  of  the  case  will  probably  be  never  known  now,  though  we  are  informed  upon  good
authority  that  the  crime  was  the  result  of  an  old-standing  and  romantic  feud,  in  which  love  and
Mormonism bore a part. It seems that both the victims belonged, in their younger days, to the Latter
Day Saints…

 

—“A Study In Scarlet,” Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

34

It is clear from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s first Sherlock Holmes story that
he  was  fascinated  with  the  history  of  the  Mormons,  also  known  as  the
Church  of  Jesus  Christ  of  Latter  Day  Saints.  Headquartered  in  Salt  Lake
City, Utah where the Mormon pilgrims finally ended their search for a place
to  practice  their  religion  freely,  they  are  famous  the  world  over  for  the
Mormon  Tabernacle  Choir,  for  their  collection  of  birth  records  and
genealogical  data,  and  perhaps  less  so  for  the  fact  that  the  late  Howard
Hughes,  billionaire  recluse  and  erstwhile  Hollywood  playboy,  insisted  on
Mormons  as  his  personal  staff  and  de  facto  bodyguards.  The  role  that  the
Mormons play in our story will be amplified later; for now it is only enough
to  look  at  their  mysterious  origins,  origins  that  gave  rise  to  the  first
Sherlock Holmes mystery.

The tale begins where we left off a few paragraphs ago, in the village of

Salem, Massachusetts. And it begins with the same topic as those infamous
trials: witchcraft, magic and secret societies. The witch—or wizard, as the
Salem judges would have termed him—was none other than Joseph Smith,
Jr., founder of the Mormon Church and the recipient of its sacred text, the


background image

Book of Mormon.

 

Like Muhammad, Joseph Smith was visited by an Angel.

Like Muhammad, he created a whole religion based on his angelic contacts.
But  unlike  Muhammad,  Joseph  Smith  was  actively  involved  in  the  use  of
ritual  magic—ceremonial  magic—for  the  purpose  of  finding  buried
treasure.  Like  a  Yankee  Doctor  Faustus,  Joseph  Smith  conjured  spirits  to
come  to  his  aid.  With  amulets  and  talismans,  pentacles  and  swords,  sigils
and  strange  alphabets,  he  stepped  from  the  misty  milieu  of  Continental
European magic and into the creation of the quintessential American-born
religion,  a  religion  which  ties  together  some  loose  ends  of  American
archaeology, Christian cabala, Freemasonry, and old-fashioned Bible stories
to weave a crazy quilt of millennial paranoia, pseudo-Egyptian magic, and
Masonic  ritual.  In  fact,  Joseph  Smith  could  be  considered  one  of  the
godfathers of the American occult scene, the progenitor of such groups as
the  Church  of  Satan,  the  OTO  “Caliphate,”  even  the  witchcraft  revival  of
the 1970s. One of the texts that was essential to Smith’s occult operations
was

 

The Magus, that vast compendium of occult beliefs and systems written

by  Francis  Barrett  two  hundred  years  ago,  which  was  republished  many
times during the American occult renaissance in the 1970s.

35

In  fact,  what  many  Americans—and  probably  most  Mormons—do  not

know  is  that  Joseph  Smith,  Jr.  (who  would  go  on  to  found  the  Mormon
religion)  was  a  direct  descendant  of  one  of  the  accusers  at  Salem,  one
Samuell Smith of Boxford, who accused Mary Easty of witchcraft. Samuell
Smith  was  Joseph  Smith’s  great-great-grandfather.  Another  accuser,  one
John  Gould—  who  accused  Sarah  Wilds—was  Samuell  Smith’s  father-in-
law.

Both Mary Easty and Sarah Wilds were executed at Salem in 1692, and

on  the  basis  of  the  accusations  of  Smith  and  Gould,  Joseph  Smith’s
ancestors... 

36

…and  in  1836,  Joseph  Smith  and  a  small  company  of  fellow  treasure-

seekers  decamped  to  Salem,  Massachusetts  for  the  purpose  of  renting  a
house where they believed treasure to be buried. It should be noted that this
is

 

six  years  after

 

the

 

Book  of  Mormon

 

was  first  published.  Joseph  Smith

was  already  the  Prophet,  had  already  founded  a  new  religion  based  on
revelations  inscribed  on  golden  plates,  and  was  a  well-known  figure  in


background image

American religion by that time. The evidence shows that he entered Salem
quietly,  attempted  to  rent  the  house,  failed  in  that,  was  forced  to  rent
another  close  by,  and  conducted  ceremonies  to  divine  the  location  of  the
supposed  treasure.  The  attempt  failed,  and  the  Prophet  left  Salem  without
the gold and silver he was sure was buried there. 

37

That  Joseph  Smith  should  have  been  heavily  involved  in  classic

operations  of  ceremonial  magic  came  as  a  shock  to  many  Mormons  and
Mormon-watchers.  While  insiders  know  of  the  quasi-Masonic  nature  of
Mormon  ritual—and,  in  fact,  that  Joseph  Smith  himself  was  an  initiated
Mason by 1842—the rest of the world was not prepared for the revelations
that  he  began  his  career  as  an  occultist  and  magician.  It  would  take  a
famous murder case 

38

to bring this news to public attention, and even then

the  emphasis  would  be  that  Smith  and  his  band  practiced  a  form  of
American  “folk  magic”  that  was  prevalent  in  the  country  at  the  time,  and
that  they  should  not  be  censured  or  criticized  for  what  was,  in  reality,  a
popular pastime among Americans.

To equate the formulas of ceremonial magic in such famous grimoires as

Barrett’s

 

The  Magus

 

with  “folk  magic,”  however,  is  naïve.  If  ceremonial

magic is “folk magic,” then what is the alternative form of magic? The fact
that  “common  people”  bought  sorcerers’  workbooks  and  tried  to  practice
the  confusing  and  often  bowdlerized  rituals  they  found  therein  does  not
mean that these practices themselves were “folk magic,” but only that the
folk were practicing them. This is perhaps more a reflection of the influence
of  the  publishing  industry  upon  American  mystical  and  religious
sensibilities than it is motive for a characterization of these practices as folk
magic.

For  these  early  Americans—white,  descendants  of  various  European

nationalities, whose forebears went back only a few generations before they
could  be  traced  to  the  ships  that  brought  them  from  England,  Holland,
France,  and  other  countries—were  not  “folk”  in  the  ordinary  sense  of  the
word. There was no indigenous folk magic in America because there were
no  indigenous  folk,  aside  from  the  Native  American  population  whose
religious and occult practices were largely unknown or—as in the case with
Cotton  Mather  and  his  writings—largely  misunderstood.  American  folk


background image

magic—as it is interpreted by historians—is the result of European systems
of belief transplanted to American shores, either by active practitioners of
these systems or by the printed word. And these were not folk systems, but
elaborate series of rituals based on the works of educated mystics, cabalists,
philosophers and magicians. In fact, an occultist would say—and with some
justification—that  it  was  the  imperfect  understanding  of  these  processes
that would lead to the murder of Joseph Smith himself by an angry mob in
Carthage, Illinois in 1847.

The story of Joseph Smith, the golden plates, the Angel Moroni, the

 

Book

of  Mormon

 

and  the  creation  of  the  Church  of  Jesus  Christ  of  Latter-Day

Saints (LDS) has been covered by many other historians and biographers,
so I will give only a short synopsis here as it relates to this study. The occult
aspects  are  covered  in  depth  by  Professor  Quinn,  and  elsewhere  as  noted
below.

Joseph Smith, Jr. was born on December 23, 1805 in the small town of

Sharon, Vermont to a strange family that included his father, Joseph Smith,
Sr., who was something of a wizard and ceremonial magician, a man given
to drawing magic circles in the earth with a sword and divining for hidden
treasure  with  a  diviner’s  rod  and  seer  stone,  and  his  mother,  who  was
involved in her own occult practices, and an aunt that married an alchemist.
The fact of his birth on (or about) the winter solstice must have given his
family  some  cause  for  rejoicing,  as  it  is  an  auspicious  day,  and  almost
Christmas as well. They must have thought that their son was destined for
great  things,  as  indeed  fortune  tellers  consulted  about  the  boy’s  future
predicted he would be.

But  he  was,  in  fact,  a  barefoot  farm  boy  for  most  of  his  early  life;  he

developed  a  knack  for  treasure-seeking  and  would  assist  his  father  in
attempts to find gold and precious stones buried underground. This was a
strange  occupation  for  a  young  boy,  especially  in  light  of  the  fact  that
treasure was rarely, if ever, discovered. What did transpire, however, would
produce  much  more  than  buried  treasure;  for  as  the  young  Joseph  Smith
spent day after day trying to contact spirits and gaze into magic stones in
the fruitless attempt to uncover buried wealth, he was opening himself up to
other influences, other forces. The treasure-seeking escapades were a kind


background image

of  ad  hoc  initiatory  program  for  Joseph  Smith,  and  he  began  to  see—not
treasure, but visions.

This  is  the  point  at  which  various  influences  come  together  in  a  single

person  and  produce  unbelievable  results,  far  in  excess  of  what  would
ordinarily  be  predicted  for  a  young  farm  boy  from  a  bizarre  background,
living  close  to  poverty,  far  from  any  city  or  center  of  education,  cultural
stimulation or sophistication of any kind. In fact, this is the type of family
and background that we might associate with that of the serial killer or mass
murderer.  After  all,  some  of  our  most  famous  killers—Charles  Manson,
Henry Lee Lucas, Otis Toole, Arthur Shawcross—all came from a similar
background  and  circumstances,  as  well  as  many  not  so  famous,  such  as
Bobby  Joe  Long.  David  Berkowitz  claimed  to  hear  voices  telling  him  to
kill; Joseph Smith claimed to hear voices telling him to renew Christianity.

Whether  or  not  his  father  truly  believed  he  would  ever  find  gold  and

treasure  using  the  rituals  of  ceremonial  magic,  what  can  be  assumed  as  a
relative certainty is that his young son believed in it wholeheartedly. After
all, his parents seemed to be firm believers and they were religious people
as well, for whom their occult practices were perceived as complementary
—rather than in opposition—to their Christian faith. In fact, Joseph Smith,
Jr.  would  have  been  used  as  a  seer  by  his  father.  The  requirements  for
divining by use of spirits in the old books specified that a young child be
used to gaze into the shew stone or crystal, as such a child was presumed to
have  led  a  chaste  life  and  be  pure  in  thought,  thus  permitting  him  or  her
easier access to the spirit world.

Joseph  took  this  responsibility  very  seriously.  He  heard  of  a  young

woman with a seer stone (a type of rock used as a crystal ball, placed in a
hat and gazed at for long periods of time), who had good results in divining
hidden things. He spent a lot of time trying to learn the art of gazing from
her, and eventually used these practices to discover the existence of his own
seer stone, revealed to him in a vision as being buried beneath a certain tree
or bush. Smith followed the instructions in his vision, proceeded to the tree
and dug up the stone.

As time went on, both Smiths—pere et fils—would become involved in

various rituals of ceremonial magic to the extent that they began to acquire


background image

a  collection  of  books  and  paraphernalia  that  would  be  familiar  to  anyone
dabbling in occult practices today. One of the most popular occult textbooks
of that time was Francis Barrett’s

 

The Magus,

 

which  is  a  compendium  of

magical  belief,  invocations,  occult  diagrams  and  rituals  that  is  as  well
known today as it was two hundred years ago, and which has been reprinted
many  times  in  the  past  thirty  years.  It  is  a  hefty  volume,  and  covers
everything from planetary magic to divination to ritual invocations. Anyone
examining the rituals of the nineteenth century English occult lodge—The
Golden  Dawn—will  find  many  of  the  same  seals,  symbols  and  diagrams
used  by  both  Joseph  Smith  in  1820  and  MacGregor  Mathers  and  Aleister
Crowley  in  1900…  and  by  modern  occult  and  witchcraft  organizations  in
the United States, Europe, Latin America and Australia today. In fact, much
of the information contained in

 

The Magus

 

is a summary of occult rituals

from  the  seventeenth  century  and  earlier.  Those  individuals  credited  by
Dame  Frances  Yates  for  contributing  to  Renaissance  magic—Cornelius
Agrippa  and  Pico  della  Mirandola,  among  others—can  be  found  haunting
the pages of Francis Barrett’s monumental work.

In  fact  there  is  a  continuum  of  practice  and  belief  going  back  in  time

more than two thousand years that runs parallel to the mainstream histories
of Christianity, Judaism and Islam in the West, a continuum of magic and
sorcery: a belief in the possibility of the manipulation of hidden powers by
ordinary  mortals,  provided  that  they  only  have  the  technological
information at hand, and the right equipment. It is actually a very scientific
attitude  towards  understanding  and  working  with  cosmic  principles,
contrary  to  the  opinions  of  skeptics  and  historians.  It  is  a  technology  that
was designed to extend the capability of a person’s five normal senses into a
sixth realm: a technology that acted as a machine to fine tune the powers of
the mind. This technology is so consistent in its general terms and practices
that a magician of today can look upon the texts and instruments of his or
her counterpart of two thousand years ago and figure out what they were up
to.  Furthermore,  the  systems  are  so  internally  consistent  that  we  can
duplicate  these  rituals  exactly  in  every  way  and  gradually  come  to  an
understanding  of  how  they  were  expected  to  work,  an  understanding
probably far in excess of what Joseph Smith could be expected to have, as
the studies of psychology, psychobiology, and biochemistry were nowhere
near  as  advanced  then  as  they  are  today.  Whereas  modern  histories  of


background image

science grudgingly and somewhat sarcastically give credit to the alchemists
of  old  for  having—usually,  according  to  these  historians,  by  “accident”—
created  the  fundamentals  of  chemistry,  no  one  credits  the  ceremonial
magicians  for  their  contribution  (however  “accidental”)  to  modern
knowledge concerning psychology and psychobiology.

The tradition in which the Smiths were working is in the mainstream of

ceremonial magic, and its rudiments can be studied today in works by Israel
Regardie,  MacGregor  Mathers,  A.E.  Waite,  Aleister  Crowley  and  many
others. In fact, Waite’s book—The Book of Ceremonial Magic, sometimes
titled

 

The  Book  of  Black  Magic  and  Pacts—is  a  worthy  competitor  to

Francis Barrett’s volume, and was a familiar sight in Western occult circles
in the 1960s and 1970s. The symbols, magic squares and invocations found
therein can be traced back to the

 

Greater

 

and

 

Lesser Keys of Solomon, the

Enchiridion  of  Pope  Leo,  the

 

Grimoire  of  Pope  Honorious,  and  other

famous magic textbooks of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. They
are the physical remnants of a stream of occult practice and belief known as
“Christian  Cabala,”  which  is  an  amalgam  of  Jewish  mystical  beliefs  and
texts  with  corresponding  Christian  and  Islamic  input.  The  attitude  of
occultists has usually been very pragmatic and open-minded when it comes
to the practices and “discoveries” of occultists of other faiths, much more so
than the true believers of any one faith who find competing faiths anathema,
and their competitors deserving of murder.

Christian  Cabala  came  to  America  with  some  of  the  earliest  settlers.  A

famous German mystic, Johannes Kelpius, settled at the Wissahickon River
near  Philadelphia  with  his  band  of  Pietist  brothers—where  they  practiced
astrology, astronomy magic and alchemy—in 1694, only two years after the
Salem trials. They were a millennialist cult, strictly 

39

in number (no more,

no less) and watched the skies carefully for a sign of the end of the world.

The  Ephrata  community,  also  in  Pennsylvania,  had  its  origins  with  the

Kelpius  group  (known  as  the  “Monks  of  the  Wissahickon”)  and  was
similarly famous for its occult practices, which included ceremonial magic,
astrology,  astronomy,  alchemy  and  Rosicrucian  studies  and  practices.  The
Rosicrucians themselves became known as a result of the publication of the
Fama Fraternitatis

 

in 1614, in which—among other things—they claimed


background image

to  have  their  origin  with  the  mysterious  Christian  Rosenkreutz,  a
philosopher  and  mystic  who  had  traveled  Europe  and  the  Middle  East  in
search  of  esoteric  wisdom  and  who  had  formed  the  Rosicrucian
brotherhood  as  a  repository  of  occult  teachings:  a  secret  society  whose
members would be unknown to the rest of humanity even as they labored
on  humanity’s  behalf.  A  further  publica-tion—The  Chymical  Wedding  of
Christian  Rosenkreutz—
placed  the  mystical  tradition  of  the  Rosicrucians
firmly  in  the  alchemical  and  qabalistic  camp,  in  a  treatise  that  borders  on
Hindu Tantrism.

As  Professor  Quinn  points  out  in  his

 

magnum  opus,  a  wide  variety  of

occult  literature  was  available  to  Joseph  Smith,  even  in  his  otherwise
remote  village  of  Palmyra,  New  York  (near  Canandaigua).  The  works  of
Agrippa, Barrett, Mather and others were routinely stocked in bookstores in
the region, and lists of occult books either in print or available for sale at
second-hand ran to

 

over 100 pages. 42 America at that time—so soon after

the  War  of  1812—was  in  the  midst  of  a  religious  and  mystical  revival,  a
fact  that  is  often  ignored  or  misunderstood  by  general  historians  of  the
American experience. And in the midst of this religious revival was a fear
of  secret  societies  and  their  presumed  ill  intentions  towards  the  young
Republic. Chief among these societies was, of course, the Freemasons.

The  Anti-Masonic  movement  in  America  was  in  its  heyday  at  the  time

that  Joseph  Smith  was  searching  for  buried  treasure  using  ceremonial
magic.  The  kidnap  and  alleged  murder  of  William  Morgan  in  1826
triggered an anti-Masonic backlash in western New York where the Smith
farm  was  located.  Morgan  was  a  Mason  (actually,  his  status  within  the
Masonic  organization  was  somewhat  in  doubt)  who  planned  to  reveal  the
secret  rituals  of  Freemasonry  in  a  book  he  was  writing,  contracted  to  a
small  publisher;  as  a  result,  it  seems  that  some  Masons  felt  it  was
imperative  to  mete  out  the  justice  specified  in  those  very  rituals.  The
printing  office  was  fire-bombed  and  Morgan  was  kidnapped,  that  much
seems  certain.  He  was  admittedly  taken  by  Masons  to  Fort  Niagara,  New
York where he was kept imprisoned for some time. After that, reports vary
as to what eventually became of him. A year later, a body washed up near
Fort  Niagara  that  was  eventually  identified  as  Morgan,  even  though  there
was controversy over this fact as well. In any event, it was characterized as


background image

a cult killing, not the first in America and certainly not the last, but it was
very visible and the results were sweeping.

Masons were forced to explain themselves, and explain their history as a

society,  in  ways  they  had  not  anticipated.  Masons  were  believed  to  be
behind

  secret  movements  to  control  the  operations  of  government  and,

naturally,  the  dreaded  Illuminati  would  be  invoked  as  an  example  of  this
perfidy.  An  Anti-Masonic  Convention  was  held  in  Philadelphia  on
September  11,  1830  which  was  attended  by  such  political  celebrities  as
William  H.  Seward  and  Thaddeus  Stevens  (founders  of  the  Republican
Party after their break with the Whigs, the former of course also responsible
for  the  purchase  of  Alaska  from  Russia  in  1867)  and  Francis  Granger,  an
enemy of Seward in other things (notably on the slavery issue) but a fellow-
traveler  when  it  came  to  the  anti-Masonic  cause.  In  the  ensuing  hysteria
Masonic  membership  dropped  drastically;  many  lodges  were  closed,
virtually  overnight,  and  Masonry  became  a  campaign  issue  in  the  United
States for decades. The 1830s and 1840s saw the growth of an anti-Masonic
political party, as well as general paranoia over the perceived penetration of
the  Masonic  Society  by  the  political  and  anti-Christian  elements  of  the
Illuminati,  thus  rendering  the  Masonic  Society  little  more  than  an  “outer
court”  for  the  inner  workings  of  a  diabolical  European  organization  with
designs on the new American republic.

The Bavarian Illuminati have been covered in so many places in so many

ways  that  it  is  probably  not  worthwhile  to  describe  them  in  detail  here.
Suffice  it  to  say  that  the  Order  was  created  by  one  Adam  Weishaupt,  a
professor  of  theology  at  the  University  of  Ingolstadt,  Bavaria  on  May  1,
1776, as a kind of super-Masonry which attracted many of the intelligentsia
of the day. It was the political machinations of the Illuminati that lead to its
eventual suppression by the Bavarian authorities, but the damage had been
done:  a  secret  mystical  brotherhood,  bound  by  blood  oaths  and  practicing
strange  rites,  had  been  plotting  against  the  government.  It  is  perhaps  no
mere  coincidence  that  Weishaupt’s  Order  was  established  only  a  few
months before the signing of the American Declaration of Independence. It
has been blamed for everything from the French Revolution to the creation
of the Federal Reserve banking system. A true Frankenstein’s monster, born
in  the  same  town  as  the  fictional  Doctor’s  ghastly  experiment  at  creating


background image

life…  and  the  same  town  where,  eventually,  German  automaker  (and
erstwhile warplane manufacturer) BMW would set up shop. As noted, the
Illuminati  were  blamed  for  the  French  Revolution,  among  other  things;
even  Winston  Churchill  would  one  day  cite  the  Illuminati  as  a  dread
presence in world affairs. 

40

None  of  this  stood  in  the  way  of  Joseph  Smith’s  attraction  towards

Freemasonry,  however,  and  he  eventually  became  a  Mason  in  March  of
1842  despite  the  general  outrage  over  the  society.  Both  admirers  and
detractors of Mormonism agree that much of the LDS Church’s ritual and
priesthood structure mimics that of Smith’s Masonic involvement. Why he
would choose to become a Mason in the atmosphere of alarm and paranoia
that surrounded any mention of Masonry in the America of that time is open
to  conjecture;  probably  he  saw  Freemasonry  as  being  sympathetic  to  his
own ideas and background: the arcane rituals, the free-thinking atmosphere,
the  cherishing  of  a  “secret  history”  of  the  world  would  all  have  been
attractive  to  Joseph  Smith.  In  addition,  it  probably  gave  him  a  sense  of
belonging  to  a  society  of  people  who  would  respect  his  higher  intentions
and his intellect at a time when Mormonism was being viewed as a heretical
and possibly dangerous cult.

But  in  1823,  Joseph  Smith  had  not  yet  founded  a  religion.  He  was  a

young  man  desperately  seeking  buried  treasure.  On  the  auspicious  day  of
September 22, 1823 he had a vision of an Angel.

It was the autumnal equinox, the first day of the zodiacal sign of Libra,

and he had repaired to a hill near his home late that night and performed the
rituals  necessary  to  invoke  spiritual  forces.  He  was  gratified  to  obtain  a
vision of the Angel Moroni, who directed him to where a certain treasure
was buried.

Quinn tells us that “Moroni” as a surname meant “dark complexion” or

“swarthy,” which reminds us at once of the Black Man or the Man In Black
of  the  Salem  witch  trials. 

41

This  did  not  necessarily  mean  an  African,  but

could  have  referred  to  any  person  of  swarthy  appearance:  Native
Americans, Meditteraneans, Levantines, etc.


background image

Smith  rushed  to  the  spot  indicated  by  Moroni  and  began  digging.  He

found  the  gold  plates  but,  ignoring  the  Angel’s  demand  that  he  take  the
plates and seek no further, he could not resist looking into the hole he had
dug  to  see  if  there  was  anything  else.  Enraged,  the  Angel  took  back  the
plates and told Smith if he wanted to see them again he should return the
following year on the same day and at the same time, and should bring his
older brother.

Chagrined,  he  returned  to  his  home  and  related  some  of  what  had

transpired.

And the following year, he tried again. The problem, however, was that

his older brother had died a few months after the first attempt at the plates.
Smith repaired to the same spot at the same time as indicated by Moroni,
and  Moroni  put  him  off  again.  All  in  all  it  would  take  three  more  years
before—on September 22, 1827—he would finally be able to see the plates
again and to begin transcribing what has become the

 

Book of Mormon.

The  method  of  transcribing  the  plates—which,  according  to  the  story,

were written in a kind of Egyptian hieroglyphic—would seem odd to many
Americans  but  familiar  to  occultists  and  those  familiar  with  occult
literature. Smith would place his “shew stone” or “seer stone” in his hat and
then  bring  his  face  into  the  hat  so  that  no  light  would  enter  his  field  of
vision. There, with his hands on his knees and staring into his hat, he would
begin to dictate the pages of the

 

Book.

This method is called “skrying” and was used by Elizabethan astrologer,

occultist and spy John Dee in the sixteenth century, as well as by legions of
fortune  tellers,  crystal  gazers,  magicians  and  soothsayers  for  millennia.
John Dee, in fact, received his famous system of Enochian magic in roughly
this manner. His shew stone—a piece of what appears to be polished Aztec
obsidian—can be found at the British Museum.

Many  devout  Mormons  have  a  problem  with  this  story,  as  it  makes

Joseph  Smith  appear  to  be  little  more  than  a  sorcerer  or  wizard.  This  is
certainly  the  point  of  view  one  takes  today,  looking  back  on  events  that
occurred  nearly  two  hundred  years  ago,  but  it  is  perhaps  slightly  in  error.
The practices of ceremonial magic, skrying, divining, and all the rest were


background image

taking place side-by-side with intense religious feeling. Magic was believed
to  be  an  extension  of  religion,  and  not  in  opposition  to  it.  Thus,  we  have
many clergymen, scientists, and political leaders involved in those days in
practices  that  can  only  seem  unsavory  today.  To  be  sure,  many  strict
fundamentalists opposed the practice of magic, fearing that it would lead to
the  excesses  of  witchcraft  and  demon-worship.  But  to  the  farmer,  the
villager,  the  blacksmith,  these  practices  were  based  on  a  system  of
knowledge  that  was  gleaned  from  the  stars  and  the  phases  of  the  moon,
things  of  nature,  things  that  regulated  their  lives  anyway  and  told  them
when to plant and when to harvest. It would be difficult to tell a farmer to
ignore the phases of the moon, and to place no stock in the almanacs that
had become part of his life at least since the time of Benjamin Franklin and
“Poor Richard.”

Indeed,  as  Professor  Valerie  I.J.  Flint  reminds  us—when  discussing  the

role  of  Simon  Magus  in  early  Christian  literature  and  his  widely  reported
magical  wars  with  Saint  Peter—in

 

The  Rise  of  Magic  in  Early  Medieval

Europe,

Some supernatural exercises are neither admissible nor praiseworthy; but

some  are  both….  Magical  ability  is  expected  of  a  great  religious  leader;
objections  arise  only  when  he  uses  it  in  unacceptable  ways  and  for
unacceptable ends. 

42

And again,

The harnessing of magical abilities to selfish ends renders the practice of

magic  wholly  objectionable.  …but  magical  powers  of  a  wide  variety
emerge from the Simon literature as legitimate, provided only that they are
employed for clear benefit of human beings.

 

They may even be necessary to

humanity

43

(emphasis added)

“They may even be necessary to humanity.” We will come back to this

concept a bit later on, but at the moment we can summarize our findings as
follows: that the origins of Mormonism lie in the most blatant practice of
ritual ceremonial magic, a practice that was never denied or abandoned by
either  Smith  or  his  proteges,  as  we  can  see  by  Quinn’s  pioneering  study;
that  this  blend  of  Christian  religion  and  European  ceremonial  magic  was


background image

common  in  America  at  that  time  (Quinn  goes  so  far  as  to  call  it  “folk
magic”);  and,  finally  and  “coincidentally,”  that  we  have  ancestors  of  the
Smith family itself deeply involved in the Salem witch trials.

And we have Joseph Smith himself, years later, running for President of

the United States and imprisoned in Carthage, Illinois in 1844. By this time
he  has  become  a  Mason,  has  formed  his  new  religion,  has  become  the
commander of a huge state militia (the largest in the country at the time),
has become mayor of one of Illinois’s largest communities, has continued
the  quest  for  buried  treasures  (both  of  the  material  and  of  the  spiritual
worlds,  we  assume,  and  at  least  one  such  quest  took  him  back  to  his
ancestral home in Salem, Massachusetts), has married numerous times, has
established temples where his new religion could thrive… and, in a frenzy
of fear and paranoia at the growing power of this latter-day Prophet, he is
murdered by an angry mob on June 27.

He  was  wearing  his  Jupiter  amulet  at  the  time  of  his  death,  a  photo  of

which can be seen in Quinn’s book.

44

It was incorrectly engraved.

The  Hebrew  characters  on  top  of  the  magic  square  of  Jupiter  in  the

original—to  be  found  in

 

The  Magus

 

and  other  places—reads  “AL  AB,”

which means “The Father” and which is a holy name of Jupiter, which was
Smith’s ruling planet.

Unfortunately for Smith, his talisman is missing the final “B” character.

Thus, the characters are A. L A, which in Hebrew means “but” or “only” or
“except,”  a  preposition  instead  of  the  Divine  Name  of  Jupiter.  As  any
authority  will  tell  you,  one  must  be  faithful  to  every  letter  and  mark  in  a
grimoire and not edit the words, the signs or seals lest disaster befall. The
other  characters  of  the  seal  are  correct,  with  one  word  being  “ABA”  or
“Father” and the other “YHPYAL” or “Johphiel,” which is the “Intelligence
of Jupiter.” With AL AB reduced to the preposition ALA, we are tempted to
read  the  seal  as  “Father  except  Johphiel,”  certainly  a  distressing
combination implying that Johphiel is nowhere present.


background image

The  word  “YHPYAL”  according  to  Hebrew  Qabala  (cabala,  kabbala,

etc.) adds to the number 136, the same number on the seal of Jupiter which
is a magic square, the sum of whose numbers in any row add to 136. The
word “ABA” adds to four. The word “ALA” adds to thirty-two. It should
have been “AL AB” which would have resulted in thirty-four, for a grand
total of 174. With the error in AL AB and reducing it to ALA, the total is
172.

According  to

 

Liber  777,  which  is  a  famous  compendium  of  qabalistic

numerology begun by the Golden Dawn and later compiled and printed by
Aleister  Crowley,  we  read  that  the  value  of  the  number  174  will  give  us
“Torches” and

 

“Splendor ei per circuitum,”

 

a pleasant enough attribution.

The valuation for 172, however, gives us “Cut, divided” and “The heel, the
end.” 

45

And so it was for Joseph Smith.

One is tempted, in the light of Smith’s violent end at the hands of a mob,

to look at his death in another, even more poetic, way. He was, after all, the
descendent  of  men  who,  at  Salem,  accused  women  of  witchcraft  and  saw
them hanged. Like something out of Nathaniel Hawthorne (himself a Salem
native), the sins of the father were visited on his children, and his children’s
children. Perhaps, with a bit of literary license and a nod at Hawthorne, we
may say of Joseph Smith that “God gave him blood to drink.”

Mormonism  did  not  end  with  him,  of  course.  The  banner  of  leadership

was taken up by Brigham Young, and the flight west begun. Eventually the
Mormons would settle in what is now Utah, and make their headquarters at
the side of the Great Salt Lake. But it would be years before Mormonism
was  viewed  as  respectable  and  conservative.  Polygamy  was  one  issue,  of
course,  and  the  Mormons  were  forced  to  abandon  the  practice  (at  least
officially and formally). But there had been violent confrontations between
Mormons and non-Mormons, and even between Mormons themselves. For
years they were perceived as a cult, just as David Koresh’s experiment in
Waco or Jim Jones’ failed commune in the jungles of Guyana. Sir Arthur
Conan Doyle is perhaps the best-known representative of this point of view.
His very first Sherlock Holmes story—in which Watson and Holmes meet
—is  about  the  Mormons,  with  shadings  of  European  occultism,  secret


background image

societies  and,  of  course,  murder.

 

A  Study  In  Scarlet

 

has  a  long,  set-piece

study of Mormonism, as Conan Doyle understood it and as it would have
been familiar to his readers when published in 1887. Of course, for Conan
Doyle’s English readers, Mormonism was probably just another example of
American foolishness at best, or sinister cult behavior at worse. Yet we see
in this famous story an introduction to Sherlock Holmes, to Doctor Watson,
to the concept of crime detection using the powers of deduction based on
available  evidence,  to  the  paranormal,  to  murder,  to  cults,  and  to  a
specifically  American  cult.  With  the  retrospect  possible  after  over  one
hundred  years  since  the  initial  publication  of  the  story,  we  can  see  how
really  remarkable  is  this  first  attempt  at  popular  crime  fiction.  It  wove
together many of the threads that would interest Conan Doyle for years to
come and, in its own way, is concerned with themes that are as modern as
today’s tabloid headlines and trash-talk reality shows.

That  Holmes  and  Watson  are  obviously  the  prototypes  for  Mulder  and

Scully  respectively  of  television’s

 

X-Files

 

fame  needs  no  further

explanation beyond this: both pairs are involved in crime detection, one is a
doctor  who  records  his/her  observations  after  each  case,  the  other  is  a
visionary, an eccentric who pursues his own peculiar

 

modus operandi

 

in the

effort to capture the evil-doers, and both have a Dr. Moriarty in their past: in
Holmes’s  case,  it  is  the  evil  genius  who  is  at  the  heart  of  all  crime  in
London  if  not  all  of  Europe,  a  personal  nemesis  who  nearly  succeeds  in
killing him; in Mulder’s case, it is the government itself—or some frantic
faction thereof—which is responsible for the kidnapping or abduction of his
sister, and which nearly succeeds in killing him.

The  influence  of  Mormonism  does  not  end  here,  however.  It  comes  up

again  and  again  in  the  course  of  American  history,  as  we  discover  the
Mormon relationship to Howard Hughes, and Mormon involvement in the
Watergate scandal.

46

 This is not an attempt to smear the Mormon church or

the  Mormon  organization  in  any  way;  this

 

is

 

an  attempt,  however,  to

examine  how  religious  and  occult  beliefs  have  influenced—and,  at  times,
controlled—political events in America, and Mormonism has a lot to offer
us by way of example.


background image

Today, many Mormons are conscious that there is an effort underway to

discredit  their  belief  by  means  of  proving  that  many  deeply-held
convictions  are  based  on  deception  or  blatant  lies.  Attempts  to  conceal
Joseph Smith’s magical practices are only one alleged example; another is
the  assertion  of  the  actual  existence  of  the  golden  plates  from  which  the
Book of Mormon

 

was transcribed, and of the historical accuracy (or lack of

accuracy) afforded by the analysis of those transcriptions.

In the 1940s, a devout Mormon began an archaeological quest to prove,

once  and  for  all,  the  literal  truth  of  the

 

Book  of  Mormon.  Thomas  Stuart

Ferguson,  a  lawyer  from  California,  decided  to  prove  that  the  historical
elements contained within the

 

Book of Mormon

 

were verifiable. He wished

to prove that the

 

Book

 

was true and, therefore, that the religion was true by

extension. Since Smith had received the golden plates from an Angel, and
since Smith had not visited the lands described in the

 

Book of Mormon, it

was  logical  to  assume  that  if  the

 

Book

 

was  correct,  then  Smith’s  angelic

experiences and visions of the plates and the ensuing transcriptions were all
true, or at least proof of extraordinary spiritual powers or gifts.

The widespread belief in some Mormon circles at the time was that the

lands referred to in the

 

Book

 

were located somewhere in Central America or

Mexico.  Ferguson  felt  similarly  inclined,  and  undertook  expeditions  to
these  areas  in  anticipation  of  discovering  physical  evidence  for  the
geography outlined in the

 

Book. After several false starts, Ferguson slowly

came to believe that he was wasting his time. The discovery of some Aztec,
Maya and Olmec sites that seemed to parallel descriptions in the

 

Book

 

were

later invalidated when it was shown that these civilizations (or, at least, the
specific  sites  referenced)  came  into  being  much  later  than  the  chronology
given in the Book.

Archaeologists  were  quick  to  point  out  that  there  was  no  evidence  to

support  a  claim  that  Near  Eastern  groups  had  established  communities  in
the  New  World,  that  there  was  no  linguistic  or  other  cultural  evidence  to
support any cross-fertilization of Levantine and Ancient Mexican religious
or  racial  groups,  and  that  the

 

Book  of  Mormon

 

added  nothing  to  what

archaeologists knew of Aztec, Mayan, Toltec, Olmec or any other ancient
New World civilizations. If the

 

Book of Mormon

 

was true in any historical


background image

sense, the basic premise seemed to be in error: the events described could
not have taken place in Mexico or Central America.

The  last  straw  came  in  November  1967  with  the  revelation  that  certain

Egyptian papyri—which had been in Smith’s possession and from which he
“translated” the Book of Abraham (included in the LDS scripture

 

The Pearl

of  Great  Price)—had  been  discovered.  Ferguson  was  eager  to  have  the
papyri  translated  by  non-Mormon  Egyptologists.  When  they  were,  the
documents were shown to be versions of the Egyptian

 

Book of the Dead

 

and

had nothing at all to do with any Mormon scripture.

Ferguson died on March 16, 1983, of a heart attack while playing tennis.

By that time he had given up all hope of proving the historical claims of the
Mormon  scriptures,  but  had  reconciled  himself  to  the  fellowship  of  the
Church  and  an  embrace  of  its  moral  principles.  He  admitted  that  Joseph
Smith was a “smart fellow,” but stopped short of calling him a charlatan or

a con-man.

47

From the first voyage of Columbus to the land of the Arawaks on a quest

for  a  fast  route  to  Jerusalem;  from  the  witchcraft  trials  of  Salem,
Massachusetts involving Arawak descendant Tituba and later manifesting in
the magic and occultism of Salem descendant Joseph Smith; from European
mysticism  to  American  “folk  magic”  and  stories  of  murderous  cults  and
demon  worshippers  in  the  seventeenth  and  eighteenth  centuries;  from  all
this  we  can  begin  to  perceive  a  different  sort  of  American  history.  As
Americans,  we  have  been  moving  too  fast  and  forgetting  too  much  to
realize that we have a unique cultural contribution to make, one that unites
religion  with  mysticism  at  the  very  bedrock  of  human  experience…  and
then  transforms  this  alchemical  tincture  into  a  political  and  scientific
Philosopher’s  Stone  capable  of  causing  tremendous  change  in  the  human
psyche. Such an effort was, indeed, attempted by some of the best minds of
the last generation.

Thus  the  story  of  the

 

Book  of  Mormon

 

is  not  the  end  of  our  quest,

because it poses more questions than it answers. What did Joseph Smith see
in the woods that night in 1823? What was the actual source of the

 

Book of

Mormon

 

if  it  was,  indeed,  a  total  fabrication?  Were  there  any  advanced

civilizations  in  America—other  than  those  in  Central  America—which


background image

predated  Columbus  and  which  would  have  fit  the  Mormon  chronicles  of
early American settlement?

Most importantly of all, for the next phase of our research: who built the

Ashland mounds?

 

1

 

H.P. Lovecraft, “The Dunwich Horror,”

 

The Annotated Lovecraft, S.T. Joshi, Dell, NY, 1997, p. 105

2

 

Joyce Carol Oates,

 

Tales of H.P. Lovecraft, The Ecco Press, NY, 2000

 

3

 

Several stories by Borges were inspired by Lovecraft, including “Funes the Memorious” and “Tlon,

Uqbar, Orbis, Tertius,” as well as a story published in

 

The Atlantic Monthly some years ago.

 

4

 

Most  of  Grant’s  published  work  refers  to  Lovecraft,  especially

 

Outer  Gateways,  Cults  of  the

Shadow, etc. See Bibliography for a complete listing.

5

 

Note, for instance, Surah 5/13, 5/51, 5/57, 5/64-66, 9/30, 62/6-8, etc.

 

6

 

10 Washington Irving,

 

Tales of the Alhambra, Editorial Escudo de Oro, Barcelona, p. 3

 

7

 

Christopher Columbus,

 

The Diario of Christopher Columbus’s First Voyage to America 1492-1493,

Dunn and Kelley, University of Oklahoma Press, 1991, p. 290-1

 

8

 

Irving, op. cit., p. 57

 

9

 

Oates, op. cit., p. 229

 

10

 

Burr, George Lincoln, ed.

 

Narratives of the Witchcraft Cases 1648-1706, Scribner’s, NY, 1914, p.

41-52

 

11

 

Ibid., p. 47

 

12

 

Demos,  John  Putnam,

 

Entertaining  Satan:  Witchcraft  and  the  Culture  of  Early  New  England,

Oxford, 1983, pp. 402-409

 

13

 

Morton, Thomas,

 

Revels in New Canaan, 1637, reprinted in Albert Bushnell Hart, ed.

 

American

History Told by Contemporaries, NY, 1898, volume 1, pp 361-63

 

14

 

Ibid.

 

15

 

William Bradford,

 

History of Plymouth Plantation, 1620-1647, Boston, 1912, Vol. 2, pp. 45-57

 


background image

16

 

Cotton Mather,

 

Wonders of the Invisible World, 1693

 

17

 

21 D. Michael Quinn,

 

Early Mormonism and the Magic World View, Signature Books, Salt Lake

City, 1998, p. 10

 

18

 

Ibid., p. 10

19

 

23 Washington Irving, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” in

 

Ronald Curran, Witches, Wraiths and

Warlocks, Fawcett, NY, 1988, ISBN 0-449-30061-7, p. 216

 

20

 

Cotton Mather,

 

Wonders of the Invisible World, 1693

 

21

 

Ibid.

 

22

 

Ibid.

 

23

 

Ibid.

 

24

 

Chadwick Hansen,

 

Witchcraft at Salem, George Braziller, NY, 1992, p. 1-3

 

25

 

Ibid., p. 11

 

26

 

Ibid., p. 86

 

27

 

Ibid., pp. 18-19

 

28

 

Diagnostic  and  Statistical  Manual  of  Mental  Disorders

 

(Third  Edition),  American  Psychiatric

Association,

 

29

 

Hansen, op. cit., p. 17

30

 

In Hansen, op.cit., p. 17

 

31

 

Hansen, op. cit., p. 90

 

32

 

Ibid., p. 97

 

33

 

Ibid., p. 97

 

34

 

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle,

 

The Complete Sherlock Holmes, Magpie Books, London, 1993, p. 86

 

35

 

D. Michael Quinn, op. cit., p. 118 and elsewhere. Quinn gives a lengthy argument in this chapter

concerning the ready availability of

 

The Magus

 

(and other famous occult texts) to the Smith family,

and their use of these documents in works of ceremonial magic.

 


background image

36

 

Ibid., p. 31

 

37

 

Ibid., p. 261-264

 

38

 

See Steven Naifeh & Gregory White Smith,

 

The Mormon Murders, Onyx, NY, 1989, ISBN 0-451-

40152-2 for the definitive history of the 1985 Mark Hoffmann case in Salt Lake City, Utah.

 

39

 

Ibid., p. 91

 

40

 

Winston  Churchill,  in  a  statement  published  in  the

 

Illustrated  Sunday  Herald

 

of  Feb.  8,  1920,

famously  announced,  “From  the  days  of  Sparticus-Weishaupt  to  those  of  Karl  Marx,  to  those  of
Trotsky,  Bela  Kuhn,  Rosa  Luxembourg  and  Emma  Goldman,  this  world-wide  conspiracy  has  been
steadily growing. This conspiracy played a definitely recognizable role in the tragedy of the French
Revolution.  It  has  been  the  main-spring  of  every  subversive  movement  in  the  19th  Century…”
Sparticus-Weishaupt is, of course, Adam Weishaupt, the founder of the Illuminati, whose name in the
Order  was  “Spartacus.”  George  Washington  also  references  the  Illuminati  in  one  of  his  letters:  “It
was not my intention to doubt that the doctrine of the Illuminati and the principles of Jacobinism had
not  spread  to  the  United  States.  On  the  contrary,  no  one  is  more  satisfied  of  this  fact  than  I  am.”
Washington  and  Churchill  thus  give  us  two  completely  different  value  judgments—one  from  the
revolutionary  and  fiercely  independent  Colonies  and  one  from  the  voice  of  the  Colonizer—on  the
existence and purpose of the Illuminati.

 

41

 

Quinn, op. cit., p. 155

 

42

 

Valerie I.J. Flint,

 

The Rise of Magic in Early Medieval Europe, Princeton, 1991,

 

p. 339

43

 

Ibid., p. 342

 

44

 

Quinn, op. cit., Figure 28a

 

45

 

Aleister Crowley,

 

777  and  Other  Qabalistic  Writings  of  Aleister  Crowley,  Samuel  Weiser,  York

Beach, 1986, “Sepher Sephiroth,” p. 23

 

46

 

This has been investigated at length by Jerald and Sandra Tanner, Mormon dissidents who figure

prominently in the Mark Hoffmann case and who publish Mormon criticism through their Lighthouse
Ministry. See for instance

 

Mormon Spies, Hughes, and the CIA, Lighthouse Ministry, Salt Lake City,

1976. Sandra Tanner herself is a direct descendant of Brigham Young.

 

47

 

Stan Larson,

 

Quest for the Gold Plates: Thomas Stuart Ferguson’s Archaeological Search for the

Book of Mormon, Freethinker Press, Salt Lake City, 1996

 


background image

C

HAPTER

 

T

WO

T

HE

 

M

OUNTAINS OF

 

M

ADNESS

:

A

MERICAN

 

P

REHISTORY AND THE

O

CCULT

To wrangle the Devil out of the country, will be truly a new experiment: Alas! we are not aware of the
Devil,  if  we  do  not  think,  that  he  aims  at  inflaming  us  one  against  another;  and  shall  we  suffer
ourselves  to  be  Devil-ridden?  or  by  any  unadvisableness  contribute  unto  the  widening  of  our
breaches?

— Cotton Mather 

1

Religious insanity is very common in the United States.

— Alexis de Tocqueville

 

2

I

t was a cheap apartment in a small Appalachian town, and the sitting room

was full of blood. The body had been savagely attacked, and bore nineteen
separate  stab  wounds.  The  attack  was  so  passionate,  so  bestial,  that  the
murder  weapon—a  kitchen  knife—was  still  in  the  body,  pinning  it  to  the
floor.

It  might  have  been  a  love  affair  gone  terribly  wrong.  People  from

Ashland, Kentucky have been known to get emotional, even irrational, over
love and the promises of love and the mistaken assumptions of love and its
follies, like a town out of a country and western song.

Or  it  might  have  been  something  else.  Something  more  sinister.  A

warning, borne of a hatred so deep and a malevolence so strong that slain
flesh and spilled blood were only symbols—mere tokens—of its power.

The  victim  was  a  nobody.  An  ex-con,  once  convicted  of  writing  bad

checks. A man down on his luck, working for a trucking company.

He had been stabbed in a fury of nineteen slashing, slivering strokes—in

a  wood  frame  house  in  the  middle  of  the  night  or  the  early  hours  of  the
morning on a side street in a small country town—and no one heard a thing.


background image

The  perpetrator  left  no  clues,  no  identifiable  fingerprints,  nothing.  The

body  might  have  lain  there  for  days,  except  that  the  victim’s  co-worker
stopped by to see why he hadn’t shown up for work that morning. The body
was found. The police were called.

The officer who responded to that call and who was the first policeman at

the  scene  is  today  the  Chief  of  Police  of  Ashland,  Kentucky.  The  murder
took place in 1969. He told me it remains unsolved—and the murder open
on the books—to this day. 

3

The victim’s name was Darwin Scott. He was the brother of one Colonel

Scott.  Colonel  Scott  had  been  sued—successfully—for  paternity  of  a  boy,
one “No Name Maddox,” by a girlfriend and sometime prostitute, Kathleen
Maddox.  No  Name  Maddox  would  soon  be  known  by  another  name.
Charles Manson.

Darwin Scott was Charles Manson’s uncle.

His murder took place in May. In August, the Sharon Tate and LaBianca

murders would occur in Los Angeles. In December, Charles Manson would
be  charged  along  with  several  of  his  associates  for  those  crimes.  Crimes
committed with knives. Crimes that turned beautiful Hollywood people into
corpses, beautiful Hollywood homes into abattoirs awash in gore. Manson
would be convicted of those crimes. But no one was ever arrested for the
murder of Darwin Scott, his uncle.

 

MANHATTAN TRANSFER

N

ixon  was  president,  and  the  Vietnam  War  was  in  full  swing.  The  Tet

Offensive  of  January  1968  had  occurred  the  previous  year,  and  Walter
Cronkite had bitched about it on network TV. The Days of Rage had flamed
in Chicago, and Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated, Martin Luther King,
Jr.  was  assassinated,  Marcus  Garvey  was  assassinated,  Malcolm  X  was
assassinated,  the  Weathermen  were  plotting  against  banks  and  Army
recruiting  stations,  and  I  was  on  the  telephone,  talking  to  someone  at  the
headquarters of the Presbyterian Church in New York City, when I heard a
blast and the tinkling sound of breaking glass as my party shouted at me,


background image

“There’s been a bomb! I have to hang up!” The Weathermen had blown up
a brownstone in Greenwich Village in Manhattan, across the street from the
church. It was an accident, a bomb-making enterprise gone wrong. It would
be years before one of the surviving Weathermen would give herself up to
the authorities.

But  still  we  had  not  heard  of  Charles  Manson.  That  would  happen  in

December of 1969. I turned 19 the day he was arrested: that tiny terrorist
dragged fuming and sneering from a crawl space under a wooden cabinet in
the desert, but we would not know that he was the supposed mastermind of
the  Tate/LaBianca  killings  for  some  weeks  yet.  And  he  would  not  be
convicted for many months more, after one of his own attorneys died under
mysterious  circumstances.  By  that  time,  I  had  taken  a  job  with  a  lingerie
company in Manhattan’s Garment District.

Stardust was founded by a man named Brandt. His son, Steven Brandt,

was a Hollywood gossip columnist at the time of the Manson killings, and
one  of  the  witnesses  at  Sharon  Tate’s  marriage  to  Roman  Polanski.  He
would return to New York in panic, phone up his friends at Andy Warhol’s
Factory,  and  then  commit  suicide  in  a  hotel  room  before  his  friend  Ultra
Violet could get there in time. He thought there had been a hit list, and he
thought  he  was  on  it.  All  because  of  the  Manson  Family.  Stardust.  The
company’s  Los  Angeles  location  appeared  in  a  Jack  Lemmon  film,

 

Save

The Tiger.

Other people connected to Manson and his ad hoc cult exploded out of

California  in  the  aftermath  of  the  Tate/LaBianca  killings,  and  wound  up
dead—murders or suicides—all over the world. This would tend to support
the theory that there was more to the Manson “Family” than sex, drugs and
rock  and  roll.  But  at  19,  I  was  more  concerned  about  earning  a  paycheck
from my first real job than I was about the inner workings of a madman’s
fantasies in California, a place I had never been. I was also worried about
Vietnam, and the possibility that I would wind up slogging through the tall
grass, humping a BAR and sweating tears and blood in the tropical jungles.

At  Stardust,  I  was  befriended  by  a  former  model,  a  tall,  exotic  beauty

with  a  warped  sense  of  humor.  We  got  along  well,  and  she  invited  me
several times to the apartment she shared with her musician boyfriend. We


background image

talked about a lot of things, typical New York topics: music and movies and
books. We rarely discussed politics, but when I asked her about her former
life  as  a  model,  she  revealed  her  previous  connections  to  people  involved
with the Howard Hughes organization. She would tell me that Hughes had
been kidnapped.

A few months later, Clifford Irving would tell the world that he had been

secretly  interviewing  Hughes  and  would  write  the  only  authorized
biography of the hermit billionaire. It was eventually denounced as a hoax,
but  under  very  bizarre  circumstances:  Hughes  holding  a  press  conference
by telephone, his metallic voice denouncing the Irving book from a small
box in the center of the room.

I urged the model to come forward and tell what she knew. Horrified, she

refused. She said to do that would put her life in danger. We never discussed
it again.

Hughes. Nixon. Vietnam. Manson. Hollywood.

Then  the  Craig  Karpel  series  in  the

 

Village  Voice,

 

and  it  all  came

together.

And there were more revelations.

Richard Helms admitted there had been something going on at the CIA

called  MK-ULTRA,  which  was  an  attempt  to  probe  the  secrets  of  the
hu

man mind in an effort to produce the perfect assassin and to counteract

the enemy’s brainwashing efforts.

Then there were the Son of Sam killings. The Jonestown massacre. John

Lennon  murdered  by  a  man  holding  a  copy  of

 

Catcher  in  the  Rye, a man

who had prayed to Satan only hours before.

The  bodies—and  the  cults—were  piling  up.  And  my  research  was

outrunning  me.  Every  time  I  thought  I  had  enough  to  start  work  on  the
book,  more  bizarre  stories  appeared  linking  government  agencies  and
psychological  operations,  cult  infiltrations,  organized  crime,  banking
scandals, serial murder, drug trafficking…


background image

There  was  the

 

Propaganda  Due

 

scandal  in  Italy.  A  Masonic  society

involved with assassinations and terror bombings, Latin American dictators
and neo-Nazis, linked to the Church.

Then there was Iran-Contra. The BCCI scandal. Koreagate. It just never

stopped.

And  then  there  was  the  book  by  respected  historian,  Ladislas  Farago,

Aftermath,

 

about  escaped  Nazi  war  criminals  living  in  South  America.

Farago’s most shocking revelation—to me—was not his claim that Martin
Bormann had escaped and was living in Brazil, but the fact that the Roman
Catholic Church had been intimately involved in helping the Nazis escape
to  South  America,  even  disguising  some  as  priests.  It  was  that  book  that
sent  me  to  Chile  in  1979  during  the  height  of  the  Pinochet  regime  and
martial  law,  while  doing  research  on  the  Nazi  use  of  occult  and  mystical
ideas,  a  trip  that  contributed  to  my  first  book,Unholy  Alliance

4

I  had

originally  intended

 

Unholy  Alliance

 

to  be  only  a  chapter  of  the  present

book, but as usual the research outran me. In this case, however, I was not
able  to  outrun  the  research:  I  was  detained  by  German  nationals  at  the
infamous Colonia Dignidad in Chile and only allowed to leave the torture
and interrogation center when it was determined that killing me would be
too risky and would perhaps endanger the Colony’s most esteemed guests,
renegade Nazis on the run from justice.

But  it  wasn’t  only  about  government  conspiracies  and  cover-ups.  This

book became a personal and a spiritual quest as well. Links and connections
took me to the Dead Sea Scrolls and questions about the legitimacy of all
the  teaching  to  which  I  had  been  exposed  as  a  young  Roman  Catholic  in
New  York  and  Chicago.  Books  like

 

Holy  Blood,  Holy  Grail

 

purported  to

give  a  completely  different  history  of  the  origins  of  Christianity  and
specifically  of  the  Catholic  Church.  Did  Jesus  have  a  family?  Are  his
descendants  living  in  Europe  today?  And  what  about  the  Gospel  of  St.
Thomas (so prominent in the recent horror film,Stigmata) ? Does it deserve
a place in the Christian Bible, as respected as the other four Gospels? Was it
suppressed by the Church? If so, why?

And,  finally,  what  about  the  reality  of  spiritual  experience?  Are  saints

and  madmen  equally  deluded?  Are  witches’  sabbats  the  same  as  alien


background image

abductions? Is exorcism merely a form of psychotherapy, or is it something
more? Something… other? What is evil? Can everything we experience as
human  beings  be  explained  away  by  a  tranquil,  Carl  Sagan-like  belief  in
science? Was Carl comforted in his final moments by reciting the Second
Law  of  Thermodynamics…  or  by  a  remembered  prayer  of  childhood?  Is
science a “candle in the dark”?… Or is it simply whistling in the dark?

If Church and State are not separate in reality, in the world of action, then

where does Science stand? Is it an outgrowth of the Church, and a tool of
the State? Or does the answer lie in the cults, the secret societies, the occult
orders  of  yesterday  and  today?  What  did  the  CIA  learn  during  its  long
investigation of psychology and the paranormal? Why did they shred all the
documentation of this that they could find?

These  and  similar,  equally  disturbing  questions  kept  me  awake  at  odd

hours of the night since that month in 1975 when I read the Craig Karpel
series. After Bendix, I had a series of jobs in New York that eventually led
me  to  travel  extensively  throughout  the  United  States  and  the  world.  I’ve
spent a lot of time in South America, the Caribbean, Europe, Australia and
especially in Asia, where the line between religion and politics is very fine
indeed, and sometimes—such as in Indonesia or Malaysia—non-existent. I
visited  temples,  shrines,  mosques,  churches,  hounforts,  cemeteries,
séances…  and  archives,  libraries,  document  collections,  government
offices,  factories,  military  bases,  and  prisons.  I  came  to  know—often  by
utter and complete accident—many figures and organizations that appear in
the pages that follow. I discovered the FBI file on my late father; I worked
with a famous spy, a former colleague of

 

E. Howard Hunt and employee of

the  Hughes  public  relations  firm,  Robert  Mullen.  And  some  clergymen  I
knew  numbered  suspected  JFK  co-conspirator  David  Ferrie  among  their
hierarchy.

I finally decided, then, to visit the place where my story begins. The town
that  Charles  Manson  called  home  for  the  first  years  of  his  life.  The  town
where his uncle had been murdered, by person or persons unknown. I had to
find some way to bring all this information together, to connect it in some
logical fashion, to make it make sense. There was no linear chronology, no
neat historical pattern. Rather, the information I collated was so intertwined
that it appeared more like a spiderweb than a timeline. People who should


background image

not have been connected, were. Events that should not have been connected
touched each other through improbable links. How was this possible? How
did it happen that when I pulled the strings of my own life history, I found
tendrils reaching to the farthest ends of assassination and conspiracy?

I hoped the answer would somehow lie in Ashland, Kentucky.

There  is  an  ancient  America  that  lurks  beneath  the  threshold  of  our
collective,  corn-fed  consciousness.  We  see  it  all  the  time.  It  surrounds  us
with its feral glow; we have learned to fear it in the dark without learning
what it is, what
it means. It’s not just the woods out back, the lonely desert trails, the virgin
mountains  where  we  lose  our  Boy  Scouts  or  survivalists  in  the  winter
snows.  It’s  also  in  the  laundromats,  the  gas  stations,  the  drug  stores  and
diners.

“I think you say ‘convenience store.’ We lived above it.”

—Twin Peaks

 

5

It’s in our standing stones, our Anasazi ruins, our Indian burial mounds. It’s
the remains of the Old Ones, the original people, the deep ancestors of our
forgotten  history,  the  history  before  Columbus  that  is  never  taught  in  the
schools  because  we  don’t  know  it  ourselves…  because  we  don’t  want  to
know, don’t want to accept what has been proved so many times in the past:
that this land of ours is haunted by the ghosts of races who lived and died
on our land thousands of years before we came, and of races we ourselves
exterminated  with  fire  and  sword  and  virus.  There  were  vast  cities  here
before  us,  huge  temples  dwarfing  the  Colosseum,  the  Parthenon,  the
Pyramids  of  Gizeh,  some  built  long  before  any  of  these  more  famous
structures  were  even  dreamed.  There  were  Norsemen  here  before  us,
bringing  paganism  and  the  worship  of  Nordic  gods.  There  were  Irishmen
here  before  us,  bringing  a  strange  mixture  of  Catholicism  and  druidism,
standing  up  their  stones  and  sighting  along  the  solstices  years  before  the
Nina,  Pinta  and  Santa  Maria.  There  were  Carthaginians  here  before  us,
Phoenician traders, perhaps even Buddhists from China. All the votes aren’t
in,  yet.  We  don’t  know  why  there  are  stones  engraved  with  ancient
alphabets, buried in our farmland. We don’t know how they got there, so we
file  these  petroglyphs  along  with  tales  of  sea  serpents  and  great  white
whales… in the land of fantasy that is the bull’s eye target of our scientists.


background image

And we whisper ourselves to sleep like the voice-over on a late night talk
show while the gloom gathers outside our windows and doors and the dead
Indians,  the  dead  Phoenicians,  the  dead  Norsemen  chant  their  ancient
mantras to rob us of our dreams.
Welcome to American prehistory.
 
AMERICA, B.C.

T

here are two general approaches to the study of human habitation on the

North  and  South  American  continents  before  the  arrival  of  the  people  we
think  of  as  Native  Americans.  The  most  accepted  view  is  that  of  the
“independent  inventionists”:  archaeologists  and  anthropologists  who
believe  that  both  continents  were  peopled  by  a  race  that  came  from
Northern Asia, from what is now Russia (or, perhaps, parts of China or even
Southeast Asia according to one school) and who walked across the Bering
Straits (when they were frozen solid) and followed the coast down Alaska
and into Canada and spread out from there as far east and south as the land
mass allowed. In other words, all Native Americans are descendants of this
group of wanderers from the frozen wastes of Siberia—a group known as
the  Clovis  people,  from  a  site  in  western  New  Mexico  where  some  stone
spearpoints were first discovered in 1932 (and oddly enough a town named
after  the  first  Merovingian  king  of  France).  The  Clovis  spearpoints  are
believed to be representative of a purely “American” style of manufacture,
and can be found throughout the Americas. (Of course, this gives rise to a
question:  If  the  “Clovis”  people  came  from  Siberia,  why  is  there  no
evidence  of  Clovis  points  in  Siberia?)  Given  their  antiquity,  the  theory  is
that the Clovis people were not only the first race to set foot on American
soil,  but  are  the  progenitors  of  all  other  Native  Americans.  Thus,  the
Aztecs,  Incas,  Mayas,  Iroquois,  Cherokee,  Chickasaw,  Hopi,  Quecha,
Narragansett,  Pequot,  Zuni  and  all  other  known  “Indian”  and  American
tribes and civilizations are direct descendants of the Clovis people.

The  opposing  view—and  one  which  goes  in  and  out  of  fashion  regularly
through the years—is that of the “diffusionists.” This theory has it that parts
of North and South America were peopled by races from Asia, Europe and
the Middle East at various times, people who sailed across the Atlantic from


background image

the Mediterranean or from the northern European coastlines of Scandinavia,
France,  Spain,  Portugal  and  the  British  Isles,  across  the  Pacific  from
Southeast  Asia  or  the  Chinese  mainland,  or  from  Polynesia.  The
diffusionists like to believe that some of our modern Native Americans are
descendants  of  Phoenicians,  Celts,  Malays,  Chinese  and  other  ancient
civilizations.

In the late 1940s and early 1950s, a Norwegian adventurer attempted to

prove  that  it  was  possible  to  sail  across  the  Pacific  Ocean  on  a  raft.  Thor
Heyerdahl  wanted  to  show  that  people  from  South  America  could  have
traveled  to  Asia  (or,  at  least,  the  South  Pacific)  a  thousand  years  before
Columbus; and that people from Sumeria and Egypt could have sailed the
Indian  and  Atlantic  oceans  in  ancient  times.  Several  books  (Kon Tiki

 

and

Aku  Aku

 

among  them)  were  written  defending  this  point  of  view  and

showing how Heyerdahl managed to build a raft using local materials and
sail across the seas using only the stars for navigation. His

 

Ra Expedition

proved that one could sail across the Atlantic the same way, always using
materials and methods—including navigational methods—that would have
been locally available at the time and place of origin. (His film of the Kon
Tiki voyage between South America and Polynesia won a 1951 Academy
Award for Best Documentary.) Heyerdahl’s courageous undertaking was all
the rage among laypersons for some years, and then interest waned and we
were back to wrestling with the Clovis theory.

There  are  some  facts,  however,  that  are  disturbing  to  mainstream

archaeologists, who dismiss anomalies as either hoaxes or as inexplicable,
preferring to accept the Clovis position because it’s neat and tidy. There is
also a political problem with diffusionism, because some believe it would
devalue the Native American culture. That this is patently not the case has
been verbalized again and again by some Native American diffusionists, but
their words fall on deaf ears.

6

Question:

 

Examination of an Egyptian mummy of the 21st Dynasty by a

German toxicologist in 1992 shows that the body tested positive for tobacco
and cocaine, products that were native only to the Americas at the time of
the pharaohs. How did tobacco and cocaine reach ancient Egypt?

7


background image

Question:

 

What  are  graphic  depictions  of  maize  doing  on  the  Hindu

temples  at  Karnataka,  when  maize  is  another  of  those  products  that  are
native  to  the  Americas  and  which  supposedly  were  unheard  of  and
unknown in India at the time of the carvings… the twelfth century, A.D.?

8

Question:

 

What about the sweet potato, which was known throughout the

Pacific basin, including Polynesia, as early as 400 A.D. …when the sweet
potato is indigenous to the Americas only? 

9

Most  surprising  of  all,  what  are  stones  doing  in  West  Virginia,  New

Mexico, Minnesota and elsewhere inscribed with ancient scripts that were
unknown to the Native Americans who had no written languages?

Remains of ancient civilizations in the Americas that predate the Clovis

migrations  are  routinely  ignored  or  devalued,  since  they  don’t  fit  the
pattern.  Other  explanations  are  sought  for  the  existence  of  15,000–30,000
year old burial sites in the Andes Mountains, for instance, or petroglyphs in
West  Virginia  that  are  written  in  ancient  European  languages.  Science
assumes that these are either hoaxes, or somehow “anomalies” that cannot
be explained… and which are therefore put in a category of “unknowables”
and left outside the mainstream discussions.

Richard Rudgley in his

 

Lost Civilizations of the Stone Age

 

refers to the

interesting  case  of  the  Seven  Sisters,

10

  a  constellation—the  Pleiades—that

was  known  by  that  name  to  the  ancient  races  of  North  America…

 

and

Siberia…

 

and

 

Australia; if this is more than merely a coincidence, Rudgley

points  out,  then  it  implies  a  common  origin  for  the  name  of  this
constellation  that  must  predate  the  peopling  of  North  America  as  well  as
that  of  Australia.  In  other  words,  it  is  evidence  of  a  single  body  of
knowledge that existed more than 40,000 years ago, common to Asians and
North Americans since that time. “Most researchers tend to ignore findings
as anomalous as these,” Rudgley says, “as they simply do not fit well with
generally accepted views.”

11

The  late  Harvard  Professor  Barry  Fell  did  a  lot  to  try  to  change  that

attitude,  and  made  an  excellent  case  for  the  diffusionist  perspective.  His
research has been roundly (if not soundly) attacked in recent years by the
Clovis faction, much in the way Gerald Posner attacks critics of the Warren


background image

Commission. Using selective evidence out of context and ignoring evidence
that  doesn’t  fit  in  with  basic  assumptions,  it  is  possible  to  attack  virtually
everything  and  sound  knowledgeable  doing  it.  Of  course,  Fell  and  the
diffusionists  have  been  accused  of  the  same  sins.  The  controversy  has
become  emotional  and  personal  at  times.  But  the  weight  of  diffusionist
evidence is growing every year, and the implications of it are startling and
will  eventually  require  a  rewriting  of  American  prehistory  as  we  know  it.
Before we examine diffusionism in detail, though, it is worthwhile to pick
up our story where we left off, with America in the nineteenth century and
an obsession with buried treasure and sacred hills.

Joseph  Smith  called  the  Indian  mound  in  upstate  New  York  where  he

received the golden plates “the Hill Cumorah,” after an incident in his own
Book of Mormon. Others since Smith have tried to place Cumorah in other
regions,  such  as  Central  America  or  Mexico,  even  though  Smith  himself
referred to this gentle slope near Manchester, New York as Cumorah. What
is  not  generally  known  to  most  Mormons  is  that  America  during  Smith’s
lifetime was a hotbed of speculation about the mounds.

Mounds  are  found  all  over  the  United  States,  from  New  England  to

Missouri, with a few in Texas and some in Florida. There are, in fact, over
100,000 of them (and this does not count all the sacred circles and standing
stones,  which  most  Americans  are  totally  unaware  exist  in  their  own
country).

12

Some  of  them  are  burial  mounds,  as  can  be  evidenced  by  the

skeletal  remains  found  therein.  Others  are  sacred  sites  arranged  in  ways
reminiscent  of  Stonehenge  in  England,  mounds  astronomically  oriented
towards the solstices or to the rising of some specific star. Others still are
vast works of art, such as Serpent Mound in Adams County, Ohio, which
has  been  analyzed  by  professionals  and  shown  to  be  more  than  art:  an
artistic astronomical computer, oriented towards the solstices, the moon, the
sun,  and  the  constellations  of  Draco  and  Ursa  Major,

13

consistent  with  a

theology we can only imagine, and like those intricately engraved Persian
astrolabes one sometimes finds in an antique store or a

 

souk. Some of these

Neolithic  sites  are  mere  piles  of  earth;  others  were  constructed  using
wooden  logs  as  a  kind  of  infrastructure.  Others  constitute  what  appear  to
have  been  entire  cities,  with  wide  avenues  and  huge  platform  mounds


background image

enclosing areas in excess of twenty acres or more, such as “Great Hopewell
Road” in Ohio, which links Newark with Chillicothe. 

14

But the real mystery in the early nineteenth century was “who built the

mounds, and why?”

Although  generally  referred  to  as  “Indian  burial  mounds,”  it  was

acknowledged that the Indians themselves had no precise data to offer as to
their origins or purpose. When asked, the Native American elders of some
tribes would refer to an older race or tribe that had lived in the area long
before their own arrival. In some cases, there were stories of a race of the
“Old Ones” or the “First People” who had lived and then disappeared ages
ago.  Some  tribal  groups  occupied  earthworks  and  other  types  of
fortifications that they admit they did not build, but found unoccupied, such
as the Anasazi site in the American Southwest. (The word Anasazi means

“Old  Ones.”)  With  the  passage  of  time  and  a  lot  of  digging,  archaeology
came  up  with  two  distinct  groups  of  prehistoric  Americans  in  the  region
roughly from New England to the Mississippi River basin: the Adena and
the Hopewell cultures.

Although even this division of two distinct groups is currently a matter

for some debate (some archaeologists entertaining the belief that they were
really the same people) it would do us well to consider them separately for
now,  as  most  of  the  literature  one  comes  across  still  speaks  of  two,  very
different,  populations  and  cultures.  The  earliest  of  these  was  the  Adena
people,  named  after  a  farm  in  Ohio  where  this  type  of  mound  was
excavated.  The  Adena  flourished  two  thousand  years  ago  and  longer,  and
were building mounds in America at the time of Christ, even at the time of
Buddha.  No  wonder,  then,  that  Smith  would  have  identified  one  of  these
mounds  as  having  been  built  by  a  tribe  of  Jews  who  had  fled  the  Middle
East  and  wound  up  on  American  shores.  Except  that  the  dating  of  the
mounds took place long after Smith had written the

 

Book of Mormon.

Precise  dating  is  not  always  possible  when  it  comes  to  the  mounds.  In

many  cases,  they  are  simply  earthworks  with  nothing  that  can  be  reliably
carbon-dated. In other cases, though, there are skeletal remains as well as
wood  fragments,  pottery  and  ornaments,  and  these  lend  themselves  rather
more easily to specific dating exercises.


background image

After  the  Adena  came  the  Hopewell  culture,  which  was  more  complex

and  sophisticated  than  the  Adena,  and  which  built  some  of  the  more
elaborate mound complexes and effigy mounds, such as (it is claimed) the
Serpent Mound, which is now dated by some to around 1066 A.D., and by
others to 250 A.D.

No one knows where the Adena came from, or what happened to them. It

is believed that they were either exterminated by the later Hopewell culture,
or  were  assimilated  into  the  Hopewells  through  intermarriage  and  the
gradual  erosion  of  their  own  culture.  Their  only  legacy  rests  in  the
proliferation  of  mounds.  In  some  of  these,  strange  burial  patterns  were
observed, such as the twelve people buried at the Kiefer Mound in Ohio, in
a circle with their heads on the inside of the circle and their feet pointing
outwards “like spokes in a wheel.” 

15

This same arrangement was reported in

the

 

Wheeling Gazette—a  body  on  an  altar,  head  facing  “west  of  north”  in

the direction where there was evidence of a fire, the body covered by a foot
of  ashes.  The  body  was  found  to  be  “remarkably  perfect,  and  was  mostly
preserved. Around this body were twelve others with their heads centering
towards  it,  and  feet  projecting.  No  articles  of  art  were  found,  except  a
polished stone tube, about twelve inches in length.” 

16

The alignment of the

body  implies  an  astronomical  orientation  consistent  with  many  Hopewell
and  Adena  sites.  In  this  case,  it  is  possible  that  the  “west  of  north”
alignment  was  towards  Ursa  Major,  but  that  is  pure  conjecture  since  we
don’t know when the site was constructed or the bodies interred. The fact
that  there  were  twelve  other  bodies  with  the  central,  altar-lain  body
indicates that these twelve were killed, sacrificed, in some sort of ritual. The
stone tube might have been a pipe, or it could have served some function of
which  we  are  not  aware;  such  is  the  state  of  knowledge  of  American
prehistory. Oddly, this is a precise description of a Cathar burial method of
the  thirteenth  century  A.D.  (and  of  nine  persons  discovered  dead  in  an
identical  wheel-like  formation—heads  inside,  feet  out—after  the  FBI
assault on the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas in 1993). At the
Kiefer Mound, three of the twelve corpses had been decapitated, with the
skulls placed between the thigh bones. This odd placement of the skulls also
exists  in  other  Adena  sites  in  Kentucky. 

17

Engraved  tablets  were  found

buried  in  these  mounds  with  the  artistically  arranged  bodies,  and  Adena


background image

experts William S. Webb and Charles E. Snow believe that this “constitutes
a very important Adena trait.” 

18

Then there is the red paint. Ochre coloring was common on the skulls and bones of the deceased; in other words, after the

bodies had decomposed someone had cleaned off the bones and painted them with red paint, sometimes in strange symmetrical
designs, and then reburied them. In some cases, the ochre was piled onto the lower extremities of the corpses 

19

and in two Adena

sites in Kentucky a black graphite compound was used to color the skull and collar bones of the corpse while red ochre was used
for the lower extremities. 

20

No one knows the purpose of this ritual, but the use of ochre in sacramental painting was common all

over Europe in ancient times as well as in early North American civilizations. The amount of work involved in either stripping the
skeletons of flesh and then painting the bones, or in waiting for natural decomposition to occur and then digging up the bodies and
painting them and then reburying them, was prodigious, and must have served an identifiable purpose deemed necessary to the
Adena.

In one case mentioned by Webb and Snow, the skull of a young woman

was painted in horizontal red stripes of ochre on the top of the skull, leaving
the forehead bare of any ochre; the red ochre was continued in horizontal
stripes over the eyes, and then a vertical bar of graphite extended from the
forehead down between the eyes to the nasal cavity. 

21

This clearly had some

religious significance for the Adena, but whatever it was is lost in time.

Other  symbolic  motifs  found  in  Adena  sites  include  a  plumed  serpent,

which  gives  rise  to  speculation  that  the  cult  of  Quetzalcoatl  of  Aztec
Mexico had reached the Adena, or vice versa. A plumed serpent is a very
specific  icon,  a  complex  mix  of  concepts  that  implies  all  sorts  of  cultural
and religious ideas. It strains belief to insist that the plumed serpent of the
Adena had nothing at all to do with the plumed serpent of Mexico, a land
not that far to the south. The presence of obsidian flakes in Adena mounds 

22

adds further credence to the theory that there was a connection between the
Adena and the Aztecs, since the Aztecs prized obsidian. Indeed, one of the
famous shew stones of the Elizabethan magician and spy, John Dee, was of
Aztec  obsidian  brought  back  from  the  New  World  by  Spanish
conquistadores.  The  Aztecs  used  the  obsidian  shew  stone  in  an  identical
fashion to that used by Dee (and, later, Joseph Smith), as a kind of crystal
ball. To the Aztecs, the obsidian mirror was sacred to the god Tezcatlipoca,
the  “god  of  the  smoking  mirror,”  who  would  reveal  to  them  the  will  of
heaven. Tezcatlipoca was identified with the constellation Ursa Major, thus
tying together astronomy with religion and divination in a pattern familiar
to  all  students  of  ancient  civilizations.  The  astronomical  alignments  of
many of the Adena mound sites is further evidence of this persistent occult
theorem. Joseph Smith, of course, used shew stones in much the same way


background image

as  the  Aztecs  and  John  Dee.

23

  Indeed,  John  Dee  himself  was  a  scientific

advisor to English expeditions to the New World, and a close friend of Sir
Walter Raleigh, the man who introduced tobacco and many other curiosities
to  England  from  the  New  World.  Elizabethan  magician  and  spy,  Dee  also
became convinced that a Welsh prince had “discovered” America centuries
before Columbus.

24

Raptorial  birds  were  also  common  symbols  among  the  Adena,

particularly the hawk. Webb and Snow remark upon an actual hawk’s head
that  was  sewn  onto  a  ceremonial  headdress.

25

  There  was  even  a  unique

symbol found at one site: a hand with an eye depicted on its palm, a symbol
familiar to those who study ancient Middle Eastern religions and mysticism.

26

Further,  a  unique  characteristic  of  the  Adena  people  was  their

extraordinary height. Analysis of skeletal remains at Adena sites shows the
men  to  have  occasionally  reached  seven  feet  in  height,  with  the  women
often  over  six  feet  tall.  Thus,  their  physical  dissimilarity  to  the  later
Hopewells  contributes  to  accurate  identification  of  the  mounds,  but  also
raises questions as to their racial origin. Today, this supposed difference in
physical appearance between the two cultures is debated, and studies have
been done to show that the Adena and Hopewell peoples were related, if not
actually the same people. What is lacking is a detailed analysis of some of
the  remains  found  in  these  mounds,  which  show  a  race  that  can  only  be
described as a race of “giants.”

Newspaper  reports  from  the  late  1800s  discuss  skeletons  of  more  than

seven  feet  and  eight  feet  in  length  found  in  burial  mounds  and  caves  that
often  contained  stone  altars,  or  even,  in  at  least  one  case,  a  stone
sarcophagus. Cyrus Thomas reports on the “blond mummies” of Tennessee
and  Kentucky  in  the

 

Twelfth  Annual  Report  of  the  Bureau  of  Ethnology,

dated 1894. These bodies were in “some instances” found “incased in stone
slabs  and  afterwards  imbedded  in  clay  or  ashes.  In  Smith  and  Warren
counties,  Tennessee,  and  in  Warren  and  Fayette  counties,  Kentucky,  the
flesh  of  the  bodies  was  preserved  and  the  hair  was  yellow  and  of  fine
texture…. In one of the caves in Smith county the body of a female is said
to  have  been  found,  having  about  the  waist  a  silver  girdle,  with  marks


background image

resembling  letters.” 

27

This  discovery  of  letters  or  hieroglyphics  in  ancient

American burial sites is not an isolated case.

In December 1870, the so-called Brush Creek Tablet was unearthed from

a burial mound on the farm of one J. M. Baughman in Muskigum County,
Ohio. The tablet contains a variety of carvings which appear to be a form of
hieroglyphic.  Even  more  startling,  the  mound  was  found  to  contain
skeletons  measuring  eight  and  nine  feet  in  length. 

28

Of  course,  these

assertions—including  a  signed  affidavit  by  six  citizens  swearing  that  the
above account is true—are dismissed by academia. Citizens, of course, are
not to be trusted as “reliable observers.”

In 1838, the same year that Joseph Smith “returned” the golden plates of

the Book of Mormon to an angel, a large Adena mound was excavated at
Grave  Creek,  West  Virginia.  In  a  burial  chamber  in  that  mound  which
contained a single skeleton and some copper bracelets (and at a depth of 60
feet) an 

29

en

graved tablet was discovered, carved with Phoenician characters

in  a  style  of  writing  that  was  common  in  Spain

 

two  thousand  years  ago.

This  type  of  writing,  sometimes  called  “Punic,”  was  Semitic  in  origin,
Spain then being controlled by Carthage, which in turn had originated in the
previous millennium as an outpost of the Semitic Phoenicians. At the time
the tablet was discovered, this type of script had not yet been deciphered,
and would not be deciphered until the mid-twentieth century, thus ruling out
the possibility of a hoax even if the discovery of the tablet under sixty feet
of  ancient  burial  mound  was  not  enough  to  assure  its  provenance.  Thus,
there is at least circumstantial evidence that West Virginia had been visited
by  Europeans  at  the  time  of  Christ.  There  is  no  other  way  to  explain  the
presence of that stone tablet in that grave, carved in a writing that would not
be deciphered for another hundred years.

And the Grave Creek tablet is not an isolated case.

There is the Bat Creek stone, for instance. Discovered in a burial mound

in eastern Tennessee in 1889, its carvings were identified as ancient Hebrew
by archaeologist Cyrus Gordon in 1971, a type of Hebrew that dates from
the  first  hundred  years  after  Christ.  The  inscription  is  said  to  read  “For
Judea.”  Shades  of  Joseph  Smith!  The  site  was  later  (1988)  carbon-dated,
and  found  to  date  from  the  period  32—769  A.D.  Thus,  Cyrus  Gordon’s


background image

1971 identification of the type of Hebrew and the 1988 carbon-dating of the
site are consistent. 

30

The American landscape is replete with stone carvings, some very simple

and  others  quite  elaborate,  which  point  to  a  continuing  immigration  of
Europeans  and  Middle  Eastern  peoples  to  its  shores.  A  sub-discipline  of
archaeology—known as epigraphy—has attracted amateur archaeologists in
America  for  many  years.  Epigraphy  is  concerned  with  writings  on  stone,
and epigraphers scour the countryside, the forests, the hills and mountains,
looking  for  stone  inscriptions  and  trying  to  identify  and  decipher  them.
Epigraphy  and  epigraphical  evidence  are  mainstays  of  the  diffusionist
argument,  because  stone  carvings—once  they  have  been  identified  and
certified  as  genuine  and  ruled  out  as  hoaxes—can  represent  unequivocal
proof of foreign visitation to American soil in the years before Columbus
and, in some cases, in the years before Christ. Joseph Smith’s worldview—
though  based  on  a  hoax,  according  to  his  detractors—is  amazingly  in
accord  with  the  worldview  of  the  diffusionists,  which  is  not  unexpected
since there was such a lot of speculation about the Mound Builders at the
time the

 

Book of Mormon

 

was being written. According to scholars such as

Fell,  people  from  the  Middle  East

 

did

 

come  to  America  long  before

Columbus.  And  where  they  did  not  leave  golden  plates  covered  with
lengthy  scriptural  writings  (at  least,  not  as  have  been  discovered  so  far!),
they did leave stone tablets with scriptural quotations.

 
…they  have  somewhat  observed  the  motions  of  the  stars;  among
which it has been surprising to me to find that

 

they have always called

‘Charles Wain’ by the name of “Paukunnawaw,” or “the Bear,” which
is the name whereby Europeans also have distinguished it.

 

Moreover,

they  have  little,  if  any,  traditions  among  them  worthy  of  our  notice;
and reading and writing is altogether unknown to them, though

 

there is

a  rock  or  two  in  the  country  that  has  unaccountable  characters
engraved upon it.

—  Cotton  Mather,

 

Magnalia  Christi  Americana,  1702,  Part  III,  in

which  he  is  writing  of  the  American  Indian  population  (emphasis
added)

One of the earliest Americans interested in the strange carved inscriptions
was our old friend Cotton Mather. He is known to have informed the Royal


background image

Society  in  England  of  the  discovery  of  a  strange  inscription  on  a  stone  in
Dighton,  Massachusetts  by  clergyman  John  Danforth,  who  discovered  the
inscription  in  1680.  The  Royal  Society  published  the  information  in  their
Philosophical Transactions

 

in  1712,  and  thereafter  the  matter  died  on  the

vine. 

31

Item: There is the fact of the Los Lunas stone, found in New Mexico (the

home of the first identified “Clovis” site). This is a stone boulder covered in
a form of Hebrew writing current at the time of the first Temple, circa 1000
B.C.,  but  which

 

was  not  translated  until  1949.  When  it  was  finally

translated,  it  was  revealed  to  be  an  abbreviated  form  of  the  Ten
Commandments. 

32

The  Ten  Commandments.  In  ancient  Hebrew.  In  New  Mexico.  2,500

years before the visit of Columbus.

Do we, as Americans, really understand our own history? Is our history

the  history  of  an  unknown  race  of  people  who  created  a  vast  and  vibrant
civilization  and  then—due  to  disease,  perhaps,  in  the  Great  Dying  of  the
sixteenth century—disappeared, leaving only the mounds as their trace? Is
our history the history of our own ancestors in Europe, Africa, Asia? Is it
simply the history of the land we occupy? Or is it really a combination of
all of these? Is our history that of our ancient ancestors, who evidently came
and  went  from  America  many  times  and  for  many  reasons  over  the  last
three  or  four  thousand  years?  Is  America  a  legacy  of  Asian  Buddhists,
Palestinian  Jews,  Norse  Vikings,  and  Phoenician  traders  as  well  as  a
shipload of Pilgrims from England? Is America’s function as a destination
of  dreams  for  all  the  peoples  of  the  earth  no  more  than  a  memory  of  the
time when it did, indeed, belong to everyone?

Is  the  Statue  of  Liberty  standing  in  New  York  Harbor  an

acknowledgement of America’s ancient purpose?

Even  further,  when  we  teach  American  history  in  school  should  we

begin, as always, with its discovery by Columbus in 1492… or should we
begin instead with the fall of Carthage, or the Buddhist missions, or the cult
of  Wotan?  Or  with  the  Cahokia  Mound  near  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  a  vast
prehistoric complex that stuns the imagination? Or with the Newark mound


background image

complexes  and  their  radical  octagon–circle–square  designs?  By  drawing  a
straight line through history at 1492 we, as Americans, are enforcing a kind
of  dual  personality  upon  ourselves.  At  first,  such  a  strategy  was  useful  in
order  to  amalgamate  all  the  various  nationalities  that  came  to  our  shores
looking for freedom and opportunity. Wiping out our ancestral heritage was
a way of adopting the new, American heritage and making us all the same,
all Americans, regardless of our family names or skin color.

But what have we lost in the process?

Item:  The  famous  Peterborough  Stone,  in  Ontario.  A  huge  rock

measuring  “hundreds  of  square  feet.”  Professor  Barry  Fell  identified  the
maze  of  writings  as  a  form  of  Scandinavian  runes  or,  actually,  pre-runic
characters  that  he  dated  to  1700  B.C.  Later  archaeologists  have  corrected
Fell’s  dating  and  translation,  but  were  left  with  the  result  that  Fell  was
essentially  correct:  the  characters  are  written  in  a  script  called  Tifinagh,
which  was  used  by  the  Tuaregs—a  people  of  northern  Africa.  The  stone
was dated to 800 B.C. rather than 1700 B.C., but represents the record of a
trade route in gold running from the Niger River in Africa to Scandinavia
and then, eventually, to Ontario. 

33

In 800 B.C. At the time of the origin of the Adena people, eight hundred

years before Christ and roughly contemporary with the life of the Buddha.
A trade route from Africa, to Europe, to America. An established path for
other  traders,  other  peoples,  other  races,  civilizations,  religions.  The
Tuaregs and Scandinavians in 800 B.C. were, of course, pagans. How much
of their culture did they bring with them to America? Did they intermarry
with  local  races?  Did  they  teach  their  systems  of  astronomy,  divination,
metallurgy, etc. to the Americans?

Did  the  Americans  teach  the  Tuaregs  and  Scandinavians  anything  in

return?  There  is  no  reason  to  believe  that  the  transmission  of  knowledge
was all one-sided. How did the African and European traders find the gold
mines  in  Canada?  How  long  were  they  in  America?  How  often  did  they
return?

Are their descendants still among us?


background image

Any  one  of  these  pieces  of  evidence—the  Grave  Creek  tablet,  the  Bat

Creek  stone,  the  Peterborough  Stone,  the  existence  of  American  flora  in
ancient  Egypt,  India  and  East  Asia,  and  the  hundreds  of  other  examples,
including  Celtic  Ogam  script  all  over  the  American  northeast—should  be
enough  in  itself  to  force  historians  to  come  to  terms  with  pre-Columbian
civilizations visiting and interacting with tribes, peoples and cultures from
the  Eastern  Hemisphere.  The  preponderance  of  such  evidence,  however,
and  the  multiplication  of  possible  overseas  connections  from  ancient
cultures means that we have to go back carefully over the legends, myths,
and histories of all the ancient peoples and see if we can find textual traces
of this cross-fertilization.
In 1840, a pair of mound enthusiasts decide to excavate a promising group
of  mounds  at  Chillicothe,  Ohio  in  the  very  heart  of  mound  country.  The
team of Squier and Davis are generally acknowledged to be the godfathers
of modern American archaeology. Their exhaustive and systematic work on
hundreds  of  mounds  throughout  the  Midwest  still  stands  as  a  primary
reference for American prehistory studies, and the Chillicothe excavation is
probably  their  defining  moment.  They  were  not  the  first  to  excavate
“Indian”  mounds,  however.  George  Washington  was  interested  in  the
mounds.

34

  No  less  a  personage  than  Thomas  Jefferson  began  a  scientific

stratigraphic excavation of a mound in 1781; his Secretary of the Treasury,
Albert  Gallatin,  was  perhaps  the  most  influential  person  in  American
government (before or since) to have insisted on an appreciation of both the
mounds  and  of  the  Native  American  populations  who  lived  in  the
conquered  territories.  William  Henry  Harrison  (who  would  become  the
United  States’  ninth  president  for  a  month  before  dying  of  pneumonia)
would  follow  suit  in  1838  with  his

 

Discourse  on  the  Aborigines  of  the

Valley of the Ohio, a description of mounds and some fanciful suggestions
as to their origins and purposes. The reader will remember that this year has
shown up before, as the year Joseph Smith returned the golden plates to the
Angel  Moroni,  and  as  the  year  the  “Phoenician”  tablet  was  found  at  the
Grave Creek mound.

(In  an  odd  piece  of  trivia  that  may  interest  some  readers,  a  respected

Hollywood  filmmaker  also  wrote  a  book  about  the  mounds.  Kenneth
MacGowan—producer of such films as

 

Young Mr. Lincoln

 

(1939), and one

of  the  better  propaganda  films  of  the  early  war  years,

 

Man  Hunt

 

(1941),


background image

wrote

 

Early Man In the New World.  MacGowan,  who  began  his  career  in

New York City in the Broadway theater, later became a film theorist as well
as a teacher at UCLA, and authored several textbooks on cinema, for which
he is better known. He died in 1963 at the age of seventy-five.)

Other personalities who became involved in mound research included the

founders  of  the  town  of  Marietta,  Ohio:  Rufus  Putnam  and  Manasseh
Cutler,  the  former  a  general  of  the  Revolutionary  War  and  the  latter  a
minister. Marietta is in the heart of mound country, not far from Chillicothe,
and  General  Putnam  forbade  the  destruction  of  the  mounds  by  farmers,
instead making detailed maps of them for posterity.

But it is to Ephraim George Squier and Dr. Edwin H. Davis that we owe

most  of  our  early  knowledge  about  the  mounds.  Together  they  excavated
more  than  two  hundred  of  them,  and  published  the  results  inAncient
Monuments of the Mississippi Valley: Comprising the Results of Extensive
Original Surveys and Explorations
, a by-now standard text that was the first
(1848) publication of the Smithsonian “Contributions to Knowledge” series.
The  Chillicothe  site  is  amply  described  and  illustrated;  indeed,  there  are
nearly  300  Adena  mound  sites  within  a  150  mile  radius  of  Chillicothe,
extending  into  Indiana,  Kentucky,  West  Virginia  and  Pennsylvania.  These
sites  include  the  Grave  Creek  Mound,  in  Moundsville,  West  Virginia
described above, as well as the mounds in Mound State Park in Indiana.

The Grave Creek site boasts the largest mound of the Adena culture: it

has a 295 foot base diameter, and is 69 feet high; it represents 60,000

 

tons

of earth, and was built around 200 B.C. (It is tempting to note that dividing
the  height  by  the  diameter  of  this  mound  gives  .2338,  which  begs  us  to
consider that it might have had astronomical importance: the ratio seems to
mimic  that  of  the  angle  of  the  ecliptic,  which  is  about  23  degrees  30
minutes.)  It  was  in  the  Grave  Creek  Mound  that  the  stone  bearing
Phoenician inscriptions was discovered in 1838, ten years before Squier and
Davis  published  their  “monumental”  study.  This  gives  rise  to  several
questions,  if  we  accept  that  the  stone  is  authentic  (and  many,  if  not  most,
authorities  insist  it  is  not)  and  that  its  placement  in  the  mound  took  place
during the Adena period (and not much later). It is only with reluctance that
some  archaeologists  today  accept  these  facts,  although  they  have  no


background image

explanation  for  them  and  describe  the  Phoenician  stone  as  “anomalous.”
Conveniently, the stone itself has since disappeared, although copies of its
inscription were made when it was still in the possession of archaeologists.

The first question is the obvious one: In what way were the Adena people

and the Phoenicians related? By trade? Or was there some other dimension
to  the  relationship?  Were  the  foreign  visitors  or  traders  attempting  to
convert the Adena people to their religion? Did they leave the stone behind
as a reminder to the Adena of their visit? Was it simply the work of one of
the  visitors  with  a  lot  of  time  on  his  hands,  something  to  occupy  himself
perhaps? Or was it left there as a kind of claim, a “Kilroy was here” sort of
memento?

The second question is perhaps more oblique: Why was the stone buried

in the mound in the first place?

Is  one  of  the  skeletons  found  in  the  Grave  Creek  Mound  the  mortal

remains  of  one  of  the  visitors?  The  stone  was  found  with  one  specific
skeleton, wearing copper bracelets. Was the stone left there after the fashion
of funerary goods, such as the ancient Egyptians buried with their kings? It
seems safe to assume that the Adena people did not simply “find” the stone;
the stone and the mound are of the same period.

And why that stone, and nothing else to suggest foreign influence?

T

he  first  question  may  be  easiest  to  answer,  although  with  a  result

unacceptable to most modern historians and archaeologists. When the stone
was  finally  deciphered—after  its  identification  as  a  form  of  Punic
(Phoenician) used on the Iberian peninsula during the first millennium B.C.
—the text was found to refer to the 

35

mound specifically: “The mound raised

on high for Tasach…” it says, in part, according to Barry Fell, and appears
to be an astrological text. Thus, the stone and the mound are part of a single
event, the stone left in its spot as a message to future generations. If Tasach
was an Adena person, then why was there an inscription in an Iberian form
of Phoenician? If Tasach was a visitor from Iberia, however, then American
prehistory will have to be re-evaluated, since the Grave Creek Mound (also
referred  to  as  “Mammoth  Mound”)  is  representative  of  the  Adena
moundbuilder  technology  as  a  whole.  The  conclusion  to  which  the
diffusionists leap—and which the independent inventionists refuse to accept


background image

under any circumstances—is that the Adena (or at least

 

some

 

of the people

identified  as  Adena)  were  not  Native  Americans  but  were,  instead,  Celto-
Iberians from what is now Spain and Portugal.

One stone does not a complete theory make, however. In the first place,

there are those who dispute Professor Fell’s translation, some even denying
the writing is writing at all, or that it represents any kind of alphabet. Others
question whether the writing is a form of Punic, although Fell’s arguments
seem sound in this regard and the similarities between the stone inscription
and  forms  of  Punic  seem  almost  too  strong  to  ignore.  Some  philologists
have  rallied—albeit  halfheartedly—to  Fell’s  defense.  If

 

only

 

that  single

stone had been found, we still would have been forced to confront a whole
host  of  issues  historical  and  archaeological.  It  would  still  have  to  be
explained somehow, and the explanation would necessarily be upsetting to
establishment archaeology.

However, many more stones have been found throughout West Virginia

and Kentucky which support the diffusionists’ claim that America was not
simply visited briefly by a few scattered ships from Europe over a period of
time, but was rather settled by foreign races hundreds, if not thousands, of
years before Columbus. The social and political implication of this theory is
that—in some eyes, anyway—it could be seen as devaluing the culture and
contribution of the Native American population.

OGAM’S RAZOR

I

n addition to the strange Phoenician, Hebrew and other stone inscriptions

or  petroglyphs,  epigraphers  have  been  uncovering  hundreds  (if  not
thousands) of stones carved with simple markings that were once thought to
be anything from scratches made by the plows of modern farmers to hoaxes
perpetrated  on  the  gullible.  Epigraphers  have  been  carefully  collecting,
photographing and cataloguing these stones, and in many cases they have
been  able  to  decipher  their  meanings.  One  of  the  pioneers  of  this  type  of
endeavor was Professor Fell himself. Barry Fell was a marine biologist, and
not an archaeologist or historian, which is one of the reasons why his work
has been avoided or attacked by professional archaeologists. However, his
work in epigraphy and ancient languages was a direct result of his work as a
marine biologist. Coming across many examples of petroglyphs on islands


background image

where  he  was  tracing  the  routes  of  voyages  made  by  ancient  peoples
throughout the Old World—in an attempt to discover how plants, animals
and humans were dispersed globally—he realized that these ancient stones
were  probably  important  keys  to  his  research,  and  that  it  would  behoove
him to have them translated or, at least, identified as to their language and
country or race of origin.

It  was  only  when  he  began  receiving  correspondence  from  New  World

archaeologists  about  identical  types  of  carvings  that  he  came  to  the
inescapable conclusion that they were written by people sharing a common
culture  and  language,  and  that  these  same  people  had  traveled  from  the
ancient Old World to the ancient New World thousands of years ago.

Although  still  not  warmly  embraced  by  mainstream  archaeologists,  the

bulk  of  this  evidence  is  overwhelmingly  in  support  of  the  existence  of
ancient Celtic settlements in North America. The stones are carved in an old
form  of  writing  known—to  those  specializing  in  the  Celtic  histories  of
Great  Britain,  Iberia  and  northern  France—as  Ogam,  a  Celtic  word  that
means “grooved writing.”

Ogam is a in simple form that developed before the invention of paper.

Like inscriptions on clay and stone in the ancient Near and Middle East, the
writing style was itself a result of the writing technique: that is to say, due
to the difficulty of writing curving lines and flourishes on solid stone or wet
clay,  the  letters  that  compose  these  alphabets  or  syllabaries  tend  to  be  all
straight lines and sharp edges, the easier to carve with an iron tool or a reed
stylus. Sumerian cuneiform and Germanic runes are examples of this type
of writing. The Ogam script is another.

Consisting  mostly  of  straight,  vertical  strokes  above,  below  or  across  a

horizontal line, Ogam script was identified by an Irish monk writing in the
thirteenth  century  A.D.  Known  as  “The  Ogam  Tract”  in  the

 

Book  of

Ballymote,

 

this  text  had  caused  no  great  interest  at  first,  since  it  was

assumed—incorrectly, as it turned out—that many of the scripts mentioned
were  simple,  childish  codes  and  not  serious  alphabets  at  all.  A  kind  of
Rosetta  Stone  of  ancient  European  scripts,  “The  Ogam  Tract”—in  which
the  nameless  monk  had  tabulated  various  types  of  known  alphabets,
including even Egyptian and Numidian—was the proof, the “smoking gun,”


background image

that  the  diffusionists  were  looking  for,  because  it  was  evidence  that  their
own  identification  of  the  petroglyphs  was  on  target.  One  particular  Ogam
alphabet—known  as  “Ogam  16”—was  of  special  interest,  since  it  seemed
that there were no petroglyphs in existence (in Ireland) engraved with these
characters, which made it quite suspect in the eyes of the archaeologists.

The  fact  that  the  characters  of  Ogam  16  (albeit  unidentified  as  such  at

first)  were  known  to  archaeologists  in  New  England,  West  Virginia,
Kentucky and other states would not be realized until the twentieth century,
when archaeologists in the New World and the Old finally began comparing
notes. Further, the existence of Ogam 16 in North America was particularly
troubling,  since  the  “Ogam  Tract”  was  written  some  eight  hundred  years
ago: three hundred years before Columbus’s first voyage to what he thought
was  India.  Either  our  Irish  monk  was  possessed  of  tremendous  psychic
abilities or, as is most likely, he was privy to knowledge concerning a far
away land and the Ogam script in use there.

The  simplest  solution  to  a  problem  is  usually  the  correct  solution:

“entities are not to be multiplied unnecessarily,” a familiar adage known as
“Occam’s  Razor.”  Named  after  a  Franciscan  theologian  of  the  thirteenth
century,  it  is  frequently  cited  by  scientists  and  logicians.  In  the  case  of
foreign races inhabiting America before Columbus and perhaps before the
peoples  we  know  as  Native  Americans,  the  evidence  in  the  stones,  the
mounds, and the European petroglyphs provides archaeology with a simple
answer, which we may in a spirit of whimsy call “Ogam’s Razor,” since it
cleanly  and  manifestly  demonstrates  that  there  was  wide  exploration  and
settlement  in  America  by  races  from  across  the  Atlantic  Ocean.  That  this
evidence  does  not  seem  to  be  supported  by  the  dispersion  of  Clovis
spearpoints  in  America  does  not  mean  the  evidence  is  invalid;  it  simply
means  that  another  explanation  must  be  found  to  satisfy  both  sets  of
evidence. That archaeology has rushed too quickly to judgment in the case
of  the  early  American  population  scenario  seems  obvious  today.  Are  the
diffusionists  right  and  the  independent  inventionists  wrong?  The  answer
probably lies somewhere between those two positions

The  number  of  ancient  sites  in  America  that  mimic  ancient  sites  in

Europe  is  also  startling.  Circles  of  stones  reminiscent  of  Stonehenge  in


background image

England exist on the North American continent, as astronomically aligned
as their English and Celtic counterparts. Even many of the mound systems
are  now  known  to  have  been  astronomically  oriented,  including  those  at
Marietta  and  Chillicothe.  Some  Adena  sites  show  circles  of  post-holes,
evidence that wooden pillars instead of stone dolmens may have been used
in America for the same purpose: astronomical alignments.

While the idea of astronomically-aligned monuments makes sense when

one  considers  the  reliance  of  the  ancient  peoples  on  agriculture  (it  is
believed the Adena were the first Americans to cultivate maize and live in
communities)  and  therefore  on  knowing  the  seasons,  the  phases  of  the
moon,  etc.,  what  is  startling  about  these  discoveries  is  that  it  means  the
Adena  were  scientifically  sophisticated  enough  to  know  exactly  how  to
build  something  as  complex  as  the  equivalent  of  a  Stonehenge  in  the
American  landscape,  perhaps  as  long  ago  as  two  thousand  years…  or
longer. (The jury is still out on the age of the Adena civilization, and books
and studies published in the last forty years are all over the place regarding
the advent of the Adena civilization.) Dating of Stonehenge itself is rather
uncertain, with estimates ranging from 3000 B.C. to 1500 B.C. Thus, what
is  certain  is  that  some  of  the  prehistoric  mound  sites  in  North  America
actually predate the construction of Stonehenge and may also 

36

pre

date that

of  the  Great  Pyramids  of  Gizeh:  a  proposition  that  would  turn  not  only
American history but world history on its head.

Recent studies undertaken on Adena mounds show that they were mostly

ritualistic  in  nature;  the  difficulty  in  locating  the  remains  of  Adena  living
quarters and villages is directly related to this fact, as the Adena would keep
the mound area clean of debris and non-sacramental artifacts and buildings.
Thus, archaeologists find they are looking further and further away from the
mound systems themselves in order to uncover Adena villages.

It is generally agreed at this point that the burial mounds were created for

special personages or the elite, and were not the usual method of disposing
of the dead, which was probably cremation. As is the case with the Valley
of  the  Kings  in  Egypt,  only  high-ranking  persons  were  accorded  a  full
burial  along  with  funerary  items  such  as  jewelry  (mostly  copper  bracelets
and what are known as “gorgets,” small tablets with engraved markings of


background image

raptors, animals, or geometric designs) and pottery. Yet, in still other cases,
mass burials are sometimes discovered, such as the famous Seip Mound in
Ross  County,  Ohio  which  contained  ninety-nine  skeletons  and  a  huge
number of river pearls… thousands of pearls with a total estimated value in
1970 of $2,000,000. Along with the huge number of skeletons, there was an
inner chamber which served as the final resting place of four adults and two
infants. It is assumed that these were Adena royalty, but, of course, there is
no proof of this or even if the Adena had royalty as we would understand it.

According to early researchers (and now debated), the Adena themselves

were physically quite different from the later Hopewell culture that replaced
them. Adena are referred to as “round heads” and, as mentioned above, they
tended  to  be  quite  tall.  The  remains  of  Hopewell  people  show  that  they
were shorter, and had longer skulls… in fact, the Iberians of ancient Spain,
who  purportedly  gave  us  the  Phoenician  script  discovered  in  the  Grave
Creek mound, were also known as “long skulls” or “long heads.” It should
be  noted  in  addition  that  Iberian  mortuary  practices  included  the  burial
mound: in a design remarkably similar to those of the Adena moundbuilder
culture.  Of  course,  that  is  not  enough  information  to  create  a  scenario  in
which Iberians invaded America and wiped out the Adena culture, replacing
it with their own, or, conversely,

 

were

 

the Adena culture themselves.

If  those  theories  sound  outrageous,  they  are  perhaps  no  more  so  than

some of the other theories put forward in the past two hundred years for the
origins of the mound builders. Some have claimed that they were an errant
band  of  Welshmen,  others  that  they  were  Egyptians  or,  as  Joseph  Smith
believed,  Jews  in  Diaspora.  There  is  certainly  not  enough  data  to  support
any  of  these  theories,  but  the  existing  data  do  not  support  a  simplistic
Clovis  migration  scenario  either.  At  a  conference  held  in  Santa  Fe,  New
Mexico  in  October  1999  on  the  subject  of  “Clovis  and  Beyond,”  such
mainstream  archaeological  types  as  Keith  W.  Kintigh  were  raising  doubts
and  speculating  about  the  Clovis  theory.  Kintigh  is  an  archaeologist  at
Arizona  State  University  in  Tempe  and  president  of  the  Society  for
American Archaeology. His doubts are, like many of his colleagues, based
on the discovery in Monte Verde, Chile in the late 1980s of a race of people
who  lived  in  that  part  of  the  world  about  30,000  years  ago.  The  team  of
archaeologists  was  led  by  Thomas  D.  Dillehay  of  the  University  of


background image

Kentucky,  and  the  people  were  identified  as  a  pre-Clovis  settlement  and
evidence  of  a  pre-Clovis  migration…  at  least  as  far  as  the  southern  tip  of
Chile. If the Clovis people crossed the land bridge from northern Asia and
settled  in  North  America  12,000  years  ago…  then  the  obvious  questions
arise: Who were the Monte Verde people, where did they come from, and
how did they get there so far ahead of the Clovis migration?

As if that were not enough to encourage a re-writing of American history,

there is the problem of the Pima and Zuni sacred languages.

The Pima Indians are descendants of the ancient Hohokam culture of New
Mexico, based around the Sonoran Desert. (The Hohokam themselves were
of  Mexican  origin,  and  migrated  to  New  Mexico  about  300  B.C.)  At  the
beginning  of  the  last  century,  an  ethnologist  with  the  US  Government
visited  the  Pima  and  stayed  with  them  for  about  two  years.  During  that
time,  he  prevailed  upon  the  tribe’s  elders  to  allow  him  to  transcribe  their
sacred Creation Chant. He made a phonetic transcription and, using what he
knew  of  Pima  vocabulary,  attempted  to  translate  it.  This  translation  was
published  by  the  government  in  1908.  The  translation  was  woefully
primitive, as the ethnologist—Frank Russell—himself admitted, making the
dignified  Creation  Chant  virtually  unintelligible  at  best,  or  sounding  like
pidgin  English  at  worst.  And  there  it  languished  for  almost  seventy  years
until  Barry  Fell—using  a  Semitic  dictionary—discovered  that  the  archaic
language in which the chant is sung is a form of Punic.

In his

 

America B.C.,

 

Professor Fell gives the original phonetic rendering

as preserved by Frank Russell, with a corresponding Arabic transliteration,
and  then  an  English  version  beneath  the  Arabic.

37

  The  conclusion  is

inescapable: the Pima Indians had been using an ancient Semitic language
as the repository of their sacred myths. The similarity of the Pima words to
Arabic  is  uncanny,  and  it  renders  the  Creation  Chant  suddenly  quite
intelligible; further, it follows the general description of the chant as given
by one of the Pima elders. What is even more incredible is the realization
that the Pima (like their Hohokam ancestors) reside in the southwestern part
of the continent, about as far from Iberia or Phoenicia as one could get.

Professor  Fell  follows  this  startling  demonstration  with  a  longer

exposition  on  the  Zuni  language.  Without  going  into  all  the  detail  here,


background image

Fell’s  thesis  is  that  the  Zuni  language  is  a  derivative  of  an  ancient  North
African  dialect  spoken  by  Libyan  seamen  around  500  B.C.,  a  language
which  itself  is  descended  from  Egyptian,  with  Anatolian  and  Greek  loan
words. He goes so far as to link these seafaring Libyans and their language
with Malay and Polynesian tongues. He offers as proof not only the spoken
Zuni words and their equivalents in North African dialects, but the written
language as well: discovered carved into stones in New Mexico. Fell does
not  offer  these  examples  unsupported;  he  had  his  work  checked  by
specialists,  such  as  Boulas  Ayad,  Professor  of  Ancient  Languages  at  the
University  of  Colorado,  who  concurred  with  Fell’s  findings.  He  further
offers charts that show the similarity (and, in many cases, identity) of the
written  Libyan  alphabet  as  it  was  known  over  two  thousand  years  ago  to
examples from Asian sources and rock carvings found in Iowa. These same
symbols are found everywhere in the Pacific Rim from Polynesia to Chile,
but also as far away as Quebec and New England.

In  fact,  during  a  dig  at  a  Hopewell  mound  in  Davenport,  Iowa,  some

funerary  offerings  were  found  carved  in  the  shape  of  an  elephant…
certainly not an animal with which the Native Americans would have been
familiar!  Fell  believed  that  many  of  the  more  famous  mounds  of  North
America  were  built  by  these  Libyan  visitors,  including  the  Seip  Mound
mentioned  above.  Some  carved  stone  heads  found  there  bear  a  striking
similarity  to  the  physical  appearance  and  headgear  of  the  ancient  North
Africans.  Take  these  together  with  some  of  the  epigraphic  inscriptions
discussed above, and one can easily see that the simplest explanation is that
people  from  North  Africa  visited  America—and  possibly  settled  here,
building  temples  and  erecting  stone  tablets  to  commemorate  their  race—
thousands of years before Columbus.

It should be emphasized that linguistic evidence is always the hardest to

prove;  armchair  linguists  are  the  bane  of  serious  archaeological  and
historical research. This is even more problematic in the case of the ancient
American  races,  as  they  left  no  written  language  of  their  own.  Unlike  the
tombs at the Valley of the Kings in Egypt, or the Sumerian cylinder seals of
Mesopotamia, or even the recently-decoded Mayan hieroglyphs of Central
America, there appear to be no hieroglyphics or cuneiform or other writing
left  behind  by  the  ancient  North  American  peoples.  No  great  statues  with


background image

carved  braggadocio,  no  dreary  accountant’s  tables  of  figures,  no  secret
spells in magical alphabets. Nothing. All that we have of a written record
are  the  controversial  petroglyphs  studied  so  intently  by  Fell  and  the
diffusionists,  and  if  they  were  left  by  visitors  to  the  American  shores  and
not the native people themselves, then archaeology is at a loss to explain the
function of the vast mound complexes in America.

The  science  of  linguistics  has  its  own  rules  and  accepted  forms  of

demonstration and proof. Fell was aware of this, and wherever possible he
enlisted the support of specialists in this field. As time progressed, however,
Fell  became  one  of  the  few  American  experts  in  Ogam  as  well  as  the
alphabets  of  the  ancient  Near  and  Middle  East,  and  he  was  called  upon
frequently  to  translate  stone  inscriptions  found  all  over  North  and  South
America  by  puzzled  or  bemused  archaeologists  as  well  as  by  amateur
researchers and epigraphers.

The reaction of established historians, archaeologists and anthropologists

to  Fell’s  work  has  been  mixed.  Many  disagree  wholeheartedly  with  the
whole diffusionist perspective, characterizing it as either racist, fascist, the
domain of the credulous and gullible such as the Atlantis-seekers, or simply
as  “rubbish.”  Yet  the  sheer  amount  of  evidence  for  the  habitation  of
America by races from across the Atlantic is virtually overwhelming. If this
evidence  does  not  speak  to  the  diffusionist  theory,  then—going  back  to
Occam’s Razor—what does it represent?

THE SWORD AND THE STONES

P

robably  the  strangest  story  to  emerge  from  diffusionist  literature—and

one even some diffusionists have trouble swallowing—is that of the visit of
a  famous  European  monarch  to  American  shores  (and  from  there  to
Kentucky and Tennessee) and of his subsequent settlement there, giving rise
to  tales  of  “white  Indians”  who  spoke…  Welsh.  This  has  started  its  own
firestorm  of  controversy  as  competing  historians  and  archaeologists  (and
epigraphers) struggle to get the dates and the personalities right.

According  to  popular  amateur  archaeologists  such  as  the  team  of  Alan

Wilson and Baram Blackett—Artorius Rex Discovered,

 

The Holy Kingdom

(with Adrian Gilbert)—King Arthur visited America on or about 652 A.D.


background image

at  the  time  a  meteor  struck  the  British  Isles.  This  meteor  strike,  they
believe,  is  the  reason  for  the  devastation  of  the  land  of  Camelot  in  the
Arthurian legends, and the reason Arthur left Wales for the relative safety of
Normandy.  During  that  same  time,  according  to  the  theory,  one  Prince
Madoc of the Welsh court was at sea and found himself washed off course,
finding  his  way  to  America  by  accident.  Ten  years  later,  he  would  return
and tell Arthur of all the wonderful things he had seen in the land beyond
the sea.

So far, so good.

Then—according to the theory of Wilson and Blackett—Arthur decided

to send a convoy of ships in force to America. They landed, and made it as
far  inland  as  present  day  Kentucky  and  Tennessee.  Arthur  was  killed  in
America  by  one  of  the  natives,  his  body  mummified  and  brought  back  to
Wales, but not before leaving behind a race of white men who would stay to
settle the land.

A competing theory has it that the aforementioned Prince was in reality

Prince Madoc, son of Owain Gwynnedd, a king of the Welsh province of
Gwynnedd  who  lived  in  the  twelfth  century  A.D.,  and  thus  about  five
hundred years later than the legendary Arthur. Owain attempted to unite the
warring Welsh kingdoms into a single nation with a single king—much like
the Arthur of legend—but after his death a civil war broke out between his
many sons about who would succeed him to the throne. Prince Madoc fled
the war, and wound up in America.

Although Madoc’s story does not appear in printed form until 1584, one

Richard  Hakluyt—in  his  Principall  Navigations  of  1600—claims  that  the
story  of  Madoc  and  his  flight  to  America  was  common  knowledge  long
before Columbus’ famous voyage in 1492. Famous Welsh historian Gutyn
Owen also wrote of Madoc before 1492.

According to the best estimates of historian and archaeologist, it would

appear that Madoc landed somewhere at or near Mobile Bay, Alabama and
wandered  inland  from  there.  This  is  based  on  computation  of  probable
landfall due to ocean currents and prevailing winds from the British Isles,


background image

but  also  on  some  strange  anomalies  of  the  landscape  of  that  part  of  the
southeastern United States.

Along the Alabama River, south of Chattanooga, can be seen three large

forts  whose  construction  pre-dates  Columbus  and  is  “unlike  any  known
Indian structure.” According to the Cherokee Indians who were questioned
about the forts, they had been built by a race of white men who lived in the
area before them. One of these forts was found to resemble the birthplace of
Prince  Madoc,  Dolwyddelan  Castle,  in  virtually  every  detail.  Located  on
Lookout  Mountain  in  Alabama,  its  “setting,  layout,  and  method  of
construction”  is  that  of  the  Welsh  prototype.  Indeed,  early  European
explorers to the region spoke of finding these “white Indians”—known as
Mandans—and  the  strange  language  they  spoke,  which  contained  many
Welsh words.

According  to  a  Cherokee  informant  in  1782,  Chief  Oconostota  of  the

Cherokee Nation, the Welshmen who built these forts had been at war with
the  Cherokee  for  many  years  and  finally  signed  a  truce  in  which  they
promised to vacate Cherokee land and head north, up the Ohio River and
then as far as the Missouri. During this diaspora—or perhaps even before
the  truce—they  had  already  begun  losing  their  European  culture  and  had
become  nearly  indistinguishable  from  the  Indians  themselves,  with  some
notable  differences:  their  beards,  grey  hair,  blue  eyes,  and  the  physical
appearance  of  some  of  the  women,  which  resembled  European  women
more than native Americans.

The  Mandans  became  a  canvas  onto  which  many  historians,

anthropologists and archaeologists would paint the pictures they wanted to
see. Hjalmar Holand, in 1940, would see in the Mandans evidence of Norse
explorations  in  North  America,  and  the  Mandans  as  descendants  of  Leif
Erickson  of  Viking  fame; 

38

the  famous—and  controversial—Kensington

Stone is considered evidence of Norse presence in North America hundreds
of years before Columbus. This stone—discovered by a Minnesota farmer
in  1898—is  carved  in  runic  characters  and  is  testament  to  an  attack  on  a
Norse encampment by Indians in the year 1362. It has been attacked as a
forgery over the years, but

 usually on flimsy ground (resulting, for instance,

from ignorance of the type of runic used in Sweden and Norway in 1362);


background image

what  one  cannot  adequately  explain  is  why  someone  would  go  to  all  the
effort of carving hundreds of runic characters into a boulder which is then
left in the ground for so many years that a tree grew roots around it (as it
was found) if the intention was a hoax or a fraud.

In the past few years, however, more evidence has been amassed to prove

that  the  Kensington  Stone—whatever  it  may  be—is  not  a  nineteenth
century  forgery.  Many  of  the  linguistic  references  used  by  its  detractors
were found to be inaccurate or dated; the carvings on the stone itself were
carbon-dated  to  the  right  period  by  examining  changes  in  the  mica
formation along their ridges; finally, Dr. Richard Nielsen—in the spring of
2001—published his findings on the stone in

 

Scandinavian Studies, a peer-

reviewed  linguistic  journal,  in  the  form  of  a  75-page  study  representing
more than ten years of research. The result: Hjalmar Holand was right. The
Kensington Stone is genuine. The experts were wrong. History needs to be
rewritten. There were Norsemen in Minnesota in 1362. Columbus did not
discover America; he was only one of many to recognize a good thing when
he saw it.

Yet, in other areas Holand may have jumped the gun. He dismisses the

theory  that  the  Mandans  are  descended  from  Welshmen;  he  sees  the
Kensington  Stone  as  ample  evidence  of  Norse  immigration  to  Minnesota
and  the  Dakotas,  as  if  it  would  be  therefore  impossible  to  also  imagine  a
group  of  Welshmen  in  the  same  territory.  If  the  Norsemen  arrived  in  that
part of North America sometime in the thirteenth-fourteenth centuries A.D.,
then  it  would  have  been  over  a  hundred  years  after  the  arrival  of  the
mysterious Prince Madoc and his settlers anyway. Holand imagines that the
physical  appearance  of  the  Mandans  is  more  clearly  Nordic  than  Welsh,
based  on  nothing  more  than  eye  color  (claiming  that  Nordic  people  have
blue eyes but that Welshmen have brown eyes, thus ruling out Welshmen as
the progenitors of the Mandan race!) but perhaps he is only succumbing to
the racial theories of his time; he published his work in 1940, a year before
America’s  entry  into  the  Second  World  War,  when  it  was  still  possible  to
write,

The  Swedes  and  Norwegians  are  of  the  purest  Nordic  stock  and  a

relatively smaller number would therefore have been sufficient to transmit


background image

the  physical  peculiarities  for  which  the  Mandans  were  noted  than  if  any
other nationality had been represented by these early culture bearers. 

39

In  the  years  immediately  after  the  American  Civil  War,  a  British  naval
officer  began  a  tour  of  pre-Columbian  architecture  in  the  Americas.
Lindesey  Brine  wanted  to  see  for  himself  the  burial  mounds,  Aztec  and
Mayan  pyramids,  and  the  ancient  fortifications  of  North  and  Central
America. His report—published as

 

The Ancient Earthworks and Temples of

the  American  Indians—is  a  valuable  resource  in  that  it  discusses  the
mounds (and the Native American tribes) rather dispassionately. Brine had
no particular axe to grind: he wasn’t an American, Native or otherwise, and
he  simply  reports  on  the  various  mounds  and  other  structures  as  an
interested  observer,  albeit  one  with  military  experience  and  training.  He
noticed  striking  similarities  between  Central  American  mounds  and  those
of, for instance, Cahokia, forcing him to consider that they were built by the
same people. 

40

This idea that the Native American populations originated in

Mexico  and  Central  America  and  came  north  is  one  that  is  batted  about
constantly  by  one  group  of  archaeologists  or  another.  There  are  some
obvious similarities between religious art and mythology as well, enough to
suggest  a  close  relationship  between  the  two  groups  if  not  actual  direct
lineage.

Brine  goes  further,  to  report  on  Mexican  myths  concerning  a  visit  by

twenty  white,  bearded  men  who  arrived  by  ship  in  the  years  before
Columbus…  men  wearing  sandals,  preaching  what  appears  to  be
Christianity, and dressed in white robes adorned with red crosses. 

41

One is

startled at the similarity of this costume to that of the Knights Templar, men
whose  organization  was  suppressed  by  Pope  and  King  in  the  fourteenth
century and who had found refuge in Portugal, Scotland and other European
lands  even  as  their  brothers  were  being  executed  in  France,  accused  of
heresy and worse.

Brine was also aware of the Mandan tribe, however, and reports on them

at length, in the context of foreign races occupying North America before
Columbus.

42

He begins by discussing a Shawnee tradition that the mounds constructed

in Ohio and Kentucky were built by a race of white foreigners, who were


background image

then  exterminated  in  the  course  of  wars  with  the  Native  American
populations. It should be remembered that the Cherokee themselves have a
similar tradition.

Brine  then  goes  on  to  discuss  an  American  cavalry  officer,  one  Stuart,

who came across the Mandans themselves sometime in the mid-1700s and
was  made  their  prisoner.  Stuart  claims  the  Mandans  told  him  they  were
descended  from  a  race  of  Europeans  who  had  arrived  in  Florida  and  then
made their way north to rest on the western side of the Mississippi once the
Spaniards had landed. Stuart further claimed that another Mandan prisoner,
this  time  of  Welsh  background,  could  make  himself  understood  to  the
Mandans  in  his  native  tongue,  thus  opening  up  the  great  Mandan/  Welsh
controversy.

Brine does not take a firm position on this matter one way or another. He

does not agree that the construction of all of the mounds required European
engineers;  he  does,  however,  believe  that  the  construction  of  the  more
symmetrically-aligned  mounds  would  have  required  a  knowledge  of
geometry  and  engineering  which,  in  his  opinion,  the  existing  Native
American population did not have (although, of course, their ancestors may
have  had  this  information  and  lost  it  along  the  way,  possibly  due  to  an
epidemic  in  North  America  referred  to  by  archaeologists  as  the  “Great
Dying”). He points to the famous mound enclosures at Newark, Ohio as an
example of this.

43

At  Newark,  we  have  a  construction  of  tremendous  size.  The  first  is  a

circle,  twenty  acres  in  area.  Brine’s  conclusion  is  that  it  would  have  been
tremendously  difficult  to  create  a  perfect  circle  of  that  size  without
instruments, but allows that it would still be within the realm of possibility.

What  he  dismisses  as  impossible  without  instruments  is  the  attached

construction of a perfect octagon, containing an area no less than forty acres
in size. These two constructions are joined by a path between them, again
perfectly centered. These “fortifications” (if that is what they are) are of an
advanced  state  of  design  and  engineering.  Brine  feels  that—without
surveying  equipment—the  local  Native  American  population  (or  any
population) would have been unable to construct something of this nature.
If  we  further  examine  those  mound  groupings  that  have  astronomical


background image

orientation—usually to the equinoctial or solstitial points, much the same as
Stonehenge in England—then we are forced to consider whether a race of
beings (either Native American or foreign) having the scientific knowledge
to  create  such  impressive  constructions  could  have  arisen  in  North
America…  and  then  disappeared  without  any  further  trace  than  their
monuments, and their dead. This is possible if we consider that, without a
written  language,  there  was  no  way  to  pass  on  the  techniques  of  mound
building once the Great Dying had begun.

The Mandans were eventually forced even further north, due to warfare

with  the  Sioux,  winding  up  as  far  as  the  Dakotas.  The  last  great  Mandan
settlement—a  town  with  old,  European  style  huts  and  streets,  and  a  fort
with a moat—was located near Minot, North Dakota where it was visited by
French explorer Captain Pierre la Verendrye in 1738. He noticed blond hair
and blue eyes among the Mandans, but with evidence that the Mandan were
the result of a process of intermarriage between the “original” white people
—either  Welsh,  or  Nordic,  or  perhaps  some  other,  European,  race—and
local Native American populations. Yet, their mode of living was in marked
contrast  to  the  local  cultures  and  involved  a  high  state  of  agriculture  and
some  curious  religious  beliefs  which  seemed  to  be  a  mixture  of  Native
American mythology with elements of Christianity, including a story of the
virgin  birth  of  a  great  man;  a  flood,  ark  and  dove;  etc.  They  eventually
succumbed  to  several  smallpox  epidemics,  the  first  in  1837  and  later  in
1856,  and  were  effectively  wiped  out  as  a  tribe.  1838,  of  course,  was  the
year  of  the  discovery  of  the  Grave  Creek  tablet,  the  year  of  the  return  of
Joseph  Smith’s  golden  tablets,  and  the  year  of  the  publication  of  William
Henry Harrison’s fanciful study of the burial mounds. Perhaps the Mandan
tribe held some important information about the pre-Columbian centuries of
North  America—as  well  as  nuggets  of  data  about  the  Norsemen,  or  early
Wales, Prince Madoc, and maybe even the identity (and whereabouts?) of
the putative King Arthur—but that information died with them.

What most Americans know of their Native populations is usually limited
to  genre  literature  and  genre  cinema.  Cowboy-and-Indian  movies  were  a
staple in America since the earliest days of both Hollywood and television.
Americans romanticized the role of the white settler and white soldier and
even, to a large extent, romanticized the “noble savage” as well. They have


background image

seen their own history through a thick scrim of fantasy, fear, and even guilt,
but  still  have  not  embraced  the  pure  reality.  Those  that  live  near
reservations have their own clearly defined set of racial biases. Academics
take a more objective view than most—such is their vocation, after all—but
even  then  their  view  of  Native  American  history  and  culture  is  largely
determined by a few axiomatic theories that are only now being tested by
the weight of archaeological, anthropological and linguistic evidence. The
Native  Americans  themselves  are  confused  by  some  of  this.  Do  they
embrace  the  Clovis  cult,  and  imagine  that  they  all  came  from  a  single
source, a single race that walked across the Bering land bridge thousands of
years  ago  and  dispersed  throughout  the  Americas?  Or  do  some  tribes—
holding ancient traditions that talk of white men or other foreigners landing
in  America  and  settling  there  long  before  Columbus—hold  a  secret  belief
that their origins are more recent than Clovis… or more ancient? Is it really
a devaluation of the Native American population to insist that some of their
ancestors  arrived  here  from  Carthage,  or  Iberia,  or  China,  or  Malaya,  or
even Wales or Ireland? There are those who insist that speculation about the
mounds  having  been  built  by  Europeans,  for  instance,  implies  a  kind  of
racism:  as  if  the  Native  Americans—“savages,”  after  all—were  incapable
of building these complexes themselves. But that is not the point.

If  the  Native  Americans  are

 

descendants

 

of  ancient  European,  Middle

Eastern and South Asian races, then how are they devalued? It is accepted
as  gospel  by  nearly  all  archaeologists  on  both  sides  of  the
diffusionist/independent  inventionist  fence  that  the  Native  Americans  did
not originate in the Americas but arrived there from other places. How does
saying  they  walked  across  the  Bering  Strait  12,000  years  ago  make  them
more  unique  or  important  as  a  race  than  saying  some  of  them  arrived  by
boat from Africa, Europe, or Southeast Asia?

The  stories  of  the  Mandan  tribe  certainly  point  to  an  interbreeding  of

native populations with “white” foreigners. The Native American traditions
are  replete  with  stories  of  ancient  contact  with  European-type  cultures,
traditions  from  Central  America  and  Mexico  north  to  the  Mandans
themselves. By ignoring these venerable traditions and characterizing them
as  superstitious  nonsense,  do  we  not  do  a  much  greater  disservice  to  the
Native Americans, a greater “devaluation”?


background image

There are sites on earth that are sacred to various religions and cults, as

we in the West have been discovering and usually to our dismay. Jerusalem
is sacred to Christians, Jews and Muslims alike. We know this, because we
are all still fighting over it, and the question of Jerusalem and “sacred land”
in general has led to devastating terrorist attacks by Muslims on Jewish and
Christian  targets  worldwide,  in  the  somewhat  dubious  context  of

 

jihad,  a

word  often  translated  as  “holy  war.”  It  has  also  led  to  the  insufferable
conditions  experienced  by  displaced  Palestinians,  and  their  often  obscene
treatment by European conquerors. In Jerusalem, there are sites more sacred
still, and the Dome of the Rock—a Muslim mosque built over part of King
Solomon’s  Temple—is  perhaps  the  ultimate  target  of  religious  fervor
among  Jews  and  Muslims  alike,  not  to  mention  those  Christians  who
believe  that  the  Knights  Templar  discovered  something  important  in  the
ruins  of  that  temple,  or  that  the  Ark  of  the  Covenant  may  still  be  buried
there.  It  is  a  piece  of  land,  nothing  more,  but  it  is  invested  with  so  much
importance  that  tens  of  thousands  have  been  willing  to  die  because  of  it
over the years. Tens of thousands? Perhaps millions.

There  are  mountains  in  Asia  that  are  sacred  to  Buddhists,  others  to

Hindus,  still  others  to  Daoists  and  yet  still  others  to  various  animists  and
pantheists. There are sacred streams, sacred hills, sacred stones all over the
earth.  These  sites  are  invested  with  supernatural  power;  and  when  the
Europeans came to America there were already in place sites sacred to the
Native Americans, to the Aztecs, the Incas, the Mayas… and to older races
for  which  we  have  no  genuine  nomenclature,  such  as  the  Anasazi,  the
Adena, the Hopewell.

The  early  Christians  used  to  meet  in  catacombs,  where  the  dead  were

buried. Some Tantric cults held initiations and other rituals in graveyards in
India. In April 1991 American archaeologists discovered catacombs at Casa
Malpais, Arizona: tombs used for sacred rituals by Native Americans 800
years  ago.  The  workbooks  of  the  medieval  sorcerers—such  as  those
consulted by Joseph Smith—stipulate still other locations as more suitable
than most for raising spirits, evoking demons, talking to God. The Chinese
art of

 

feng shui, so popular these days in Asia and the West alike, is a means

of orienting buildings (and the furniture and decorations within buildings)


background image

so  as  to  direct  the  earth’s  energy  more  profitably.  The  ancient  Hindu
practice of Vaastu is virtually identical in intent.

As  Christianity  became  more  sophisticated,  it  began  the  practice  of

building churches over sites that had been sacred to its pagan predecessors.
Chartres  Cathedral  in  France  is  one  of  these  sites.  The  Church  also
practiced the ritual of siting the altar over the tomb or grave of a dead saint;
failing that, they would have the bones or other relics of a saint embedded
in a special stone that would be placed beneath the altar. The bones of the
sacred dead were essential as a foundation for the ritual of the Mass. The
Eastern  Orthodox  Christians  invented  the

 

antimensia.  This  is  a  cloth  into

which sacred relics have been sewn. It is unfolded at the beginning of the
liturgical service and lain upon the altar as a base for the ritual. For some
reason,  the  Church  understands  the  importance  of  these  relics  and  has
stipulated their absolute necessity for the performance of the core ritual of
the  faith:  the  Divine  Liturgy,  or  Mass,  in  which  the  miracle  of
transubstantiation takes place, the transformation of bread and wine into the
body and blood of Jesus.

If we follow this line of reasoning for a while—and it is a staple of the

belief system of hundreds of millions of Catholics and Orthodox believers
—we  can  posit  a  further  instance  in  which  some  sites  on  earth  are  the
opposite  of  these  sacred  sites,  and  some  relics  the  opposite  of  these  holy
relics.  We  can  even  imagine  that  it  would  be  a  sacrilege  of  no  mean
dimension  to  abuse  the  sanctity  of  the  sacred  site:  for  instance,  to  build  a
prison or a brothel over the grave of St. Peter the Apostle. And if the relics
of  the  saints  are  necessary  in  order  to  form  a  supernatural  link  between
present-day worshippers and the great chain of transformation that can be
traced  directly  back  to  Christ,  then  what  of  relics  of  murderers,  violent
criminals,  satanists,  rapists?  Does  a  lock  of  Adolf  Hitler’s  hair  hold  the
same supernatural force as a lock of the hair of St. Anthony, different only
in kind and not in power?

What if a prison were built over a site sacred to the Hindus, for instance?

What if thousands of criminals were housed in stone and steel cages over
the  very  place  where  once  the  Buddha  slept,  or  the  Goddess  Athena
worshipped, or where the Virgin of Fatima appeared? And if there is great


background image

spiritual solace to be had in close proximity to the remains of a saint, what
contagion should be feared from the blood and bones of Heinrich Himmler,
Josef Stalin… Ted Bundy?

Americans  seem  to  be  unconsciously  aware  that  the  mounds  are

repositories of something more than piles of crumbling bones. The famous
Outlook Hotel in Stephen King’s novel of horror and demonic possession,
The Shining,

 

was said to have been built over an Indian burial mound. The

house  that  was  the  scene  of  terrifying  paranormal  phenomena  in  the  film
Poltergeist

 

was also said to have been built on sacred Indian ground. Thus,

our  novelists  and  filmmakers  seem  to  agree  that  there  is  a  substrata  of
spiritual  force—for  good  or  evil—beneath  the  very  foundations  of
America’s towns and cities.

And those that believe in sacred spaces—Native Americans, Europeans,

Africans,  or  any  of  the  other  races  that  make  up  the  American  mosaic—
what do they think of the mounds, the standing stones, the carved rocks, the
buried  tablets,  and  all  the  other  evidence  of  a  culture,  and  a  religion,  that
existed in America for thousands of years? What gods were worshipped in
Kentucky?  In  West  Virginia?  Ohio?  Indiana?  New  Hampshire?  Rhode
Island? Alabama? Georgia? in the thousand years before the arrival of the
Spanish Catholics and the English Puritans? As America has systematically
engaged  in  a  program  of  eradication  of  its  aboriginal  population,  it  has
simultaneously  wiped  out  knowledge  of  its  own  origins.  We  are  left  with
rocks, bones, a few scraps of ancient language and a few scraps of ancient
myth and tradition, and we attempt to build a coherent story of the history
of  the  continents  based  on  these  poor  remains.  If  there  are  such  things  as
ghosts in this new age, this new reality, then who haunts the mounds? What
language do they speak? What gods do they believe in? And what do they
want from us?

In 1909, the State of West Virginia acquired the Grave Creek mound, and

began its maintenance and refurbishment… with the assistance of prisoners
from the State Penitentiary at Moundsville, which is across the street from
the mound. It is one of a number of prisons located at or near Adena mound
sites, including the federal prison at Chillicothe which has housed Charles
Manson and Henry Lee Lucas.


background image

In 1950, the Garrison Dam was being planned for the Missouri River in

North  Dakota.  The  existing  Native  American  populations  were  pressured
into  signing  yet  another  treaty,  this  time  ceding  their  ancient  lands  to  the
government. George Gillette, the leader of the Hidatsa tribe, broke into tears
as  the  lands  of  his  people  for  over  a  thousand  years  were  signed  away
forever.

44

 

Hidatsa—and what was left of Mandan—sites were submerged in

the  flood,  as  if  in  fulfillment  of  an  ancient  prophecy  about  the  end  of  the
world.

Although  the  story  of  Prince  Madoc/King  Arthur  as  it  pertains  to  the

North American continent is not accepted by all historians, there are enough
who find that both the physical evidence and the written record support the
legend  of  the  voyage  as  recorded  in  Welsh  literature  and  the  lore  of  the
Cherokee nation. While some would object that the Welsh would be eager
to  prove  that  one  of  their  famous  ancestors  had  “discovered”  America
before  Columbus,  it  is  assumed  that  the  Cherokee  would  have  no  such
motive.  In  any  event,  the  schizoid  attitude  of  American  archaeology
towards  theories  of  multiple  migrations  covering  thousands  of  years  and
from several different points of origin is enough to confound and obscure
any attempt at a multidisciplinary approach to the problem, which is what it
requires.  An  objective  team  of  specialists  in  such  fields  as  archaeology,
anthropology,  archaeoastronomy,  epigraphy,  linguistics,  genetics,  and
comparative  religion  (to  name  only  a  few)  is  needed  before  any  kind  of
consensus on this very political question can be reached. Until then, we are
forced  to  sit  back  and  watch  the  experts  duel  with  each  other  over  their
respective  turfs,  while  the  mounds,  the  tablets,  the  stone  inscriptions,  and
the native speakers of ancient languages are ignored and consigned to the
literal dustbins of history.

The  existence  of  the  Alabama  River  forts,  their  similarity  to  Welsh

construction of the period, the existence of the Mandans and their possibly
Welsh vocabulary (a datum that Holand excludes from his study), and the
stories  of  the  Cherokee  elders—and  the  violent  opposition  of  mainstream
archaeologists and historians who dismiss such traditions out of hand as so
much  fanciful  smoke—all  contribute  to  this  bizarre  chapter  in  American
historiography.  For  example,  the  Daughters  of  the  American  Revolution
would  erect,  in  1953,  a  memorial  to  Prince  Madoc  and  his  expedition  of


background image

1170 A.D. at Mobile Bay, Alabama. …and then, a few years later, take it
down again.

Yet,  when  the  author  visited  Charles  Manson’s  hometown,  the  city  of

Ashland, Kentucky in 1990—nearly a decade before the controversial claim
of Wilson and Blackett that King Arthur had visited America—he noted at
the  time  the  existence  of  a  “Camelot”  supper  club  and  lounge  on
Winchester  Avenue…  and  had  the  stunning  realization  that  a  string  of
Indian burial mounds occupied the center of town.

 

1

 

Cotton Mather,

 

The Wonders of the Invisible World,  Boston,  1693,  “Enchantments  Encounter’d,”

section V

2

 

Alexis de Tocqueville,

 

Democracy in America, Volume II, Part 2, Chapter XII

 

3

 

In correspondence with the author

 

4

 

Peter Levenda,

 

Unholy Alliance, Continuum, NY, 2002

 

5

 

Pilot episode

 

6

 

See, for instance, the works of University of Colorado Professor Vine Deloria, Jr., himself a Native

American and pro-diffusionist, who is quoted in Marc Stengel’s article in

 

The Atlantic Monthly

 

(note

8).

 

7

 

The  work  of  Dr.  Svetla  Balabanova—including  the  hair  shaft  test,  which  is  a  staple  of  forensic

science—was detailed in a Channel Four UK broadcast on September 8, 1996, “The Mystery of the
Cocaine Mummies,” which also touched on diffusionism.

 

8

 

See,  for  instance,  “The  Diffusionists  Have  Landed,”  by  Marc  K.  Stengel,

 

The  Atlantic  Monthly,

January 2000, where these facts and the arguments for and against them have been summarized.

 

9

 

Ibid.

10

 

Richard Rudgley,

 

Lost Civilizations of the Stone Age, Arrow, London, 1999, p. 100

 

11

 

Ibid., p. 100

 

12

 

C.W.  Ceram,

 

The  First  American:  A  Study  of  North  American  Archaeology,  Harcourt  Brace

Jovanovich, NY, 1971, p. 193

 


background image

13

 

See for instance William F. Romain,

 

Mysteries of the Hopewell, University of Akron, Ohio, 2000,

ISBN  1-884836-61-5,  pp.  233-253,  for  a  peer-reviewed  study  of  ancient  American  astronomy  in
connection with the mounds.

 

14

 

For more information on the Great Hopewell Road, see Susan L. Woodward & Jerry N.McDonald,

Indian  Mounds  of  the  Middle  Ohio  Valley,  McDonald  &  Woodward  Publishing,  Blacksburg  VA,
2002, ISBN 0-939923-72-6, pp. 59-63, as well as Romain, op. cit.

 

15

 

William  S.  Webb  &  Charles  E.  Snow,

 

The  Adena  People,  University  of  Tennessee  Press,

Knoxville, 1981, p. 81

 

16

 

Wheeling Gazette

 

(West Virginia), February 18, 1852, “Opening a Mound”

 

17

 

This is also a method known to European and early American cultures as a means of ensuring the

corpse does not come back to life, i.e., become a vampire. See Michael E. Bell,

 

Food for the Dead,

Carroll  &  Graf,  NY,  2002,  ISBN  0-7867-1049-7,  p.  170,  concerning  a  grave  of  the  New  England
“vampire cult” discovered in the 1990s in Connecticut.

 

18

 

Webb & Snow, op. cit., p. 81

 

19

 

Ibid., p. 74

 

20

 

Ibid., p. 79

 

21

 

Ibid., p. 281

 

22

 

Ibid., p. 90

 

23

 

C.A. Burland & Werner Forman, Feathered Serpent and Smoking Mirror, G.P. Putnam’s Sons, NY,

1975, p. 55

 

24

 

Roger  G.  Kennedy,  Hidden  Cities:  The  Discovery  and  Loss  of  Ancient  North  American

Civilization,  The  Free  Press,  NY,  1994,  p.  233.  Kennedy  was  a  former  director  of  the  American
History Museum (Smithsonian Institution) and a director of the National Parks Service.

 

25

 

Webb & Snow, op. cit., p. 93-94

 

26

 

Ibid., p. 95

 

27

 

Cyrus Thomas, Twelfth Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology, Government Printing Office,

1894, p. 583-584

 

28

 

See  for  instance  “A  Tradition  of  Giants,”  on  http://www.greatserpentmound.org/

articles/giants.html

 


background image

29

 

There  have  been  many  accounts  of  the  Grave  Creek  Mound  and  its  famous  Tablet,  and  a  lot  of

controversy surrounds the inscription. See for instance Barry Fell, America, B.C., Pocket Books, NY,
1989, p. 21 for his translation of the inscription; and Stephen Williams, Fantastic Archaeology: The
Wild  Side  of  North  American  Prehistory,  University  of  Pennsylvania  Press,  1991  pp.  82-87  for  an
opposing view.

 

30

 

Fell, op. cit., p. 315-316

 

31

 

Ibid., p. 11

 

32

 

Ibid., p. 310, and Marc K. Stengel, op.cit.

 

33

 

Fell, p. 303-309

 

34

 

See  the  historical  overview  of  Roger  G.  Kennedy,  Hidden  Cities:  The  Discovery  and  Loss  of

Ancient North American Civilization, Free Press, NY, 1994, ISBN 0-02-917307-8. Kennedy was a
former  director  of  the  National  Parks  Service  as  well  as  former  director  of  the  American  History
Museum at the Smithsonian in Washington, DC.

 

35

 

Fell, op. cit., p. 21

 

36

 

See for instance Robert M. Schoch, Voyages of the Pyramid Builders, Putnam, NY, 2003, ISBN 1-

58542-203-7,  for  a  lively  discussion  of  the  relationship  between  the  pyramid  builders  of  ancient
Egypt and the mound builders of ancient America, and a corresponding defence of some of the ideas
of the diffusionists. Dr. Schoch has degrees in geology and geophysics however: like Fell, he is not a
member of the archaeologist union!

 

37

 

Ibid., p. 172

38

 

Hjalmar R. Holand, Norse Discoveries and Explorations in America 982-1362, Dover, NY, 1969.

 

39

 

Ibid., p. 278

 

40

 

Lindesey Brine, The Ancient Earthworks and Temples of the American Indians, Oracle, London,

1996, p. 189

 

41

 

Ibid., p. 409

 

42

 

Ibid., p. 95

43

 

Ibid., p. 96

44

 

Peter  Nabokov,  ed.,  Native  American  Testimony:  A  Chronicle  of  Indian-White  Relations  from

Prophecy to the Present, 1492-1992, Penguin Books, NY, 1991, p. 343


background image

background image

C

HAPTER

 

T

HREE

R

ED

 

D

RAGON

: T

HE

 

A

SHLAND

T

RAGEDY

The old folk have gone away, and foreigners do not like to live there…. It is not because of anything
that can be seen or heard or handled, but because of something that is imagined. The place is not
good for the imagination…

— “The Colour Out of Space,” by H. P. Lovecraft 

1

…a strong man with homicidal and religious mania at once might be dangerous. The combination is
a dreadful one.

 

Dracula, by Bram Stoker 

2

I was convicted of witchcraft in the Twentieth Century.

 

Charles Manson 

3

If the Pentagon ever formulates the Manson Secret, the world’s in trouble.

 

The Family, by Ed Sanders 

4

The word “Kentucky” is a Native American word which means “dark and
bloody  ground.”  That  is  probably  as  good  a  name  as  any  for  a
Commonwealth that has had its share of violent death, madness, and mania.
Americans  tend  to  think  of  Kentucky  in  terms  of  horse  races,  bluegrass
music, or the ubiquitous KFC which is probably Kentucky’s most famous
export to world markets. Yet, even Kentucky Fried Chicken has its ominous
side, its darker shadows, as we shall see a bit later on.

In  1991,  there  was  an  exorcism  of  a  nightclub  in  Wilder,  Kentucky  (a

small town near Covington, across the Ohio River from Cincinnati), due to
a lawsuit by one of the customers.

5

 Claude Lawson claimed that the owner

of  Music  World—Bobby  Mackey—was  running  a  haunted  establishment
and that he had been attacked by evil spirits during the time he worked (and
lived)

  there  as  a  caretaker.  Music  World  is  built  on  the  site  of  an  old

slaughterhouse (complete with a well underneath the building that received
the drained blood of the slaughtered animals) dating back to the nineteenth
century and, indeed, it was a site for satanic activity and a cult murder in


background image

1896  when  the  headless  body  of  five-month  pregnant  Pearl  Bryan  was
found.  Two  men—Alonzo  Walling  and  Scott  Jackson—were  arrested  for
murder  after  confessing  to  the  crime.  Self-proclaimed  devil  worshippers
and  occultists,  they  refused  to  tell  investigating  authorities  the  location  of
Pearl Bryan’s missing head, saying it would bring the wrath of Satan upon
them. They feared Satan more than death, because they were offered life in
prison instead of execution if they gave up the head. They were hanged not
far  from  the  slaughterhouse,  and  Walling  cursed  his  captors  from  the
gallows in a scene out of Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Another young woman—a cabaret dancer known as Johana—committed

suicide  at  the  club  in  the  1930s,  but  not  before  poisoning  her  father,  a
gangster  who  had  murdered  Johana’s  boyfriend.  Johana  was  also  five
months pregnant at the time.

The  club  has  been  the  site  of  numerous  murders,  shootings  and  other

crimes. It is one of the strangest clubs in America, for it boasts (if that is the
right word) twenty-nine sworn affidavits by customers, employees and even
local policemen who have been attacked there by forces from what Cotton
Mather called the “invisible world.” Once destined to be torn down in 1993
due  to  some  strange  accidents  that  the  owner  felt  were  paranormal
warnings, it has remained in operation.

If, as suggested in the last chapter, some sites in America are sacred, then

perhaps  Music  World  is  evidence  that  others  may  be  just  the  opposite:
unholy and profane.

There  were  many  other  details  to  arrange;  the  consideration  of  a

proper  place  for  the  operation  gave  rise  to  much  mental  labour.  It  is,
generally 

speaking, desirable to choose the locality of a recent battle; and

the greater the number of slain the better.

—Aleister Crowley,

 

Moonchild

 

6

In  1996,  a  group  of  five  Kentucky  teens  was  arrested  for  the  so-called
“Vampire  Murders”  and  made  national  news.  Members  of  a  vampire  cult
which  numbered  about  thirty  teens  in  southwestern  Kentucky,  they  were
reported  to  have  drunk  the  blood  of  animals,  and  of  each  other,  before
finally murdering the parents of one of their clan and fleeing to Louisiana
where they were eventually captured. The New York newspapers had a field


background image

day  with  this,  of  course.  Reporting  on  the  fact  that  one  of  the  teens  had
called  home  to  get  additional  funds,  the  New  York

 

Post

 

headlined:

“Vampire” Teens Busted After They Called Home for Stake

7

An  interesting  development  for  Kentucky,  considering  that  officials

originally wanted to name the state “Transylvania.”

Odd  bits  of  Kentucky’s  strange  history  went  through  my  mind  the  first

day I drove into Ashland. It was a frightening journey in and of itself. On
the  way  down,  through  West  Virginia  from  my  first  stop-over  in
Washington,  D.C.,  my  little  red  Ford  Mustang  was  caught  in  a  violent
summer thunderstorm in the mountains. Shortly thereafter, I found myself
skidding through a lake of blood in the darkness.

I was going to Ashland, Kentucky for several reasons. In the first place, it

is  the  town  where  Charles  Manson  grew  up.  It  is  also  the  birthplace  of
another  vile  killer,  Sedley  Alley,  who  viciously  murdered  a  beautiful  and
accomplished  young  woman,  a  Marine  who  wanted  to  be  the  first  female
Marine aviator. 

8

Ashland is across the river from another town, Kenova in

West Virginia, where serial killer Bobby Joe Long was born and raised. 

9

It is

in a kind of Bermuda Triangle of death and depravity whose base line runs
right  through  the  town  in  northern  Virginia  where  another  serial  killer,
Henry Lee Lucas, was born.

 

Appalachia. As a native New Yorker, I found

the  very  concept  of  Appalachia  arousing  feelings  of  terror,  sadness  and
disgust. Dueling banjoes. In-breeding. Poverty.

About  fifty  miles  south  of  Ashland,  in  another  Appalachian  town—Inez,
Kentucky—then-President Lyndon Johnson announced the War on Poverty
in 1964. He did so outside a small shack in the hollow, to the backbeat of
television crews and print reporters. Twenty-eight years later, in 1992, that
shack  would  still  stand  and  its  once  famous  inhabitant,  Tommy  Fletcher,
still

 

lived there. Only this time, the television crews would return to report

that  he  and  his  current  wife  had  been  indicted  for  murder:  for  having
children and then killing them off one by one for the insurance money. The
body  of  their  daughter,  little  three-year  old  Ella  Rose  Fletcher,  had  been
exhumed  and  an  autopsy  showed  she  died  of  an  overdose  of  an  anti-
depressant and had also been sexually molested. Her four-year old brother,


background image

Tommy Fletcher, Jr., was hospitalized only a month after his sister’s death,
showing the same symptoms of drug poisoning.

There had been a five thousand dollar life insurance policy on each child.

10

The War on Poverty was another war we lost.

It  had  been  more  than  ten  years  since  my  solitary  investigation  of  the

remote  Chilean  torture  center  run  by  fugitive  Germans  in  the  Andes
mountains. In those days, I had relied upon public transportation to get me
to the rural community of Parral from Chile’s capitol, Santiago, and then a
taxi—a  taxi!—from  Parral  into  the  Andean  foothills  where  Colonia
Dignidad was located.

Nazi hunting on a budget.

Not exactly a James Bond scenario.

Now, however, I was riding in style. It was early summer in 1990, almost

exactly eleven years later, and my research was taking me safely within the
confines of the continental United States. I had my notes, a battered Toshiba
T1000 laptop on the seat next to me, and a roadmap of West Virginia and
Kentucky. I enjoyed long drives, as long as I had a fully-functioning tape
deck and a ready supply of tapes with me.

So. What could go wrong?

As  the  afternoon  turned  to  dusk  in  the  hills  of  West  Virginia  outside
Charleston,  a  spectacular  storm  front  moved  in.  I  was  pushing  the  little
convertible up and down the hills, trying to make Ashland before it got too
dark,  but  Nature  had  other  plans.  Sheets  of  torrential  rain  made  it
impossible to see more than a few feet in front of me, and I had to pull over
to the side of the highway. Ahead of me, eighteen-wheelers had the same
idea, and soon the shoulder was crowded with vehicles whose drivers had
decided to wait out the storm.

Thunder  boomed  and  reverberated  in  those  hills,  shaking  the  car  like  a

Matchbox  toy  and  making  me  question,  if  only  briefly,  the  wisdom  of


background image

driving all the way out to Ashland from my home in New England rather
than trying a more conventional approach. I could have flown down to any
of the larger towns within a short drive of Ashland, such as Lexington or
even Wheeling, but that would have meant a full day of changing planes at
regional airports, since, as the saying goes, “you can’t get there from here.”
Ashland—for  all  the  world  once  a  major  American  industrial  town—is
simply too remote from the rest of the United States to be approached easily
from air or land or river.

I had to go to Ashland. I had convinced myself that only an on-the-spot

confrontation  with  the  place  would  reveal  any  of  its  secrets.  I  wondered
who, in the days since the Tate/LaBianca killings, had bothered to travel all
the  way  to  Ashland,  Kentucky  to  get  a  feel  for  the  place,  to  find  out  if  a
town could breed a killer (á la Hillary Clinton’s oft-repeated African phrase,
“It takes a village to raise a child”), or if evil had other ways of propagating
itself. To most Americans in 1969, the Manson story was a California story:
more  specifically,  a  Southern  California,  or  Los  Angeles,  story.
Conservative Americans—in 1969, in the midst of the war in Vietnam and
political  demonstrations  and  protest  marches  at  home—felt  justified  in
putting  down  the  savagery  of  the  attacks  on  the  Hollywood  celebrities  as
the sort of thing that happens in California. After all, wasn’t California the
scene of the “summer of love” and all that hippie madness? No one saw the
Manson  murders  as  the  result  of  Appalachia  crashing  into  Beverly  Hills,
like a couple of good ole boys in a battered pickup on a Saturday night, all
whoops and hollers and jangling beer cans and rifle racks, smashing into a
gazebo on a society lady’s lawn. No. What neither the society lady nor the
good ole boys would ever recognize is that they are both Americans;

 

that

only happens when there’s a war on, and the society lady needs the good ole
boys to defend the gazebo.

 When there is no war, the good ole boys turn on

the gazebo and smash it to smithereens.

And there was no chance in hell that Charlie Manson would ever see the

jungles of Vietnam.

All the records say that Charles Manson was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

11

It

makes  sense  that  his  mother,  Kathleen  Maddox,  would  have  traveled  that
far  up  river  from  Ashland  to  have  the  baby,  since  it  was  born  out  of
wedlock  on  November  12,  1934  to  a  sixteen-year-old  girl.  The  father  is


background image

believed to have been one “Colonel Scott,” about whom not much else is
known. One can imagine the scene of a possibly much older Colonel Scott
and  the  suddenly  pregnant  teenager  in  Ashland  in  1934:  the  latter  being
rushed off to Ohio to have the baby in secret, away from the prying eyes of
a  small  Southern  town,  the  former  wondering  if  his  reputation  among
friends  and  family  would  have  been  harmed  by  the  revelation,  or  quite
possibly  just  the  reverse.  We  will  never  know.  It  is  believed  that  Colonel
Scott  died  in  1954,  although  even  this  has  not  been  officially  confirmed.
Colonel Scott’s brother, Darwin Orell Scott, was only twenty-seven at the
time Charles Manson was born; when he was butchered to death in 1969, he
was  already  sixty-four.  If  Darwin  was  the  younger  brother,  then  Colonel
Scott may have been in his thirties at the time Kathleen got pregnant. The
military  title  “Colonel”  is  suggestive,  but  not  conclusive.  After  all,  it  was
Kentucky that gave us “Colonel Sanders,” a man who was not exactly a war
hero. Yet, oddly enough, there is no record of a first name for Colonel Scott,
even though he was sued—successfully—by Kathleen in 1936 for paternity
of little Charlie. Scott agreed to pay the princely sum of twenty-five dollars
in  settlement,  plus  another  five  dollars  a  month  for  Charlie’s  upkeep.  By
this  time,  Charlie  was  known  as  Charles  Milles  Manson.  Kathleen  had
married a William Manson—a much older man—after Charlie’s birth, and
that is how “No Name Maddox” became Charles Manson. William Manson
himself disappeared from Kathleen’s life not much later.

Charlie wound up being parked with Kathleen’s relatives in small towns

all up and down the Ohio River—in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia—
while Kathleen had her various adventures. One of these involved robbing a
gas  station  with  her  brother,  Luke,  in  1939.  The  sibling  desperadoes  used
soda  bottles  as  their  weapon  of  choice,  knocking  out  the  station  attendant
with  them  and  robbing  the  till.  Kathleen  and  Luke  were  apprehended  and
Kathleen  was  sentenced  to  five  years  in  the  state  prison  at  Moundsville,
West  Virginia  in  the  heart  of  burial  mound  territory.  During  that  time,
Charlie  was  sent  to  live  first  with  a  very  religious  grandmother,  and  then
with  an  aunt  and  uncle  in  McMechen,  a  town  a  few  miles  outside  of
Moundsville,  where  the  Grave  Creek  mound  is  located  and  where  the
infamous “Phoenician” tablet was discovered. Charlie was only five years
old at the time.


background image

Dr. Joel Norris, a sort of serial killer ambulance chaser and not the most

reliable  when  it  comes  to  names,  dates  and  places  (McMechen,  West
Virginia becomes “Maychem, Virginia” for instance)

12

 recounts a story that

Manson  was  forced  to  go  to  school  in  a  girl’s  dress  by  his  uncle,  who
thought the boy was a “sissy.” (Norris also claims that Manson was born in
Ashland;  this  is  possible,  of  course,  but  I  have  been  unable  to  find
corroboration  of  this  theory.)  The  “sissy”  story  is  claimed  as  true  by
Manson, although others—such as his being sold for a pitcher of beer by his
mother to a barmaid—are probably apocryphal.

What is known for sure is that Kathleen was paroled in 1942, took charge

of her eight-year-old son, and led another series of adventures with drunken
“uncles” in three states. In 1947, the court sent Charles Manson to a home
for boys in Terre Haute, Indiana, where he remained for ten months before
escaping and returning to his mother, at the age of thirteen. Kathleen by this
time had decided she had seen enough of her son, so he ran away again and
began a life of crime, breaking into stores, stealing whatever he could find,
until finally the courts got hold of him again and sent him, of all places, to
Father Flanagan’s Boys Town!

The 1938 film

 

Boys Town

 

starred Spencer Tracy as Father Flanagan and

Mickey Rooney as one of his tougher challenges. Somehow, it is difficult to
picture  Mickey  Rooney  playing  Charles  Manson,  aside  from  the  fact  that
both gentlemen are somewhat on the short side. Flanagan’s experiment was
considered  a  kind  of  boot  camp  for  juvenile  delinquents—and,  of  course,
had been made famous ten years earlier by the Spencer Tracy film, which
won several Oscars—but Charlie didn’t last a week. He and a friend broke
out, stole a car, and made their way to Peoria, robbing a store and a casino
along  the  way.  His  friend’s  uncle—a  small-time  thief  in  Peoria—began
using  them  for  small  B&E  (breaking  and  entering)  jobs  until  they  were
caught once again, and this time Manson was sent to a more serious home
in Indiana, where he remained for three years, until breaking out once more
at the age of sixteen. He was apprehended after a string of crimes in 1951
and sent to another “school for boys” …this one in Washington, D.C., the
National Training School for Boys, a secure institution which was run more
like a prison and which was, indeed, under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of
Prisons.


background image

That was in March. By October, he had managed to convince the school’s

psychiatrist that he was trustworthy enough to be transferred to a minimum-
security “home”: the National Bridge Camp. There, things got only worse.

While  his  aunt  had  visited  the  Camp  and  told  the  board  that  she  was

willing  and  able  to  provide  a  home  for  Charlie,  he  managed  to  ruin  his
chances of an early parole by sodomizing another boy while holding a razor
blade at the edge of his victim’s throat. He was transferred to the Federal
Reformatory  at  Petersburg,  Virginia  instead.  While  there,  he  was  deemed
very dangerous, and sent on to the Federal Reformatory at Chillicothe, Ohio
on September 22, 1952.

One  wonders  what  subterranean  telluric  forces  were  at  work  that  day.

Chillicothe  is,  of  course,  the  center  of  the  American  Mound  culture
discussed in the last chapter. September 22 was the autumnal equinox, one
of  the  important  astronomical  dates  around  which  the  ritual  mounds  were
designed. A month after his transfer to Chillicothe, he suddenly became a
model  inmate.  He  did  so  well  that  on  January  1,  1954  he  was  given  a
Meritorious Service Award. Then, on May 8 of that year—the same year it
is  believed  his  father,  Colonel  Scott,  died—he  was  paroled  back  to
McMechen  (and  the  site  of  the  Grave  Creek  Mound)  to  live  with  his
mother. From Mound to Mound. At this time he was nineteen years old.

It  is  a  mystery.  What  happened  to  Manson  in  Chillicothe,  that  he

suddenly  became  studious  (he  was  still  illiterate  when  he  was  transferred
there),  learned  to  read  and  write  and  do  simple  arithmetic,  mellowed  out,
and became a star “prisoner”? His psychiatric reports were all negative up
to  that  point;  even  during  the  first  month  at  Chillicothe  the  doctors  were
despairing of him, believing that he needed a closed environment and not
the  relatively  “open”  ambience  of  Chillicothe.  Then,  suddenly,  Manson
became a different person and maintained that identity for over a year and a
half,  until  his  release.  That  degree  of  conscious  control—especially  in  a
disturbed,  uneducated,  illiterate,  violent,  criminal,  sodomitic  bastard  child
of  an  unmarried,  alcoholic  mother—is  suspicious,  if  not  alarming.  Was
Charlie “helped” by someone at Chillicothe? According to Manson himself,
in his own words, “I stopped thinking in 1954.”

13


background image

John Gilmore, in his critically-acclaimed 1971 biography of Manson and

the “family”—The Garbage People, retitled

 

Manson: The Unholy Trail of

Charlie  and  the  Family—says  that  Manson  met  a  “boy  named  Toby”  at
Chillicothe, from whom he learned hypnosis and mental manipulation. That
may  be  so,  but  the  dates  in  Gilmore’s  book  seem  to  be  wrong.  He  has
Manson at Chillicothe as early as October 1951, but according to Bugliosi
he didn’t make it to Chillicothe until September 1952. Perhaps it is only a
typographical  error  in  Gilmore’s  book,  because  October  1952  is  a  very
likely  date  for  Manson  to  have  met  the  mysterious  “Toby,”  a  person
Manson  refers  to  as  “definitely  satanic,”  and  the  only  person  of  whom
Manson ever speaks in tones both of fear and awe.

During this time, US government agencies were conducting medical tests

among various inmate populations in America. Their most prized subjects
were  violent  criminals—sociopaths  like  Charles  Manson—whom  they
dosed  with  massive  amounts  of  drugs  to  gauge  personality  changes,
emotional  response,  and  other  parameters  that  have  never  been  revealed.
While  sworn  testimony  before  Congress  in  the  1970s  is  evidence  that
prisons were used for these experiments, and often the prisoners themselves
were  made  aware

  of  what  was  being  done  to  them,  the  identities  of  the

actual institutions as well as the doctors involved (with a few exceptions)
are  not  known  today.  Those  documents  were  shredded  before  testimony
could be given. We will examine all of this in greater detail in the chapters
that  follow,  but  for  now  it  is  well  to  keep  these  questions  in  mind:  What
happened  to  Charles  Man-son  in  Chillicothe,  Ohio  in  1952?  Did
government  experimentation  extend  from  the  adult  prison  population  to
reformatories  for  juvenile  delinquents?  Is  there  any  other  evidence  that
children were used as subjects or guinea pigs in medical experimentation?

The rain finally lifted and we all—my fellow drivers and I—began to get
back  onto  the  highway  and  make  our  way  through  the  hollers  and  to  our
respective destinations. Except that now it was getting really dark.

In the West Virginia hills that time of year the fog and mist sets in with a

vengeance. You drive up a hill out of the fog and for a blessed moment you
can see in front of you, only to start back down the other side of the hill into
more fog. It can be impenetrable, a thick soup of whiteness as dangerous as
the  darkest  night.  It  was  early  summer,  so  the  ground  was  still  cold,  and


background image

when  it  meets  the  warmth  and  humidity  of  the  newly  thawed  air,  the  fog
becomes the good man’s enemy and the bad man’s friend. It swirls around
your  car’s  headlights  like  the  dry-ice  smoke  of  a  low-budget  horror  flick,
and I remembered

 

Horror Hotel

 

and other campy fright films of the early

1960s that always involved a silent small town, shrouded in mist and fog,
and maniacal killers on the loose.

I  drove  in  silence,  realizing  that  I  had  neglected  to  put  in  a  tape  and

probably did so because it seemed oddly sacrilegious to play music in the
gathering gloom. Or maybe it was because the victims in those horror films
are  always  driving  around  late  at  night  with  the  radio  playing  in  the
moments before…

There, in front of me, I could see a car pulled over on the shoulder. For a

moment I thought the people in the car were in distress. The flashers were
blinking,  and  I  slowed  down  to  see  if  they  needed  any  help.  The  car’s
interior  light  was  on,  and  I  saw  clearly  a  man  and  a  woman  arguing
vehemently  over  something.  I  could  almost  hear  them  scream  over  the
sound of my own tires and the wind rushing past the windshield.

I drove on.

Back into the fog, back into the night.

A little further on, there was another car pulled over onto the shoulder,

but this time on the opposite side of the road from me, and pointing in the
wrong  direction.  Again,  the  flashers  were  on.  Again,  there  seemed  to  be
some sort of altercation in the car which this time contained two adults in
the front seat and at least two children that I could see in the back seat. The
front of the car appeared to be damaged, but if the huge dent in the hood
and front fender was recent or not, I couldn’t tell. This was too strange; the
idea of two such cars on opposite sides of the road on this miserable night,
removed enough from each other that their circumstances were not related
in any obvious way, was a little unsettling.

I drove on.


background image

And then, suddenly, I see in front of me an eighteen-wheeler’s rear lights

emerging  from  the  night  and  fog.  I  realize  that  I  am  probably  driving  too
fast, or the truck driver is going too slow. I brake down to about 20 mph and
watch  in  horror  as  the  huge  trailer  veers  sharply  out  of  our  lane  into  the
oncoming lane.

As  I  come  up  to  the  same  place,  ready  to  swerve  onto  the  shoulder  if

necessary,  the  truck  angles  back  onto  the  right  lane  and  continues  on  as
before.  Thank  God  there  was  no  oncoming  traffic  as  the  highway  is
relatively deserted. Aside from the two cars that have pulled over, and now
the  eighteen-wheeler  in  front  of  me,  there  is  no  one  else  I  can  see  on  the
highway.

And at that moment I notice there are dozens of red eyes staring at me

out of the darkness from my side of the road.

It  took  me  a  moment  to  realize  the  eyes  belonged  to  a  herd  of  deer

waiting to cross the highway, and as soon as that registered, a terrible sight
changed the eerie drive into a tragic one. In front of me, and at the place
where  the  truck  had  suddenly  veered  off  into  the  oncoming  lane,  was  the
body of a huge stag, its antlers reaching up like beseeching fingers into the
night, wisps of fog trailing the points like torn lace and fading memories.

There  was  blood  all  over  the  highway,  and  I  had  to  perform  the  same

maneuver as the truck before me, or else it would have been a toss-up as to
which would have won the encounter: the corpse of a large deer or a little
red Mustang convertible. As I drove sickeningly through the freshly-spilled
blood  of  the  deer  I  thought  that  such  a  sacrifice  was  probably  a  most
appropriate welcome to the land of the serial killer and the mass murderer.

On  the  way  into  Kenova,  West  Virginia  from  Huntington—in  an  area

surrounded by other towns with names like Hurricane, Tornado, Nitro, and
the  gruesomely  appropriate  Scary—one  passes  through  the  town  of  St.
Albans.  There  one  sees—or  saw,  in  those  days  not  so  long  ago—a  video
game parlor with the unlikely name of “Red Dragon.” Fans of the novels of
Thomas Harris know that

 

Red Dragon

 

is the title of the first in his Hannibal

Lecter series, made famous by the movies

 

Silence of the Lambs,

 

Hannibal,

and

 

Manhunter.  In  fact,

 

Manhunter

 

was  the  first  movie  made  from

 

Red


background image

Dragon, and is in many ways as powerful as

 

Silence of the Lambs. Readers

may  remember  that  Hannibal  Lecter  was  a  psychiatrist  who  was  also  a
vicious serial killer. Apprehended, and serving the rest of his life in prison,
Lecter would be visited by FBI profilers who would hope to understand the
mind  of  the  serial  killer  through  conversations  with  this  highly  intelligent
killer-in-captivity.

Lecter is a fictional creation, but the concept contains many elements that

will confront us later as we poke behind the curtain of popular fiction to see
the much stranger, and much more frightening, truth it disguises. Seeing the
Red  Dragon  roadhouse  on  my  way  into  Kenova—and,  from  there,  a  few
minutes later into Ashland—only served as an omen telling me I was on the
right track.

In January 1955 Manson married Rosalie Jean Willis, a seventeen-year-old
girl from McMechen who worked in a hospital. Although he held a variety
of jobs for a while, he could not keep out of trouble and wound up stealing
cars  and  driving  them  across  state  lines.  Taking  stolen  goods  across  state
lines is, of course, a federal offense and Charlie was caught, as usual. Only
this time, he had a pregnant seventeen-year-old wife. He drove a stolen car
to  Los  Angeles,  was  apprehended,  pled  guilty,  and  asked  the  court  for
psychiatric help, for some reason referring back to his time in Chillicothe.
The judge so ordered, and he was examined by Dr. Edwin Ewart McNiel in
October 1955.

Dr.  McNiel  had  been  chief  resident  psychiatrist  at  Payne  Whitney

Psychiatric  Clinic  at  New  York  Hospital  in  the  1930s,  before  moving  to
Honolulu  where  he  held  similar  posts,  then  moving  on  to  Los  Angeles  in
1944  and  going  into  private  practice  while  also  working  as  a  consulting
psychiatrist  to  the  court  system  in  Los  Angeles.  Thus,  he  should  be
considered  eminently  qualified  to  offer  an  opinion  on  Manson’s  mental
capacity.

Dr. McNiel felt that Charlie—a poor risk under ordinary circumstances—

might  be  permitted  probation  under  supervision  since  he  was  now  a
husband and father. McNiel recognized that Manson had problems, but held
out  hope  that  marriage  and  fatherhood  would  have  a  socializing  affect  on


background image

the  young  man.  The  court  agreed,  and  gave  Manson  five  years  probation
with no prison term.

Unfortunately,  while  waiting  for  a  hearing  on  another  stolen  vehicle

charge  (for  which  he  would  have  probably  also  received  only  probation)
Manson decided to go walkabout. He did not show up for his hearing, and a
warrant was issued. He made it as far as Indiana before he was picked up in
Indianapolis in March 1956, when probation was revoked, and he was sent
to Terminal Island in California to serve a three year sentence.

His son—Charles Manson, Jr.—was born in March of that same year. On

August  30,  1957,  Charles  Manson,  Sr.  and  Rosalie  Willis  Manson  were
divorced.
 
THE MOTHMAN PROPHECIES

D

ue  to  the  thunderstorm,  the  dead  deer,  and  the  whole  bizarre  gestalt  of

the trip thus far, I had only made it as far as Huntington before deciding that
I should probably stop for the night and drive on into Kenova and Ashland
in  the  morning,  in  the  comforting  light  of  day.  I  also  did  not  know  what
facilities would be available in either town that late at night, so I found a
small hotel in Huntington that had a room available for the night.

There  is  a  certain  gentility,  a  soft-spoken  dignity,  that  seems  natural  to

parts  of  the  South,  and  which  disconcerts  Northeasterners  when  they
confront it for the first time. A native New Yorker—from the Bronx, no less
—I  am  always  pleasantly  surprised  by  it,  even  though  I  realize  that  it  is
simply  good  manners  and  not  a  reflection  of  a  particularly  enlightened  or
lofty  state  of  mind  or  being.  But,  then,  good  manners  are  usually  more
reliable  than  lofty  states  of  mind.  The  elderly  lady  at  the  reception  desk
greeted me warmly and kindly—not with false effusion, but as one human
being to another—and I felt some of the tension of the drive slough off my
nervous system like an old snakeskin. There was a lot of commotion in the
place, and I discovered that a wedding reception was being held in the main
hall as guests began pouring out into the lobby.

I  made  my  way  to  my  room  for  the  night,  arms  filled  with  computer,

maps,  books,  and  small  suitcase.  Once  ensconced,  I  pulled  open  the  map


background image

and traced my journey thus far through the winding country roads of West
Virginia.  Huntington  is  only  about  fifty  miles  downriver  from  Point
Pleasant, the scene of one of America’s worst tragedies… and also one of
its  strangest.  Covered  extensively  in  John  A.  Keel’s  cult  classic,

 

The

Mothman Prophecies, it was also made into a movie starring Richard Gere
and released in 2002.

The basic outline of the story is that, on November 15, 1966, a strange

creature was sighted about ten miles north of Point Pleasant, West Virginia.
It was seen at night, was about six-six or seven feet tall, with what appeared
to  be  wings  folded  against  its  back.  It  seemed  to  be  male,  and  the  most
startling thing—aside from the wings—was the pair of huge red eyes, two
inches in diameter, six inches apart on its face. It was clearly not completely
human,  according  to  the  eye  witnesses  (no  pun  intended),  but  walked
upright like a man. Thus was the legend of Mothman born.

Accompanying  the  sightings  of  Mothman  were  strange  electrical

disturbances, such as bizarre patterns on television sets, phones ringing with
either no one at the other end or a kind of strange buzzing sound, plus weird
warbles on police radio, etc. The thing actually seemed to fly, and in at least
one instance was known to have chased a car full of people, and in another
a Red Cross bloodmobile filled with whole blood on its way to Huntington,
the town where I was now staying the night. As usual, the witnesses were
average, normal people living typically American lives: people, that is, with
no ulterior motive, no hidden agenda. These were not UFO enthusiasts or
college  kids  out  on  a  prank.  The  sightings  began  to  take  place  quite
regularly  all  up  and  down  that  mound-ridden  stretch  of  the  Ohio  River—
from Marietta, Parkersburg and points south—but centered on the town of
Point Pleasant.

Exactly thirteen months later, to the day, the sightings abruptly stopped.

Everyone  in  Point  Pleasant  remembers  the  date—December  15,  1967—
because

 

that is also the date of the Silver Bridge disaster, the worst bridge

disaster in American history. The bridge, spanning the Ohio River between
West Virginia and Ohio, was full of cars and trucks at rush hour, people out
buying Christmas presents or going to and from company Christmas parties
or  just  trying  to  get  home.  At  5:04  P.M.  the  bridge  collapsed,  causing


background image

vehicles  and  the  people  inside  them  to  plummet  to  the  icy  river  below.
Forty-six people died, more than sixty vehicles were lost to the river. Two
persons were never found.

And the Mothman was seen no more after that day.

John Keel wonders if the appearance of the Mothman was somehow related
to the upcoming bridge disaster, hence the title of his book,

 

The Mothman

Prophecies.

 

Are supernatural events harbingers of some impending doom?

If  so,  how  to  correlate  the  appearance  of  a  creature,  half  human  and  half
bird  of  prey,  to  a  failing  bridge?  There  is  either  more  or  less  to  this  than
meets the eye.

There  are  many  designs  of  raptorial  birds  among  the  Adena  and

Hopewell  artifacts,  and  Keel  mentions  other  mythical  birds,  such  as  the
Indonesian

 

Garuda,

 

that  have  appeared  throughout  history  all  over  the

world; he even goes so far as to tie in the Indian burial mounds as somehow
related  to  the  phenomenon,  linking  them  to  the  great  burial  mounds  of
Europe. As demonstrated in previous chapters, there is a distinct possibility
that  some  of  these  mounds  were  either  constructed  by  Europeans  or  by
people using the same technology as the Europeans, and even the same (or
similar) belief systems. The Tumulus (“mound”) culture of Central Europe,
for instance, was prevalent in the second millennium B.C. and was probably
trading  with  cultures  in  the  Middle  East  at  that  time,  such  as  Egypt  and
what  was  left  of  the  vanishing  Sumerian  civilization. 

14

This  culture  was

known, obviously, for their use of burial mounds and for their practice of
burying valuable commodities with their dead, as was the case in the Adena
and Hopewell cultures in America. Neolithic burial mounds are to be found
all  over  Northern  Europe  and  the  British  Isles,  and  later,  in  Ireland,  these
burial  mounds  were  known  as

 

sidh

 

and  were  believed  to  be  centers  of

supernatural  power  and  otherworldly  beings. 

15

The  concept  of

 

sidh

 

is

famous in Irish folklore, and has come to represent the Celtic underworld in
general,  the  domain  of  ghosts,  fairies  and  other  supernatural  beings.
According  to  poet  and  novelist  Robert  Graves  in  his  infamous  study  of
Celtic  mythology,

 

The  White  Goddess,  the  mounds  were  known  as

 

Caer

Sidi

 

or the “Fortress of the Sidi” who were the ancient magicians of Ireland.

The Caer Sidi was also known as the Castle of Ariadne and linked to the
Corona Borealis. To be buried there meant that the body was returned to the


background image

earth, but the spirit had gone to Ariadne’s Castle or, equally, to the Corona
Borealis. 

16

There  was  even  a  British  occult  society  based  on  Druidic  lore

which  had,  as  its  inner  and  most  secret  circle,

 

The  Mound  Builders.

Members  of  this  group  would  figure  prominently  in  the  19th  century
creation  of  the  legendary  British  occult  lodge  the  Hermetic  Order  of  the
Golden Dawn, and would include MacGregor Mathers, Allan Bennett and
others famous from Golden Dawn days, 

17

t

hus reinforcing the link (at least

in  the  eyes  of  occultists)  between  the  mound-builder  culture  and  secret,
supernatural forces.

The  reader  may  wonder  why  Graves—a  poet  and  novelist,  famed  for

King  Jesus;  I,  Claudius

 

and  other  historical  works—is  referenced  as  an

authority. Aside from the fact that Graves’ research on ancient mythology is
excellent, documented and dependable, the reader may be comforted in the
knowledge that Graves was a close friend of William Sargant, author of the
standard text on mind control and brainwashing,

 

The Battle for the Mind,

 

to

which  book  Graves  even  contributed  a  chapter.

 

According  to  Sargant’s

introduction, he credits Graves with having encouraged him to complete the
work  while  he  stayed  at  Graves’  home  in  Majorca,  Spain.  As  for  Graves
himself,

 

The  White  Goddess

 

was  a  canonical  text  of  the  European  and

American  witchcraft  revival  of  the  1970s,  a  book  not  read  so  much  as
handled  like  a  talisman  by  devotees  of  the  Wicca  movement.  Sargant  is
important  to  our  thesis  for  other  reasons,  not  least  that  he  was  also  a
colleague  of  Frank  Olson,  the  biochemical  warfare  expert  who  was
murdered in New York City at the height of the Cold War, a case to which
we  shall  return  in  a  later  chapter.  Thus,  this  strange  nexus  of  mythologist
and mind control expert is one of many reference points or “cultural traces”
in our strange matrix where the spoor of sinister forces may be discerned.

The  fact  that  the  ancient  mound  builders  were  fascinated  with  birds  of

prey and carved their likenesses into their ornamentation could be seen as a
reference  to  a  mythical  bird-like  creature,  which  would  “dovetail”  nicely
with Keel’s passing references to the mounds as possible referants for the
Mothman phenomenon.

Keel mentions another odd fact, something that would stick in the back

of my mind as I worked at collecting data for this book. He mentions the


background image

discovery that Native Americans shunned West Virginia, and that no Indian
tribes  can  be  identified  as  indigenous  to  that  State. 

18

He  refers  to  maps  of

pre-Columbian tribes worked out by modern anthropologists and published
by  Hammond  in  which  the  area  we  know  as  West  Virginia  is  marked  as
“uninhabited.” No one seems to know why the Indians didn’t settle there,
when  the  land  itself  would  certainly  have  supported  a  large  population  in
terms  of  fish,  game,  and  vegetation.  What  is  found  in  West  Virginia,
however,  are  petroglyphs  and  other  evidence  in  stone  pointing  to  the
existence of wandering Europeans. There is also a heavy concentration of
Adena sites northwest and northeast of Charleston, along the Kanawha and
Elk Rivers, sites that date to the first millennium B.C. 

19

 Keel wonders if the

Native Americans avoided West Virginia because of something they knew,
and  something  the  Europeans  didn’t  know.  Something  inherently  strange
about the place. A sinister force.

After  a  few  more  hours  of  unanswered  questions,  scribbled  notes  and

scraps  of  paper  stuck  into  research  material  as  bookmarks,  fatigue
eventually claimed me, and I fell asleep—fully clothed and with the lights
still on—amidst a pile of books and maps and vague, unsettling terrors. The
wedding party downstairs had dispersed into cars, limos and pickup trucks
and a new couple was about to begin their lives in the shadow of ancient
secrets.

Kathleen  Maddox  moved  to  Los  Angeles  at  the  time  of  Charles’s
incarceration at Terminal Island, evidently to be near her son. This is one of
those  relationships  that  simply  defies  any  kind  of  rational  explanation.
When Charles was growing up in Ashland, it seemed Kathleen had no time
at  all  for  him  and,  indeed,  for  a  while  he  lived  by  himself  as  a  young
teenager, earning a living by stealing. Suddenly, though, Kathleen develops
maternal instincts and follows Charlie around the country from one lock-up
to another, from one prison term to another. Charles is married to Rosalie,
who is pregnant and who moves in with Kathleen while Charlie is “inside.”
This arrangement will not last long, however, and by March 1957 Rosalie is
living with another man and stops visiting Charles in prison. Their divorce
—begun in 1957—is finalized in 1958.

At Terminal Island, Charles is tested again by prison psychiatrists. This

time, his IQ has climbed to 121, a substantial improvement over his score at


background image

Chillicothe. His verbal skills have noticeably increased, and he enrolls in a
Dale Carnegie course, only to quit after a few weeks out of either pique or
boredom. When he is seen as trustworthy, he is transferred to a Coast Guard
station  which  is  minimal  security,  but  he  is  found  hot-wiring  a  car  in  the
parking lot and is slammed back inside to serve the remainder of his term.

He  gets  out  on  September  30,  1958,  hooks  up  with  a  pimp  in  Malibu

while under FBI surveillance, and begins running whores himself. He gets
picked up on a forged check charge—shades of his uncle, Darwin Scott—
and is arrested once again.

This, of course, is another federal offense. He cuts a deal with a judge,

and is examined by Dr. McNeil once again. He is found to be a sociopathic
personality,  but  without  psychosis.  (In  layman’s  terms,  we  might  translate
that as “evil, but not crazy.”) Dr. McNeil recommends

 

against

 

probation.

At this time, a young lady presented herself as the mother of Manson’s

unborn  child.  This  turned  out  not  to  be  true,  but  Leona—even  though  a
convicted prostitute under the name Candy Stevens—managed to sway the
judge’s emotions, and Manson was released on probation once again. This
was on September 28, 1959, almost exactly a year to the day after he was
released from Terminal Island. He and Leona would marry that year, only to
get  divorced  in  1963  when  Charlie  was  again  in  prison,  a  replay  of  his
marriage  with  Rosalie.  In  addition,  a  son  was  born  to  Leona  and  named
Charles Luther Manson.

By  December  1959,  a  scant  two  months  after  he  was  released,  he  was

arrested once more by LAPD, but set free for lack of evidence on a stolen
car rap. Instead, he began running women across state lines from California
to  New  Mexico  for  purposes  of  prostitution—another  federal  violation—
and wound up indicted once again after a man filed a complaint against him
for raping his nineteen-year-old daughter and stealing her savings during a
typical  “Hollywood”  scam,  in  which  Manson  posed  as  a  radio  and
television  producer.  The  judge  issued  a  bench  warrant  since  Manson  had
disappeared by this time, but he was picked up in Texas where he had been
pimping and brought back to Los Angeles. An irate judge sentenced him to
the US Penitentiary at McNeil Island, Washington, in July 1961, where he
would remain until March 21, 1967. The vernal equinox.


background image

During  this  time,  Manson  became  involved  with  Scientology  and  it’s  this
interest that has fueled a lot of the speculation concerning other influences
at work in Manson’s life. The creation of a small-time science fiction writer
and would-be occultist, Scientology has been described as either a cult or a
scam,  or  both,  depending  on  which  journalist,  investigator  or  “survivor”
you read. It has attracted celebrity membership, including John Travolta and
Tom  Cruise,  as  part  of  a  concerted  effort  to  win  followers  among
Hollywood stars; it has also conspired against US Government agencies and
been conspired against in turn. Its founder, L. Ron Hubbard, was a former
Navy officer with a history of mental problems. He was a colleague of Jack
Parsons,  the  rocket  scientist  and  follower  of  Aleister  Crowley.  All  of  this
will  be  discussed  in  more  detail  in  the  chapters  that  follow,  as  it  bears
heavily  on  our  thesis,  but  suffice  it  to  say  that  Scientology  in  the  early
1960s was just coming into its own, recruiting heavily on street corners, and
had  obviously  penetrated  the  prison  system  as  well.  An  offshoot  of
Scientology is the Process Church of the Final Judgment, and Manson was
believed to have been involved with the Process as well.

We  are  in  a  dangerous  place  here,  because  it  is  too  easy  to  equate

membership  in  an  organization  with  that  organization’s  blessing  for  every
endeavor  undertaken  by  the  member.  The  fact  that  most  of  the  Nazi
hierarchy  were  born  and  baptized  Catholics,  for  instance,  does  not  mean
that  the  Nazi  Party  was  a  branch  of  the  Catholic  Church.  The  fact  that
Manson seems to have been involved on some level with the Process does
not mean that the Process is guilty—from a legal standpoint—of complicity
in Manson’s crimes.

Yet,  there  is  another  dimension  of  culpability  that  transcends  a  legal

interpretation  of  cause  and  effect.  To  use  the  previous  example,  while  the
Catholic  Church  cannot  be  held  accountable  for  the  actions  of  its  lay
members, it is tempting to consider the Church responsible for creating the
type of environment (authoritarianism, anti-Semitism, belief in supernatural
events, etc.) in which such a creature as the Nazi Party could come to exist.
We  do  not  hold  parents  legally  accountable  for  the  criminal  acts  of  their
children  no  matter  what  the  age  of  the  child,  minor  or  adult;  but  we
routinely examine the childhood of criminal offenders to determine where
the  “problem”  originated.  A  violent  or  abusive  childhood  is  considered


background image

prime breeding ground for a violent and abusive adult, and particularly of
the  phenomenon  known  as  Dissociative  Identity  Disorder  (the  former
Multiple Personality Disorder); Manson’s case seems to illustrate this.

Therefore,  what  effect  do  cults  have  on  their  followers  from  the

standpoint of moral responsibility? As cults try to act as surrogate families
for  their  members,  do  they  not  recreate  the  conditions  of  childhood  and
“mold” their members in such a way as to make them model “children” of
the cult, carrying out the cult’s agenda whether expressed or implied? The
author  intentionally  uses  the  term  “cult”  here,  rather  than  “religion,”
because a cult is generally based on a more recent revelation or illumination
than an established religion: this means that the charisma of the leadership
is still trembling from its contact with the supernatural forces it represents
to  its  followers,  and  attempts  to  create  a  complete  environment  within
which  the  cult  members  function,  based  on  this  revelation.  Coupled  with
this  is  the  understanding  that  organized  religion—older,  larger,  more
powerful—would  frown  on  this  new,  unauthorized  contact  with  the
supernatural  and  would  disavow  any  message  received  by  the  cult
leadership,  thus  putting  the  cult  in  an  uneasy  position.  Like  most
organizations  who  believe  themselves  vulnerable  to  outside  influences,
cults tend to become insular and to develop a siege mentality vis-á-vis other
religions, other cults, the government (perceived to be a tool or instrument
of  whatever  religion  is  predominant),  and  eventually  the  whole  world.
Further, cult leadership recognizes that its members are all former adherents
of other religions, cults, etc., and that the pernicious psychological effects
of the previous, competing religion must be neutralized to make way for the
“new”  revelation.  This  has  led  to  accusations  of  “brainwashing”  or
“programming,”  and  the  development  of  a  cottage  industry  in
“deprogrammers,”  who  kidnap  cultists—usually  by  request  of  concerned
family  members—and  attempt  to  neutralize  the  effects  of  the  cult’s
psychological  conditioning  by,  quite  often,  using  the  same  techniques  the
cult itself used in the first place.

Manson  was  involved  enough  with  Scientology  at  one  point  to  have

picked up the jargon and to pass himself off as a “clear”: someone who had
passed  through  all  of  Scientology’s  “deprogramming”  levels  and  reached
the  stage  where  previous  social,  environmental,  perhaps  even  genetic


background image

influences no longer had any effect on decision-making, emotional stability,
etc. He had a Scientology “auditor” in prison, another Scientologist called
Lanier Ramer, who—Manson claimed—brought him to the level of “clear”
or, more accurately, “theta clear.” (Ramer would stay close to the Manson
Family,  even  after  the  murders,  as  we  shall  see.)  That  he  actually  passed
through  all  of  these  levels  in  prison,  however,  is  doubtful,  and  it  is  more
likely  that  he  simply  borrowed  the  language  and  the  attitude  of
Scientologists.  An  indication  of  this  might  be  his  attempt  to  remain  in
prison:  according  to  Vincent  Bugliosi  (the  Manson  prosecutor  in  the
Tate/LaBianca case) Manson had begged prison officials to let him remain
there.

20

 

He knew he could not adjust to the outside world. In fact, his prison

reviews  said  the  same  thing.  Regardless,  Charles  Manson  was  freed  on
March 21, 1967.

The drive from Huntington to Kenova and then to Ashland was undertaken
on  a  beautiful  summer’s  day,  quite  a  difference  from  the  night  before.  I
stopped  for  a  while  in  tiny  Kenova,  the  birthplace  of  Bobby  Joe  Long,  a
serial  killer  captured  in  Tampa,  Florida  in  1983  and  accused  of  nine
murders  and  more  than  fifty  rapes  in  a  string  of  crimes  known  as  the
“Classified  Ad  Rapist”  case.  Long’s  childhood  was  oddly  similar  to
Manson’s  in  several  ways,  although  Long  was  much  younger  (born  on
October  14,  1953).  Growing  up  with  an  attractive  single  mother,  who
moved  from  place  to  place  and  had  a  succession  of  lovers,  his  earliest
experiences  were  mirror  images  of  Manson’s.  And  where  Manson  was
made to wear a dress to his first day of school, Bobby Joe Long had an even
greater problem.

A  congenital  endocrine  system  dysfunction  was  responsible  for  Bobby

Joe’s breasts. By the age of eleven, his breasts had grown so embarrassingly
large that surgery was necessary and, according to his mother, six pounds of
flesh were removed from his chest at that time. Gender confusion seems to
be  another  element  Manson  and  Long  had  in  common;  Manson,  with  his
short stature and baby-face, made to wear a dress to school, sodomitically
raped  by  guards  and  other  inmates  at  a  succession  of  reformatories  and
prisons;  and  Long,  with  actual  female  breasts  and  associated  problems
related to the endocrine dysfunction.


background image

But  while  Manson’s  experience  of  institutional  life  was  devoted

completely to prisons and reformatories, Long enlisted in the Army. It was
an optimistic attempt at sorting out his life, but it ended badly. Six months
into his enlistment, he crashed his motorcycle into a car while doing about
sixty-five miles per hour. He sustained substantial head injuries, from which
he suffered debilitating effects for the rest of his life, and which—after two
years  of  bizarre  behavior—put  paid  to  his  idea  of  a  career  in  the  Armed
Forces.  The  neurological  damage  he  experienced  was  severe,  but  went
undiagnosed and untreated for more than ten years (until after his arrest for
multiple murders). This was in addition to four previous head traumas, all
experienced when Long was still a child and before his chest surgery. (The
traumas were all related to falls, and do not seem to be the result of abuse
by his mother or other adults.) The aggregate effect of all this trauma was to
severely  affect  his  nervous  system,  contributing  to  blinding  headaches,
impaired vision, and other symptoms.

The  “other  symptoms”  were  probably  the  most  distressing.  Long

developed an enormous and uncontrollable sexual appetite, having sex with
his young wife Cindy several times a day and then masturbating as well. He
left the Army and had a job for a while as an x-ray technician, but lost that
job when it was discovered he was making women undress for the x rays.

Finally, after a few more run-ins with the law, Long began a career as a

serial rapist in Florida, using the classified ads in local newspapers to troll
for  victims.  He  would  find  an  ad  offering  to  sell  furniture  or  other
household items and would make an appointment to visit the seller during
the day, when it was most likely going to be a housewife who would answer
the door. He committed more than fifty rapes in this manner.

The murders were committed largely upon women he picked up in bars

or, more accurately, who picked him up. He was angered by women who he
believed were manipulating him, and he detested prostitutes (which seems
to  be  a  hallmark  of  serial  killers),  so  these  women  he  raped  and  then
murdered for a total of nine victims. He was eventually caught after letting
his latest victim, a seventeen-year-old girl, go free, and he was sentenced to
death in Florida. 

21


background image

Examination  by  Dr.  Dorothy  Ortnow  Lewis  of  the  Medical  Center  at

NYU  showed  severe  damage  to  Long’s  brain  in  several  places,  and
concomitant  neurological  disorders.  Long  was  clearly  brain-damaged,  and
his  crimes  must  be  seen  in  light  of  this  fact.  The  thorniest  problem  of
modern  jurisprudence  is  judging  when  acts  become  wholly  voluntary  or
wholly  involuntary,  and  where  to  draw  the  line.  Long’s  own  testimony
shows that he was aware that what he was doing was wrong, but was unable
to control his behavior. Our usual understanding of the human will is that
knowing  an  act  is  wrong  automatically  determines  guilt  when  that  act  is
committed.  Since  Long  knew  the  rapes  and  murders  were  wrong,  he  is
therefore  guilty  regardless  of  whether  or  not  his  limbic  system  permitted
him  any  degree  of  choice  in  his  behavior.  But  was  Long

 

willfully

committing these crimes?

In order to answer that, we have to understand the degree to which all of

our behavior is willed or automatic; this is the crux of the problem. It was
the focus of one of the twentieth century’s most ambitious explorations of
the  human  mind—an  exploration  worthy  of  comparison  to  the  search  by
Renaissance  kings  for  the  Philosopher’s  Stone—and  it  is  the  subject  of  a
later  chapter  on  the  CIA’s  mind  control  programs.  For  now,  as  I  passed
through the town of Kenova once again on my way to Ashland, the question
had to remain unanswered.

Crossing  the  Big  Sandy  River  between  West  Virginia  and  Kentucky,  one
rounds  a  hill  and  suddenly  comes  upon  the  huge  Ashland  Oil  plant  at
Catlettsburg, a suburb of Ashland. It is a surreal sight in the middle of the
Appalachian countryside: smoke stacks reaching for the sky, atwinkle with
blinking,  different-colored  lights  and  plumes  of  lethal-looking  smoke,
representing a combined production of diesel, gasoline, and chemicals: an
ambience not unlike the

 

Blade Runner

 

skyline of Elizabeth, New Jersey. I

suddenly  wondered  if  I  had  solved  the  problem  of  the  serial  killer
phenomenon in Appalachia: toxic chemicals from the Catlettsburg plant?

Due to Ashland’s strategic location at the confluence of two rivers—the

Ohio and the Big Sandy—and at the borders of three states (Kentucky, Ohio
and West Virginia), it seemed like a logical place to build factories which
could  take  advantage  of  the  river  traffic  to  move  products  in  three
directions.  Indeed,  the  city  brochure  I  picked  up  on  that  trip  in  1990


background image

characterizes  Ashland  as  a  town  “Where  Southern  Charm  blends  with  the
Industrial Northeast.”

22

 ARMCO Steel was founded there in 1900, and there

are nineteenth-century iron furnaces on the tourist trail, such as the Clinton
Furnace,  the  Princess  Furnace  and  the  Vesuvius  Furnace.  The  first  iron
smelting  furnace  was  built  in  1818,  the  Argillite  Furnace.  The  Clinton
Furnace—built  in  1833—was  actually  the  fruit  of  the  efforts  of  the
founding fathers of Ashland, the Poage brothers.

By  the  late  nineteenth  century,  the  railroad  had  come  to  town,  thus

increasing  Ashland’s  profile  as  an  industrial  center.  This  led  to  the
establishment of Ashland Oil in 1924, ten years before Manson’s birth. In
1942, a new refinery was added to Ashland Oil’s plant, this one specializing
in aviation fuel for the war effort. By 1968, Ashland Oil’s annual revenues
would surpass one billion dollars.

But  things  were  not  completely  rosy  for  Ashland  Oil.  As  the  Sixties

turned into the Eighties and Nineties, Ashland Oil was hit with lawsuit after
lawsuit by local residents claiming personal injury and other damages from
the pollution caused by its Catlettsburg refinery. In May 1990, for instance,
plaintiffs won a combined ten-million dollar decision against Ashland Oil,
which was then appealed to the Kentucky Supreme Court. On February 22,
1993  Ashland  announced  a  settlement  of  the  lawsuits,  which  by  now
represented  the  claims  of  740  plaintiffs

23

 

who  had  complaints  against  the

Catlettsburg refinery due to air pollution. The terms of the settlement were
not revealed.

A  few  minutes  after  passing  the  grotesquerie  of  the  Catlettsburg  plant,  I
found  myself  sliding  into  Ashland,  Kentucky  itself,  population  23,622.  I
parked  the  convertible  near  the  Ashland  Plaza  Hotel,  on  Winchester
Avenue,  and  deciding  to  have  lunch  there  and  examine  my  notes  and  the
brochures I had picked up on the way. I definitely had to see the Kentucky
Highlands Museum, which is not far from the hotel, and a few other points
of interest.

Sitting  down  in  the  nearly  deserted  restaurant,  I  pored  over  the  local

newspapers,  seeing  nothing  of  particular  interest  or  relevance.  Ashland
seemed quiet, peaceful, and even a little sad: like a party when most of the
guests have already left. After lunch, I tried to visit the Museum but found


background image

that  it